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Class Schedule

Summer Term 2022 course registration will open on December 3, 2021.

For the May, June, & July Terms (4-weeks each):

  • In-person learning is the default, but some courses will be offered remotely (RMT). 
  • The specific teaching modality of each course is indicated in the schedules below.

For the Extended Summer Term (8-weeks: June & July):

  • All courses are offered remotely (RMT).

FAQ for Summer Terms

Jump to Schedules

Jump to Course Descriptions

Meeting Times

In the event a course is remotely taught, the listed meeting times represent a window for the synchronous portion of the course. Your instructor will have more details about the schedule at the beginning of the term.

May Term: May 10 – June 3
Course Course Title Instructor Time
ART 142 Digital Design Foundations Ashley Ackerman 1:00 - 3:50pm
BUSN 245 (RMT) Principles of Management Cassondra Batz-Barbarich 9:00 - 11:50am
BUSN 356 (RMT) Marketing Research Xiaoyun Cao 1:00 - 3:50pm
CHEM 105 (RMT) The Chemistry of Art Dawn Wiser 9:00 - 11:50am
CHIN 251 (RMT) Intro to Chinese Literature in English Ying Wu 1:00 - 3:50pm
COLL 102 (RMT) Liberal Arts and the Workplace Ben Tanzer 9:00 - 11:50am
ECON 110 (RMT) Principles of Economics Kent Grote 9:00 - 11:50am
ECON 130 Applied Statistics Muris Hadzic 9:00 - 11:50am
EDUC 501 (RMT) Introduction to Teacher Research Desmond Odugu 9:00 - 11:50am
ENGL 220 Shakespeare Joshua Corey 9:00 - 11:50am
ENGL/NEUR 232 Stories from the Spectrum: Neurodiversity, Health, and Medicine in Literature Catherine Reedy 9:00 - 11:50am
ES/BIOL 203 Spring Flora of the Western Great Lakes*

* see course description for key scheduling details
Glenn Adelson 1:00 - 3:50pm
HIST/ES 324 Medieval Disasters & Climate Change Noah Blan 9:00 - 11:50am
MATH 160 Math Methods with Applications Sugata Banerji 9:00 - 11:50am
PHIL 156 Logic & Styles of Argument Chad McCracken 9:00 - 11:50am
PHIL/NEUR 291 Descartes to Kant Janet McCracken 1:00 - 3:50pm
PHYE 130; PHYE 131 Beginning Strength and Conditioning; Advanced Strength and Conditioning*

* 0-credit course
Blake Theisen 1:00 - 3:50pm
POLS 140 (RMT) Introduction to Comparative Politics Ajar Chekirova 9:00 - 11:50am
POLS 222 Congress & Elections Christine Walker 1:00 - 3:50pm
SOAN 240 (RMT) Deviance David Boden 9:00 - 11:50am
June Term: June 6 – June 30
Course Course Title Instructor Time
BUSN 355 (RMT) Consumer Behavior Xiaoyun Cao 1:00 - 3:50pm
CINE 381 "How Beautifully Made": The Movies of Billy Wilder and Alfred Hitchcock. Janet McCracken 1:00 - 3:50pm
COLL 150 (RMT) Data Analytics Using Excel David Jordan Asynchronous
CSCI 107 Introduction to Web Programming Sugata Banerji 9:00 - 11:50am
EDUC 340 (RMT) Africa in Films: Politics, Education, and Development Desmond Odugu 9:00 - 11:50am
ENGL 135 (RMT) Creative Writing Neil Rigler 9:00 - 11:50am
ENGL 205 Twentieth-Century American Literature Ben Goluboff 1:00 - 3:50pm
ENGL 231 Revenge and Justice in Literature Catherine Reedy 9:00 - 11:50am
ES/BIOL 204 Summer Flora of the Western Great Lakes*

* see course description for key scheduling details
Glenn Adelson 1:00 - 3:50pm
HIST 243 Crusade and Holy War in Medieval Europe Noah Blan 9:00 - 11:50am
MATH 110/115 (RMT) Calculus I (Honors Calculus I) Safa Hamed 9:00 - 11:50am
PHYE 130; PHYE 131 Beginning Strength and Conditioning; Advanced Strength and Conditioning*

* 0-credit course
Blake Theisen 1:00 - 3:50pm
POLS 120 Into to American Politics Christine Walker 9:00 - 11:50am
POLS 243 Fake News, Free Speech Justin Kee 9:00 - 11:50am
SOAN 110 (RMT) Introduction to Sociology and Anthropology David Boden 9:00 - 11:50am
SPAN 237 Identity and Memory in Contemporary Spanish Film Daniel Everhart 1:00 - 3:50pm

