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Course Descriptions

Education Courses

EDUC 104: Elem Math from Advanced Standp

EDUC 104: Elementary Math from an Advanced StandpointThis course presents a critical examination of several topics from elementary mathematics. The course stresses three themes: mathematics in the liberal arts, mathematics from a historical perspective, and mathematics as a problem-solving activity. Topics to be covered include college algebra, numeration systems, non-base-10 representations, and elementary number theory including primes and factorizations, rationals as terminating and repeating decimals, irrationals, simple probability experiments, elementary set theory, and mathematical reasoning. Cross-listed as: MATH 104 (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Natural Science & Mathematics requirement.)
cross listed: MATH 104


EDUC 108: Learning About the Living Worl

This course will examine selected topics in life science and earth science such as the human body and its functioning, ecology, ecosystems, weather, the water cycle, and erosion. Designed primarily to provide elementary education majors with the necessary background for teaching in K-8 schools, the course is appropriate for other students interested in strengthening their knowledge and confidence in investigating fundamental concepts and ideas in science. Students will participate in lectures, discussion, student presentations and projects, and laboratory activities. Two 50-minute class hours per week plus one two-hour session for laboratory, demonstrations, or field work. Does not satisfy requirements for the Biology major. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Natural Sciences requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Natural Science & Mathematics requirement.)
cross listed: BIOL 108


EDUC 109: Learning About the Physical Wo

This course will examine selected topics in physical science such as the physical and chemical properties of matter, energy, motion of objects, waves and vibrations, components of the solar system and interactions of objects in the universe. This course is appropriate for students interested in strengthening their knowledge and confidence in investigating fundamental concepts and ideas in science. The course is designed with elementary education majors in mind to provide them with the necessary background for teaching science. Students will participate in lectures, discussions, projects, and laboratory activities. Two 80-minute class hours per week. Not applicable toward the chemistry major or minor. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Natural Sciences requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Natural Science & Mathematics requirement.)
cross listed: CHEM 109


EDUC 170: Intro to Music Teaching & Lear

This course introduces students to the skills of teaching music. It explores how human beings acquire musicianship, and covers the foundational elements of music education. Musical elements addressed include: musical development, musical aptitude, listening, movement, rhythm, song teaching, singing, improvisation, composition, and basic teaching techniques associated with these. Students should expect to actively engage in music making, teaching, and critical thinking. Peer teaching and clinical work with elementary students are key components of this course. Prerequisite: MUSC 251 or Instructor approval. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences and Speaking requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities requirement.)
cross listed: MUSC 170, MUSE 170


EDUC 210: Observing the Schooling Proces

An introduction to the teaching-learning process from elementary through high school. Participants observe, analyze, and discuss a variety of educational environments, including classrooms with exceptional students and classrooms in multicultural settings. Major focus on developing competencies in educational library research and writing skills. Not open to First-Year students. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences and Writing requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)


EDUC 215: Instructional CommTheory & Pra

EDUC 215: Instructional Communication Theory and PracticeThis course applies socio-linguistic theory to the understanding of learning in academic settings. Based on the premise that knowledge is socially constructed, race, gender, class, and ethnicity are considered social markers that shape the meanings and the values assigned to instructional messages. Students study communication practices in the classroom, apply theories in their analyses, and practice methods and strategies toward becoming more effective communicators through creation and/or delivery of lecture, discussion and cooperative learning simulations. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences and Speaking requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science and Cultural Diversity requirements.)