Extended Summer Term: June 6 – July 29

Course Course Title Instructor Time
ECON 208 (RMT) Systemic Racism in the US Economy Carolyn Tuttle MWF mornings from 9:00-10:50am (3 days x 2 hr/day)
MATH 110 (RMT) Calculus 1 Suha Dajani TWR afternoons from 1:00-2:50pm (3 days x 2 hr/day)
MATH 150 (RMT) Introduction to Probability and Statistics Andrew Gard MWF mornings from 9:00-10:50am (3 days x 2 hr/day)
Extended Summer Term: June 6 – July 29
Course Course Title Instructor Time
ECON 208 (RMT) Systemic Racism in the US Economy Carolyn Tuttle MWF mornings from 9:00-10:50am (3 days x 2 hr/day)
MATH 150 (RMT) Introduction to Probability and Statistics Andrew Gard MWF mornings from 9:00-10:50am (3 days x 2 hr/day)
July Term: July 5 – July 29
Course Course Title Instructor Time
ARTH 202 Photography of the Street Alice Hazard 9:00 - 11:50am
COLL 150 (RMT) Data Analytics Using Excel David Jordan Asynchronous
ES 110 Environment and Society Ben Goluboff 1:00 - 3:50pm
ES/BIOL 205 Prairie Flora of the Western Great Lakes*

* see course description for key scheduling details
Glenn Adelson 1:00 - 3:50pm
MATH 110/115 (RMT) Calculus I (Honors Calculus I) Enrique Treviño 9:00 - 11:50am
MATH 160 (RMT) Math Methods with Applications Safa Hamed 9:00 - 11:50am
PHYE 130; PHYE 131 Beginning Strength and Conditioning; Advanced Strength and Conditioning*

* 0-credit course
Blake Theisen 1:00 - 3:50pm
POLS 276 Law, War and Intelligent Machines Justin Kee 9:00 - 11:50am
PSYC 150 (RMT) Foundations of Experimental Psychology Emily Graupman Asynchronous
PSYC 350 Abnormal Psychology*
*Students must have taken PSYC 110 and PSYC 221 prior to enrolling in PSYC 350
Erin Kaseda 9:00 - 11:50am

Course Descriptions

May Term Course Decriptions

ART 142: Digital Design Foundations

Digital Foundations uses formal exercises of the Bauhaus to teach the Adobe Creative Suite. The curriculum decodes digital tools and culture while explaining fundamental visual design principles within a historical context. Students develop an understanding of the basic principles of design in order to implement them using current software. There are no prerequisites for this course. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Creative & Performing Arts and Technology requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities requirement.)

BUSN 245: Principles of Management

This course introduces important organizational and management concepts and applications, and their relevance to individual and organizational goal attainment. The course revolves around the main functions of managers: planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. The emphasis is on real-world application through experiential learning. No prerequisites.

BUSN 330: Intermediate Accounting

Accounting concepts, principles, and theory with an emphasis on the special problems that arise in applying these concepts to external reporting. Prerequisites: Business 230 with a grade of C- or better. (Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)

BUSN 356: Marketing Research:Insights to Lead

The course serves as an overview of marketing research fundamentals. The emphasis of this course is developing research skills to solve realistic marketing strategy problems. We discuss a variety of topics pertaining to the systematic and objective identification, collection, analysis, dissemination, and use of information. Students develop their marketing problem defining and solving abilities through class discussions, cases, in-class activities, lectures, assignments and interactions in and outside of class. Additionally, students are challenged to apply their knowledge in a realistic simulated business situation (Markstrat). In the simulation, students have opportunities to share knowledge and experience during group work, an oral presentation, and classroom discussions. Students also engage in activities that promote recognition of differences between management and leadership. Moreover, students develop a more systematic knowledge of marketing strategic planning by both learning guiding frameworks and blending theory with practice. Prerequisite: BUSN 225.

CHEM 105: The Chemistry of Art

This course will explore fundamental principles of chemistry and the scientific method through the lens of art. The course will introduce concepts necessary for an understanding of the electromagnetic spectrum; the chemical and physical principles that help to explain color; the chemical composition and interactions of atoms and molecules as they apply to pigments, dyes, binders, glazes, paper, fabrics, and metals; as well as the chemical changes active in processes like fresco painting, etching and photography. Building on a fundamental understanding of chemical and physical principles at work in the materials used to create art, the course will culminate with an exploration of case studies in the use of technology for art conservation and/or the detection of forgeries. The course format will include lecture, some short laboratory exercises, and a field trip. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Natural Sciences requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Natural Science & Mathematics requirement.)

CHIN 251: Intro to Chinese Literature in Engl

(Introduction to Chinese Literature in English) This course will introduce students to Chinese literature through representative works of philosophy, poetry, folklore and modern short stories. The goal of this course is twofold: to grant students glimpses into the rich repertoire of Chinese literature and hence insights into the fundamental humanistic traditions of China; and to develop a set of skills of literary analysis. No knowledge of Chinese language or prior coursework on Chinese culture is required. Taught in English. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Humanities and Global Perspectives requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities and Cultural Diversity requirements.)
cross listed: ASIA 251, LCTR 251

COLL 102: Liberal Arts and the Workplace

Liberal Arts and the Workplace is designed to deepen student understanding of the fundamental skills and knowledge base that a liberal arts education brings to today’s and tomorrow’s professional cultures and innovative workplaces. In addition to curating the courses and experiences students have already had, this course continues to build essential workplace skills in communication, teamwork, resourcefulness, network-building, goal-setting, effective self-assessment, and research skills. Outcomes of the course include a career exploration research portfolio, a mentor network, a resume for internships, a plan for seeking and successfully completing high-quality internships, an articulated, well-researched career plan, as well as a corresponding academic and co-curricular plan of action. No prerequisites.

COMM 212: Visual Rhetoric

We are surrounded by visual communication in our daily lives, yet the ubiquity of visual imagery makes it difficult for us to critically evaluate the images we see. In this course we will approach visual artifacts as texts, paying particular attention to their relationship to the political, social, and economic climate in which they reside. Throughout the semester we will develop a lexicon of visual terms, engage a variety of visual texts, such as monuments, advertisements, photography, typography, and architecture, and practice evaluating visual arguments. Not open to students who have already completed COMM 112 or COMM 370. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Humanities requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities requirement.)

ECON 110: Principles of Economics

An introduction to both microeconomics, the theory of consumer and producer behavior, and macroeconomics, the determination of aggregate levels of production, employment, inflation, and growth. Application of economic principles to the analysis of current problems of the U.S. economy. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)
cross listed: IREL 110

ECON 130: Applied Statistics

Distribution analysis, sampling theory, statistical inference, and regression analysis, with emphasis on the application of statistical techniques using spreadsheet software to analyze economic and business issues. Students who have taken this course will not receive credit for MATH 150. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)
cross listed: BUSN 130, FIN 130

ECON 208: Systemic Racism in the US Economy

This course focuses on ways in which capitalism has used differences in race to reinforce divisions of power and to determine who benefits from its structures. It begins by examining the centrality of slavery to the foundation of capitalism and the industrialization of the United States. The course will survey how race and capitalism have been and continue to be conjoined both theoretically and practically, focusing particularly on the political economy of neoliberalism. Through the lens of the Black Lives Matter Movement it explores how racist policies have led to the inequality in income, wealth, housing, health, and education in the US between blacks and whites. The course concludes by exploring how new antiracist polices can forge a more equitable future for everyone. Prerequisite: ECON 110. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Domestic Pluralism requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science and Cultural Diversity requirements.)

EDUC 501: Introduction to Teacher Research

This course provides the MAT candidate with an introduction to educational research. Topics include the context of teacher research, an introduction to multiple varieties of teacher research, with an emphasis on action research, as well as grounding in quantitative and qualitative research methods. A case study of action research will be completed. Prerequisite: Second year MAT licensure candidate status.

ENGL 220: Shakespeare

Selected plays to show Shakespeare's artistic development; intensive analysis of major plays. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Humanities and Writing requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities requirement.)
cross listed: THTR 236

ENGL 232/NEUR 232: Stories from the Spectrum

(Stories from the Spectrum: Neurodiversity, Health, and Medicine in Literature.) A boy with a penchant for prime numbers investigates the death of a dog. A young girl is scolded for failing to look her teacher in the eye. A man in the throes of a midlife crisis returns to his nonverbal son as he spiritually finds himself. Hidden within these narratives of neurodiverse characters, one discovers a slew of cultural assumptions about cognitive and intellectual disabilities. Do neurotypical writers often turn to autism reductively, as a stand-in for a theme or metaphor? What might an authentic representation of Autism Spectrum look like? This course considers the value of neurodiversity in literature while exploring many of the troubling representations of cognitive difference across time, from earlier accounts of un-speaking children to the "rain mans" of contemporary film. This course ultimately takes seriously the bi-directional intersections between fiction and medicine, as real-life medical practices both shape and are shaped by these stories from the spectrum. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Humanities and Writing requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities requirement.)
cross listed: NEUR 232