EDUC 220: Philosophy of Education

Survey of significant theories of education, introduction to philosophical analysis of educational concepts, and development of analytical skills applicable to clarifying and resolving pedagogical and policy issues. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Humanities and Speaking requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)
cross listed: PHIL 220


EDUC 239: Hist of Educ in American Socie

(History of Education in American Society.) Two hundred years ago, the vast majority of men and women in the United States only attended a formal school for a few years at most. Many of the functions we associate with schooling - the transmission of knowledge, socialization, and job preparation - took place in the home, community, or workplace. The story of the 19th and 20th century is the story of the expansion of education into a central experience in the lives of Americans, delivered in a vast network of educational institutions. By moving thematically through the roles of both K-12 and higher education, this course will examine the processes through which a wide array of social functions moved into the school system, and the modern U.S. educational system was forged. A central course theme will be how established forms of social inequality and exclusion were incorporated into and then reproduced by an expanding system of education. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Humanities and Domestic Pluralism requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities requirement.)
cross listed: HIST 239, AMER 270


EDUC 244: Anthropology of Education

For the anthropologist, education is the mechanism of socialreproduction, a strategy not limited to schooling but in fact encompassing a person's entire life. For much of the world, the privileging of schooling as a site of education has had real ramifications on the possibility of maintaining cultural forms that go against the pressures of globalization and capitalism. This course opens with a broad consideration of education before focusing on schooling as the preferred institutional form of education under early 21st century globalism. Our questions will include both how schooling operates to maintain existing social structures and power relations and the possibilities - and consequences - of schools as a site of change. . (Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science and Cultural Diversity requirements.)
cross listed: SOAN 244


EDUC 271: Teaching Winds and Percussion

EDUC 271: The Art of Teaching Wind and Percussion Instruments. This course introduces students to the techniques of teaching woodwind, brass, and percussion instruments. Students will develop competency on these instruments and learn appropriate instructional strategies to teach these instruments. Specific instruments include: flute, clarinet, alto saxophone, trumpet, horn, trombone, euphonium, snare drum, and bells. Students should expect to actively engage in music making, teaching, and critical thinking. Peer teaching and clinical work with elementary/middle school students are key components of this course. Prerequisites: EDUC 170 Corequisites: No corequisites (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities requirement.)
cross listed: MUSC 271, MUSE 271


EDUC 272: Teaching String Instruments

EDUC 272: The Art of Teaching String Instruments. This course introduces students to the techniques of playing and teaching string instruments. Students will develop competency on these instruments and learn appropriate instructional strategies to teach these instruments. Specific instruments include: violin, viola, cello, and bass. Students should expect to actively engage in music making, teaching, and critical thinking. Peer teaching and clinical work with elementary/middle school students are key components of this course. Prerequisites: EDUC 170, with a grade of B- or better. Corequisites: No corequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities requirement.)
cross listed: MUSC 272, MUSE 272


EDUC 273: Teaching Instrumental Ensemble

EDUC 273: The Art of Teaching Instrumental Ensembles. This course introduces students to the techniques of teaching bands and orchestras. This course is intended to provide students with a strong foundation of both skill and conceptual understanding in order to prepare them for a career in instrumental music education. It involve learning within both a college classroom setting and as a teacher and observer within K-12 schools. Specific elements include: conducting, score study, rehearsal technique, practical elements associated with organizing and executing an instrumental ensemble, and band/orchestra literature. Students should expect to actively engage in music making, teaching, and critical thinking. Peer teaching and clinical work with middle school students are key components of this course. Prerequisites: EDUC 170 with a grade of B- or better. Corequisites: No corequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities requirement.)
cross listed: MUSC 273, MUSE 273


EDUC 274: Teaching Choral Ensembles

EDUC 274: The Art of Teaching Choral Ensembles. This course introduces students to the techniques of teaching choir. This course is intended to provide students with a strong foundation of both skill and conceptual understanding in order to prepare them for a career in vocal music education. It involves learning within both a classroom setting and as a teacher and observer within K-12 schools. Specific elements include: conducting, score study, rehearsal technique, practical elements associated with organizing and executing a choral ensemble, and choral literature. Students should expect to actively engage in music making, teaching, and critical thinking. Peer teaching and clinical work with middle school students are key components of this course. Prerequisites: EDUC 170 with a grade of B- or better. Corequisites: No corequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities requirement.)
cross listed: MUSC 274, MUSE 274


EDUC 275: Teaching Music in Elementary S

EDUC 275: Teaching Music in the Elementary School. This course introduces students to the techniques of teaching music to elementary age students. Students will become exposed to developmentally appropriate musical activities for students in kindergarten through eighth grade. Multiple approaches will be presented including Orff, Kodaly, Dalcroze, and Music Learning Theory. Students should expect to actively engage in music making, teaching, and critical thinking. Peer teaching and clinical work with elementary students are key components of this course. Prerequisites: EDUC 170 with a grade of B- or better. Corequisites: No corequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences and Technology requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)
cross listed: MUSE 275


EDUC 303: Reading Methods in Elementary

EDUC 303: Reading Methods in the Elementary School Places emphasis on theories of language acquisition and on characteristics of language development as they relate to teaching reading and the language arts. Includes research-based practices related to teaching reading comprehension, vocabulary acquisition and development, fluency, and grapho-phonemic skills; includes multiple approaches to reading and language instruction. Students will learn strategies for teaching ELL students and students with exceptional needs and differentiation models for meeting the needs of each student. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 304. Prerequisites: Education 210 and licensure candidate status. (Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)
cross listed: EDUC 403


EDUC 304: Elementary Fieldwork & Seminar

Half-day pre-student teaching fieldwork practicum in the elementary school. Elementary licensure candidates complete 150 hours of supervised classroom observation and participation. Placements are arranged by the Education Department and supervised by faculty within the Education Department on a biweekly basis. Placement in a multicultural setting with a focus on instructional strategies for English language learners (ELLs) is required. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 303. Prerequisites: Education 210 and licensure candidate status. Cross-listed as: EDUC 404. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Domestic Pluralism and Experiential Learning requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science and Cultural Diversity requirements.)
cross listed: EDUC 404


EDUC 309: Immigration and Education

EDUC 309: Immigration and Education: Race, Language, and American Schools While immigration has become a lightning rod for political debate, there is a long history of using education as a tool toward socializing different newcomer groups into American society. This course will examine the ways in which schools have wrestled with the issues of immigration, race, and language as well as the policies and programs that serve to meet immigrant needs in schools, and the social and political implications of immigration. There will be special attention given to Chicago's particular port-of-entry issues. . (Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science and Cultural Diversity requirements.)


EDUC 310: Equity & Social Justice in Edu

(Equity and Social Justice in Education) This course examines 'equity' and 'social justice' both as concepts and in the context of three aspects of education: the historical founding of U.S. schools on oppressive ideals; the primary roles of race/ethnicity, space, and socioeconomic status, but also religion, gender, sexual orientation, language, and (dis)ability in individual and group experiences of schooling; and strategies for socially just education. The course uses documentary history, scholarly sources, and personal narratives to explore tensions between the ideals of freedom and equality and the reality of segregation and marginalization in U.S. education. Course content focuses on U.S. public education as a microcosm of equity and social justice issues nationally and internationally. Not open to first-year students. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences and Domestic Pluralism requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science and Cultural Diversity requirements.)
cross listed: ETHC 340, AFAM 310


EDUC 311: Advanced Fieldwork

Students who have completed 210 and wish to have additional experience of a different nature in school settings may apply for independent study in schools. Research on some special aspect of schooling is often required. This course is graded only on a Credit/D/Fail basis. (Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)


EDUC 312: Integrating Arts in Learning P

EDUC 312: Integrating the Arts in the Learning ProcessThis course focuses on the integration of the fine arts in the elementary school curriculum. Students will learn how to meaningfully incorporate the visual arts, drama, music, and dance across the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities in K-8 classrooms to enrich the learning process. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Creative & Performing Arts requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)


EDUC 313: Reading Methods in Content Are

Multiple approaches to the teaching of reading, characteristics of language development and its relation to intellectual development in the disciplines, and the application of instructional models to the teaching of writing and reading in the content areas, including teaching exceptional students, especially English Language Learners. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 315. Prerequisites: Education 210 and teacher licensure candidate status. (Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)
cross listed: EDUC 413