ES 203/BIOL 203: Spring Flora of the Great Lakes

(Spring Flora of the Western Great Lakes.) This course introduces students to the identification, systematics, ecology, and natural history of the spring flora of the Western Great Lakes. This course includes extensive field work in the greater Chicago area and eastern Wisconsin. Students learn to identify between 150 and 200 species of wildflowers, grasses, trees, shrubs, and other plants, and learn the characteristics of 15 to 20 plant families. No prerequisites. This Summer Session course in 2022 is held in the afternoons on Tuesdays and Fridays plus full field days 8:00am-6:00pm on Wednesdays and Thursdays. An overnight trip to Wisconsin takes place on May 25-26. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Natural Sciences and Experiential Learning requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Natural Science & Mathematics requirement.)
cross listed: BIOL 203

ES 324/HIST 324: Medieval Disasters & Climate Change

In the fifth century, a cooling climate and epidemics accelerated the collapse of the western Roman state; while in the fourteenth century, worsened by the onset of the "Little Ice Age," the Black Death reduced populations in Eurasia by half and laid the groundwork for the changes of the early modern world. This course teaches the history of environmental transformations and human adaptation through an exploration of some of the natural disasters and climate changes that impacted Europe and the Mediterranean world c. 300-1500 CE. Using specific case studies (including episodes like the so-called "mystery cloud" that troubled Levantine communities in 536 and the unusually well-documented 1348 earthquake in central Europe), the course evaluates how medieval people thought about nature, and how moments of crisis shaped individuals, communities, and larger ecosystems. Students learn to use Geographic Information System (GIS) software to analyze, track chronologically, and map spatially a specific disaster or environmental event. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Global Perspectives and Technology requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities requirement.)
cross listed: HIST 324

MATH 160: Math Methods with Applications

(Mathematical Methods with Applications) Topics from applied mathematics, including equations, inequalities, functions and graphs, and basic properties of logarithmic and exponential functions. Introduction to limits, derivatives and antiderivatives. Applications to business, the social sciences, and the life sciences. (Not open to students who have completed Math 110 with a grade of C- or better.) (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Natural Science & Mathematics requirement.)

PHIL 156: Logic and Styles of Arguments

Focus on the 'rhyme and reason' of language. Examination of the reasons arguments are constructed in the ways they are. Investigation of informal, Aristotelian, and propositional logics, with readings from magazine articles, advertisements, and classical philosophers. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities requirement.)

PHIL 291/NEUR 291: Descartes to Kant

Seventeenth- and eighteenth-century European philosophers, with a primary focus on epistemology and metaphysics, including the essence of the mind and its relation to the body. Readings will include Descartes, Spinoza, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Humanities and Writing requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities requirement.)
cross listed: NEUR 291

PHYE 130 Beginning Strength and Conditioning; PHYE 131 Advanced Strength and Conditioning*

* 0-credit course

POLS 140: Intro to Comparative Politics

(Introduction to Comparative Politics.) This course is an introduction to main concepts and theories of comparative politics. Students explore central questions of comparative politics research such as: under which conditions do authoritarian regimes persist or collapse? Why do some states succeed at democratization and others not? What causes democratic backsliding? Do variations in political institutions (constitutions, elections, party systems) matter and why? What are the causes and consequences of ethnic conflict and civil war? How do social movements get started? Why are some countries wealthy and others poor? How does possession of natural resources affect a country's politics? In addition, students learn about fundamental principles and methods of comparative political analysis. Lastly, case studies of developing and industrialized countries around the globe help students apply abstract theories, concept, and methods and thereby develop strong analytical and critical thinking skills. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences and Global Perspectives requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Cultural Diversity requirement.)
cross listed: IREL 130

POLS 222: Congress

A glance at the enumerated powers granted the legislative branch under the U.S. Constitution suggests Congress is the strongest of the three branches of the national government. Yet the power of Congress is divided between two chambers, and the vast majority of legislation proposed in either chamber never becomes law. Congress is supposed to represent the interests of the people of the various states - and yet its public standing is nowadays at an historic low. This course examines the basic operations, structure, power dynamics, and politics of the U.S. House of Representatives and the Senate. It also considers the rivalry and relationship between Congress and the President. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)
cross listed: AMER 222

POLS 238: Cybercrime and (White Hat) Hacking

This course is an introduction to computer security and related issues such as privacy, democracy, and cybercrime. We cover the fundamental concepts of computer and network security using real-world examples. Subjects include the history of information technology from a legal perspective, current U.S. law concerning the internet, computer crime, and privacy and security protections. Attention is given to the major events in the history of computer hacking from the 1960s to today. Students engage in discussions on diverse topics such as the ethics and legality of computer hacking, the costs of data breaches and cybersecurity techniques. These concepts are illustrated with readings such as narratives, current laws, and court cases, technical articles, and sample computer code. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences and Global Perspectives requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)