EDUC 314: Inclusive Learning Environment

Emphasis on approaches and methodology that establish an inclusive classroom environment, including methods of instruction and curriculum and instructional and management modifications for students with exceptionalities. Response to Intervention, IEPs, and other school practices that aim to meet the needs of each child are included in this course. Topics include identification of various exceptionalities (e.g., learning disabilities, mental retardation, physical disabilities, etc.) that affect students and the structuring of their learning environments; the role of the special educator in relation to the regular classroom teacher; federal and state legislation that governs special education and the role of the regular classroom teacher; observation and analysis of students with exceptionalities in various learning environments; multicultural and linguistic differences as related to special education; instructional strategy modifications for special populations; and the development of classroom cultures that are sensitive and responsive to differences in gender and sexual orientation. Prerequisite: Psychology 210 or permission of the department chairperson. Cross-listed as: EDUC 414 (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences and Domestic Pluralism requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)
cross listed: EDUC 414


EDUC 315: Middle School Fieldwork & Semi

Half-day pre-student teaching fieldwork practicum in the middle and junior high school. Secondary licensure candidates complete 150 hours of supervised classroom observation and participation. Placements are arranged by the Education Department and supervised by faculty within the Education Department on a biweekly basis. Placement at a multicultural site with a focus on instructional strategies for English language learners (ELLs) is required. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 313. Prerequisite: Acceptance for licensure candidacy. Cross-listed as: EDUC 415. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Domestic Pluralism and Experiential Learning requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science and Cultural Diversity requirements.)
cross listed: EDUC 415


EDUC 320: Comparative and International

(Comparative and International Education: Education as the Practice of Freedom) This course examines both the study and practice of comparative and international education. The course is organized with a multidisciplinary perspective with analysis of history, theory, methods, and issues in comparative and international education. A major goal of the course is to interrogate the linkages between education and society. Recurrent themes will be examined to demonstrate how every educational system not only arises from but also shapes its particular socio-cultural context. Students will have the opportunity to deepen and expand their knowledge of educational issues within a global context. Not open to first year students. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences and Global Perspectives requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science and Cultural Diversity requirements.)
cross listed: ETHC 330, SOAN 344, IREL 395


EDUC 322: Education in Developing Countr

(Education and Development in Developing Countries) This course explores the historical background, philosophical foundations and major themes in the education of 'developing countries' within the broader context of global development and social change. The specific goal of this course is to familiarize students with the evolution of and critical issues in formal education in most low income, less industrialized nations. Students will be able to explore contemporary themes in education from a historical and comparative perspective. Additionally, they will expand their conceptual schema for rethinking educational issues within and beyond their own societies. Geographically, this course covers countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America, but runs comparisons with countries in Europe and North America when theoretically relevant. Reading materials build on development studies and several disciplines in the social sciences and humanities such as history, philosophy, anthropology, sociology and education. Not open to first year students. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences and Global Perspectives requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Cultural Diversity requirement.)
cross listed: IREL 396, SOAN 343


EDUC 344: Africa in Films: Lang., Educ.,

(Africa in Films: Language, Education, Development.) Africa is an enigma in global imagination. This course uses films as lenses to explore historical, cultural, political, and theoretical perspectives on education and social change in African societies. Specifically, it examines language policies and linguistic practices in learning contexts and in the broader context of global development. Key themes--such as tradition and modernity, orality and literacy, communication and conflict, culture and identity, power and politics, demography and ecology, gods and technology--all draw from historical and contemporary representations of Africa in films to deepen our understanding of the complex origins of humanity and its connection to rest of the world. Class sessions feature films in/on Africa and discussions on select themes. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences and Global Perspectives requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Cultural Diversity requirement.)
cross listed: CINE 344


EDUC 403: Reading in the Elementary Scho

Reading Methods in the Elementary School: Places emphasis on theories of language acquisition and on characteristics of language development as they relate to teaching reading and the language arts. Includes research-based practices related to teaching reading comprehension, vocabulary acquisition and development, fluency, and grapho-phonemic skills; includes multiple approaches to reading and language instruction. Students will learn strategies for teaching ELL students and students with exceptional needs and differentiation models for meeting the needs of each student. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 404. Prerequisites: Education 210 and MAT licensure candidate status. (Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)
cross listed: EDUC 303


EDUC 404: Elementary Fieldwork & Seminar

Half-day pre-student teaching fieldwork practicum in the elementary school. Elementary licensure candidates complete 150 hours of supervised classroom observation and participation. Placements are arranged by the Education Department and supervised by faculty within the Education Department on a biweekly basis. Placement in a multicultural setting with a focus on instructional strategies for English language learners (ELLs) is required. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 403. Prerequisites: Education 210 and licensure candidate status. . Cross-listed as: EDUC 304. (Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science and Cultural Diversity requirements.)
cross listed: EDUC 304


EDUC 406: Teaching Adolescent Students

This course emphasizes the importance of developing special skills, competencies, and understanding for teaching middle school students. It includes middle-grade philosophy, curriculum, instruction, and methods; design and development of middle-grade lessons and programs; assessment coordination and referral of students to health and social services; and observation and participation in middle school classrooms. Prerequisites: Education 303 and 304. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Experiential Learning requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)
cross listed: EDUC 506


EDUC 411: Advanced Fieldwork

Students who have completed 210 and wish to have additional experience of a different nature in school settings may apply for independent study in schools. Research on some special aspect of schooling is often required. This course is graded only on a Pass-Fail basis. (Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)


EDUC 413: Reading Methods in Content Are

Multiple approaches to the teaching of reading, characteristics of language development and its relation to intellectual development in the disciplines, and the application of instructional models to the teaching of writing and reading in the content areas, including teaching exceptional students, especially the English Language Learners. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 415. Prerequisites: Education 210 and MAT licensure candidate status. (Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)
cross listed: EDUC 313


EDUC 414: Inclusive Learning Environment

Emphasis on approaches and methodology that establish an inclusive classroom environment, including methods of instruction and curriculum and instructional and management modifications for students with exceptionalities. Response to Intervention, IEPs, and other school practices that aim to meet the needs of each child are included in this course. Topics include identification of various exceptionalities (e.g., learning disabilities, mental retardation, physical disabilities, etc.) that affect students and the structuring of their learning environments; the role of the special educator in relation to the regular classroom teacher; federal and state legislation that governs special education and the role of the regular classroom teacher; observation and analysis of students with exceptionalities in various learning environments; multicultural and linguistic differences as related to special education; instructional strategy modifications for special populations; and the development of classroom cultures that are sensitive and responsive to differences in gender and sexual orientation. Prerequisite: Psychology 210 or permission of the department chairperson. Cross-listed as: EDUC 314 (Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)
cross listed: EDUC 314


EDUC 415: Middle School Fieldwork & Semi

Half-day pre-student teaching fieldwork practicum in the middle and junior high school. Secondary licensure candidates complete 150 hours of supervised classroom observation and participation. Placements are arranged by the Education Department and supervised by faculty within the Education Department on a biweekly basis. Placement at a multicultural site with a focus on instructional strategies for English language learners (ELLs) is required. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 413. Prerequisite: Acceptance for licensure candidacy. . Cross-listed as: EDUC 315. (Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science and Cultural Diversity requirements.)
cross listed: EDUC 315