RELG 200: Topics

(Spring 2022 Topic: American Radicals.) Radicalism has a long history and powerful contemporary place in American society. Political and religious radicals exert major influence on everything from the founding of the country to the most recent elections. This course tracks a series of radical movements in America, focusing on those that demonstrate political and religious extremism. Some examples include the Weather Underground, Nation of Islam, and Christian Nationalism. No prerequisites.(Summer 2022 Topic: Televangelists, Marchers, Meditators.) This experimental course invites students to help develop a sequel to the popular RELG 234: Witches, Preachers, Mystics. The planned sequel course picks up where the earlier course ends, with the story of American religion at the cusp of the 20th century, moving to today. In this course, students explore the major themes, events, and texts of 20th and 21st century American religion as they work with the professor to map out the most salient ideas that should be addressed in the future course. Students develop narratives of American religion, and decide with the professor which texts future students will use to study those narratives. Possible topics include: religion and the civil rights movement; social gospel and the Catholic Worker movement; liberation theology; religion and immigration; the rise of fundamentalism; Evangelicals; religion and the world wars; post-Holocaust American Judaism; beatniks, hippies, and countercultural spiritual seekers; the Native American Church and related movements; American Civil Religion; religion and the Cold War; the Religious Right; Islam in post 9/11 America; secularization; and contemporary spiritual seekers. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Humanities and Domestic Pluralism requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities and Cultural Diversity requirements.)
cross listed: ASIA 204

SOAN 240: Deviance

How society defines deviants - its outcasts and outsiders - and how the people so defined respond to this categorization; the nature of normal and abnormal, legal and illegal. Do these categories have absolute moral meaning, or do they always depend on the particular society and era in which they are defined? Topics to be addressed include stigma and stereotyping, cross-cultural variations in gender roles, the status of the inmate, deviance as blocked opportunity, and the political mobilization of outsiders. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences and Domestic Pluralism requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science and Cultural Diversity requirements.)

June Term Course Descriptions

ART 240: Digital Photography

This introductory course familiarizes students with the fundamental concepts and practice of digital photography. Students use the basic elements of the camera - the lens, the shutter and the aperture - as well as the inventive use of lighting, to create images that are processed through the digital environment of the computer lab. The course addresses aesthetic principles as they relate to composition, space, exposure, light and color. Processing of images includes learning to control scale, color, file size and resolution while moving from digital image to printed document. Students also learn an introduction to photographic history and visual literacy. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Creative & Performing Arts and Technology requirements.)

BUSN 355: Consumer Behavior

To be successful, all businesses need individual consumers to decide to purchase their products. Consumer Behavior is an interdisciplinary course that examines how internal, external, situational, and social influences impact purchase behavior. While all of us are consumers, our intuitions about our own behavior as well as that of others are often inaccurate. Drawing on research from behavioral economics, psychology, sociology, anthropology, and academic marketing, this course enhances students' understanding of how and why people choose, use, and evaluate goods and services as they do. Through class discussions, cases studies, and projects, students learn why understanding consumer behavior is critical to creating successful marketing strategies. Prerequisite: BUSN 225 (Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science and Cultural Diversity requirements.)

CINE 381: The Movies of Wilder and Hitchcock

("How Beautifully Made": The Movies of Billy Wilder and Alfred Hitchcock.) In June 1960, Alfred Hitchcock sent this letter to Billy Wilder: "I saw THE APARTMENT the other day. I cannot tell you how much I enjoyed it and how beautifully made. I felt this so much that I was impelled to drop you this note." Two meticulous directors with dark senses of humor and interest in the darker sides of the human psyche, Wilder and Hitchcock will help us understand how great movies are made. In this course we will watch, read about, and discuss several of each director's best movies, comparing and contrasting as we go. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Humanities requirement.)

COLL 150: Data Analytics using Excel

In this course, students learn basic and intermediate Microsoft Excel skills to help them analyze data and model outcomes. Students will learn how to perform spreadsheet calculations, create and interpret graphs and charts, execute Excel formulas and functions, manage workbook data, analyze table data, automate worksheet tasks, employ macros and VBA, and conduct "what if" analyses. Students who do not own a Microsoft PC computer (i.e., not a Mac or tablet) will need to use the college computer labs to complete the work in this class. The instructor provides recorded lectures and hosts live office hours to provide support for students as needed. This 0.50-credit course has no prerequisites. Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Technology requirement. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Technology requirement.)

CSCI 107: Introduction to Web Programming

A broad introduction to World Wide Web programming and related technologies. Topics include Internet history and its architecture, managing an account on a Web server, HTML markup, use of style sheets (CSS), page layout design, introduction to interactive programming with JavaScript, the document object model (DOM), and HTML forms. This is a general audience course suitable for those with no prior programming experience. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Quantitative Reasoning and Technology requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Natural Science & Mathematics requirement.)

EDUC 340: Africa in Films: Pol., Edu., & Dev.

(Africa in Films: Politics, Education, and Development.) Africa is an enigma in global imagination. This course uses film as lens to explore historical, cultural, political, and theoretical perspectives on education and social change in African societies. Specifically, it examines the role of politics in the broader contexts education and international development. Key themes--such as tradition and modernity, culture and identity, power and politics, demography and ecology, gods and technology--all draw from historical and contemporary representations of Africa in films to deepen our understanding of the complex origins of humanity and its relationship with rest of the world. Class sessions feature films in/on Africa and discussions on select themes relating to indigenous political institutions, empire, the state, international relations, education, and social change. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences and Global Perspectives requirements.)
cross listed: CINE 340

ENGL 135: Creative Writing

A beginning course in the art of writing fiction, poetry, and nonfiction prose. Literary analysis will be combined with creative assignments. Group discussions and individual conferences. (Not open to students who have completed English 235.) (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Creative & Performing Arts requirement.)

ENGL 205: Diverse Voices of 20th C. Amer. Lit

Works of representative writers. Topics of discussion include American identity and the 'American dream,' developments in literary form, and the social and political values of modern literature. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Humanities and Writing requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities requirement.)
cross listed: AMER 205

ENGL 231: Revenge and Justice in Literature

The dismemberments, squeaking ghosts, and poisoned pharmacies of literary revenges never cease to thrill and disgust audiences with their bittersweet paradoxes. How can we distinguish revengers from villains if their killings are virtually identical? Why does the sober promise of an eye-for-an-eye requital of one body for another become a frenzied massacre of innocents and not-so-innocents? Can justice ever be restored by going outside the law, or a lost past ever be re-found in a sordid present? In this course, we consider some of the central paradoxes and themes of revenge by reading radically-different writers from the first to twenty-first centuries, including Seneca, Shakespeare, Stephen King, and Gillian Flynn. All the while, we watch classic revenge flicks to explore how directors from Tarantino to Park Chan-wook translate these narratives onto the screen. Throughout, we examine the ever-changing meanings of revenge across culture and time. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Humanities and Global Perspectives requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities requirement.)

ES 204/BIOL 204: Summer Flora of the Great Lakes

(Summer Flora of the Western Great Lakes). This course introduces students to the identification, systematics, ecology, and natural history of the summer flora of the Western Great Lakes. This course includes extensive field work in the greater Chicago area, eastern Wisconsin, and Michigan's Upper Peninsula. Students learn to identify between 150 and 200 species of wildflowers, grasses, trees, shrubs, and other plants, and learn the characteristics of 15 to 20 plant families. No prerequisites. This Summer Session course in 2022 will be held in the mornings on Mondays and Thursdays plus full field days 8:00am-6:00pm on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Natural Sciences and Experiential Learning requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Natural Science & Mathematics requirement.)
cross listed: BIOL 204

HIST 243: Crusade & Holy War in Med Europe

(Crusade and Holy War in Medieval Europe) Medieval Europe experienced widespread debate about the use of violence by Christians. The course considers early definitions of Just War and the attempts by the church to control violence around the year 1000. Detailed examination of the origin of the idea of crusade and the history of the First Crusade (1095-99) from Christian, Jewish, Greek, and Muslim perspectives. Examines the later medieval phenomenon of crusade against other Christians. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Humanities and Global Perspectives requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities requirement.)
cross listed: RELG 248, ISLM 243

Math 110/115 (RMT): Calculus 1 (Honors Calculus 1)

The calculus of functions of one variable. Limits, continuity, differentiation, and applications; a brief introduction to integration. Prerequisite: 3.5 years of high school mathematics (to include trigonometry) or Mathematics 105. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Natural Science & Mathematics requirement.)

Theory and applications of the calculus of functions of one variable, including trigonometric and exponential functions. Limits, continuity, differentiation, integration, and applications. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Natural Science & Mathematics requirement.)

PHYE 130 Beginning Strength and Conditioning; PHYE 131 Advanced Strength and Conditioning*

* 0-credit course

POLS 120: Introduction to American Politics

Origins of the American political system, basic institutions, political parties and interest groups, and evolution of constitutional interpretation. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)
cross listed: AMER 119

POLS 243: Fake News, Free Speech

(Fake News, Free Speech and Foreign Influence in American Democracy.) This course focuses on contemporary issues facing public discourse in the United States and explores the dangers inherent in online content. We discuss such questions as: What are the strengths and weaknesses of using internet technology to organize people? How do social media platforms and their ad-driven algorithms bias our worldview? How are democratic elections and mass protests shaped by your unique news feeds? A constitutional perspective on freedom of speech and the press is presented. Substantive topics include analysis of online social movements, legal analysis of federal regulation of social media, federal election law, foreign interference in national politics, and a technical review of social media platforms. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)

SOAN 110: Intro to Sociology and Anthropology

Sociology and anthropology share a focus on exploring the social (group rather than individual) bases of human practices and behaviors. Both disciplines study social interaction and such social institutions as family and religion. This course introduces students to key concepts for viewing the world through sociological and anthropological lenses, including cultural relativism, material culture, and the social construction of human experience through categories like race, class, and gender. Limited to first- and second-year students. Not open to students who have taken SOAN 100. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)
cross listed: IREL 160

SPAN 237: Identity/Memory Spanish Film

(Identity and Memory in Contemporary Spanish Film.) Through the study of a selection of films and documentaries stretching from late Francoism through the Transición, until the 2008 economic crisis, this course provides a critical examination of the history and poetics of cinema in Spain, with particular attention to the relation between the representation of identity and the recovery of traumatic memory in contemporary culture. Regarding identity, this course addresses questions of national and regional identity (Spanish, Basque, and Catalan contexts), as well as the role of gender and sexual identity throughout late Francoism, the Transición, and democratic state. We also analyze how the directions problematize memory, especially traumatic memory, through their films. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Humanities and Global Perspectives requirements.)
cross listed: CINE 237

Extended Term Course Descriptions

ECON 208: Systemic Racism in the US Economy

This course focuses on ways in which capitalism has used differences in race to reinforce divisions of power and to determine who benefits from its structures. It begins by examining the centrality of slavery to the foundation of capitalism and the industrialization of the United States. The course will survey how race and capitalism have been and continue to be conjoined both theoretically and practically, focusing particularly on the political economy of neoliberalism. Through the lens of the Black Lives Matter Movement it explores how racist policies have led to the inequality in income, wealth, housing, health, and education in the US between blacks and whites. The course concludes by exploring how new antiracist polices can forge a more equitable future for everyone. Prerequisite: ECON 110. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Domestic Pluralism requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science and Cultural Diversity requirements.)

MATH 110: Calculus I

The calculus of functions of one variable. Limits, continuity, differentiation, and applications; a brief introduction to integration. Prerequisite: 3.5 years of high school mathematics (to include trigonometry) or Mathematics 105. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Natural Science & Mathematics requirement.

MATH 150: Intro Probability & Statistics

Designed for students in the social and life sciences. Discrete probability theory, distributions, sampling, correlation, and regression, Chi square and other tests of significance. Emphasis on the use of the computer as a tool and on applications to a variety of disciplines. Not open to students who have taken ECON/BUSN 180 or ECON/BUSN/FIN 130. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Natural Science & Mathematics requirement.)

July Term Course Descriptions

ARTH 202: Photography of the Street

What role does the street play in photography, and how did street photography develop as a genre within the medium? How does street photography prompt us to consider and reconsider the role of photography in our daily life? In documenting our world? In history? This class considers the role of the street photography and its evolution in understanding our world, and the ways in which this approach to representation might complicate our understanding of photography as a medium. We examine key photographers from Thomas Annon and Eugene Atget to Gary Winograd, and John Free as well as historical texts and the specific considerations that develop when we take the street and its people as our subject. In addition, we take what we learn about the development of street photography out to the street to explore street photography ourselves in a practical sense. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Humanities and Domestic Pluralism requirements.)

COLL 150: Data Analytics using Excel

In this course, students learn basic and intermediate Microsoft Excel skills to help them analyze data and model outcomes. Students will learn how to perform spreadsheet calculations, create and interpret graphs and charts, execute Excel formulas and functions, manage workbook data, analyze table data, automate worksheet tasks, employ macros and VBA, and conduct "what if" analyses. Students who do not own a Microsoft PC computer (i.e., not a Mac or tablet) will need to use the college computer labs to complete the work in this class. The instructor provides recorded lectures and hosts live office hours to provide support for students as needed. This 0.50-credit course has no prerequisites. Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Technology requirement. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Technology requirement.)

ES 205/BIOL 205: Prairie Flora of the Great Lakes

(Prairie Flora of the Western Great Lakes.) This course introduces students to the identification, systematics, ecology, and natural history of the late summer flora of the Western Great Lakes. This course includes extensive field work in the greater Chicago area, northern Indiana, and eastern Wisconsin. Students learn to identify between 150 and 200 species of wildflowers, grasses, trees, shrubs, and other plants, and learn the characteristics of 15 to 20 plant families. No prerequisites. This Summer Session course in 2022 will be held in the afternoons on Tuesdays and Fridays plus full field days 8:00am-5:00pm on Wednesdays and Thursdays. An overnight trip to Wisconsin takes place on July 20-21. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Natural Sciences and Experiential Learning requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Natural Science & Mathematics requirement.)
cross listed: BIOL 205

Math 110/115 (RMT): Calculus 1 (Honors Calculus 1)

The calculus of functions of one variable. Limits, continuity, differentiation, and applications; a brief introduction to integration. Prerequisite: 3.5 years of high school mathematics (to include trigonometry) or Mathematics 105. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Natural Science & Mathematics requirement.)

Theory and applications of the calculus of functions of one variable, including trigonometric and exponential functions. Limits, continuity, differentiation, integration, and applications. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Natural Science & Mathematics requirement.)

MATH 160: Math Methods with Applications

(Mathematical Methods with Applications) Topics from applied mathematics, including equations, inequalities, functions and graphs, and basic properties of logarithmic and exponential functions. Introduction to limits, derivatives and antiderivatives. Applications to business, the social sciences, and the life sciences. (Not open to students who have completed Math 110 with a grade of C- or better.) (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Natural Science & Mathematics requirement.)

NEUR 118: Our Amazing Brain

This course will introduce students to the science behind how a human brain functions and produces behaviors. This amazing organ is composed of billions of neurons that form trillions of connections with each other. These neurons allow us to sense and perceive the world around us, integrate new experiences with old ones, form thoughts and actions, and develop consciousness and personality. In this course, students will discover how brain dysfunction is the root cause of many illnesses, including addiction, schizophrenia, depression, cancer, stroke, and Alzheimer's disease. Students will also have the opportunity to work with preserved brains. No prior experience with science is required to succeed in this course. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Natural Sciences requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Natural Science & Mathematics requirement.)
cross listed: BIOL 118, PSYC 118

PHYE 130 Beginning Strength and Conditioning; PHYE 131 Advanced Strength and Conditioning*

* 0-credit course

POLS 276: Law, War and Intelligent Machines

(Law, War and Intelligent Machines: The Laws of War and the History and Use of Cybernetics and Autonomous Military Technologies.) This course is about the changing nature of warfare conducted by the U.S. government and other state actors in the 21st Century. We review international law as it relates to conventional warfare and non-kinetic hostilities such as cybernetic actions between states, along with the political responses. We investigate the history and development of the U.S. military forces after 1940, in conjunction with the development of communication, computational and autonomous technologies. We examine the justification of the use of military force by political speakers and analyze them within a legal and ethical framework. This course integrates international law, international norms and analysis of public policies of the U.S. and other states to provide a framework for the use of military force in the 21st Century. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences and Speaking requirements.)

PSYC 150: Foundations of Experimental Psych

(Foundations of Experimental Psychology.) Foundations of Experimental Psychology is designed to develop a conceptual and quantitative understanding of experimental research in psychology. In this course, students gain experience with reviewing primary research articles, identifying the fundamental components of experimental design, replicating classic experiments, completing descriptive and inferential statistical analyses using SPSS, and communicating scientific research. This course is delivered via an online platform with video tutorials, readings, practice activities, quizzes, and a final exam. The course is self-paced and requires regular, independent work by the student. The instructor hosts several office hours to provide support for students as needed. The course is intended to be a skills-building and preparatory course for subsequent enrollment into PSYC 221L (Research Methods & Statistics I), particularly for students who have not completed a laboratory-based introduction to psychological science course. Students who have taken PSYC 110L will not receive credit for this course. This 0.25-credit course is graded Pass-Fail and has no prerequisites.

PSYC 350: Abnormal Psychology

Intended to acquaint students with the biological, emotional, behavioral, and cognitive foundations of psychopathology. Issues of classification, description, etiology, and treatment of abnormal behavior are examined from the point of view of contemporary empirically based perspectives. Specifically, these issues are considered in the context of a variety of psychopathological manifestations, including anxiety, eating, schizophrenic, mood, personality, addictive, and sexual disorders. Prerequisite: Psychology 221 with a grade of at least C-. (Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)<br>cross listed: NEUR 350