EDUC 416: Elem & Mid Schl-Literacy & Soc

EDUC 416: Curriculum and Instruction in the Elementary and Middle School: Content-Area Literacy and Social StudiesSeminar focusing on research-based content area reading practices and curriculum and instructional planning. Includes theoretical and philosophical frameworks for curriculum design, instructional approaches, and assessment, including data analysis and its use in instructional planning. Also stresses principles of establishing various learning environments for student engagement in learning and curriculum integration and how curricula are organized for children at differing developmental levels with various backgrounds in school literacy environments. Prerequisite: Education 303/304 with a grade of B- or better; co-requisite: Education 417. (Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)
cross listed: EDUC 516


EDUC 417: Elem & Mid Schl-Math & Science

EDUC 417: Curriculum and Instruction in the Elementary and Middle School: Math and Science Seminar focusing on curriculum and instructional planning in math and science and how math and science curricula are organized for children at differing developmental levels and with various backgrounds. Includes theoretical and philosophical frameworks for curriculum design, instructional approaches, and assessment in math and science. Students will practice creating Teacher Work Samples that use data to plan instruction and help focus teachers on the impact of instruction on student learning Also stresses principles of and practice for using various technological teaching tools. This course has fieldwork experiences in science, math, and technology instruction. Prerequisite: Education 303/304 with a grade of B- or better; co-requisite Education 416. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Technology requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)
cross listed: EDUC 517


EDUC 418: Elem Student Teaching & Semina

EDUC 418: Elementary Student Teaching and SeminarFull-day supervised teaching for 14 weeks in a cooperating school and a weekly seminar. This course is graded only on a SCR/D/Fail basis. (There will be a licensure portfolio scoring fee for this class of $300.) Prerequisite: Education 416/417 with a grade of B- or better. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Experiential Learning requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)
cross listed: EDUC 518


EDUC 419: Adolescent Curr & Instruc Desi

EDUC 419: Adolescent Curriculum and Instructional DesignThis senior seminar focuses on the practical use of educational theory in the adolescent classroom by investigating and applying knowledge of research-based curriculum design practices, learning theory, lesson and course planning, assessment and use of data to improve instruction, integration of classroom technology, reading in the content areas, and classroom management. Students will conduct analyses of teaching theory and practice, create and analyze lesson design using an edTPA model, and analyze unit structures and resources through a series of authentic tasks. Prerequisite: Education 313/315 with a grade of B- or better; co-requisite Education 420. Cross-listed as: EDUC 519. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Technology requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)
cross listed: EDUC 519


EDUC 420: Disc Spec Mthds Teachng Adoles

EDUC 420: Discipline-Specific Methods for Teaching AdolescentsThis senior seminar focuses on approaches and methodology in the teaching of the content area of licensure. Students will explore research-based instructional theories central to their teaching discipline, subject matter-specific ways of constructing knowledge, and specific methods of inquiry and assessment for learning in a particular subject field. Students will conduct research on an area of study relevant to their discipline, present content-area demonstration lessons, and construct a culminating unit demonstrating best practices for teaching in their disciplines. In addition, each student will be assigned a clinical placement in an adolescent classroom for observation hours and consultation with a field-based faculty mentor in connection with the class. Prerequisite: Education 313/315 with a grade of B- or better; co-requisite Education 419. (Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)


EDUC 421: St Teach in Adolescent Classrm

EDUC 421: Student Teaching in Adolescent ClassroomsFull-day supervised teaching for 14 weeks at the appropriate grade level in a cooperating school and a weekly seminar. This course is graded only on a SCR/D/Fail basis. (There will be a licensure portfolio scoring fee for this class of $300.) Prerequisite: Education 419/420 or 422 with a grade of B- or better. Cross-listed as: EDUC 521 (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Experiential Learning requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)
cross listed: EDUC 521


EDUC 422: Discipline-Specific K-12 Curri

(Discipline-Specific K-12 Curriculum and Instructional Design) This senior seminar focuses on approaches and methodology in the teaching of the content area of licensure. Students will explore research-based instructional theories central to their teaching discipline, subject matter-specific ways of constructing knowledge, and specific methods of inquiry and assessment for learning in a particular subject field. Students will conduct research on an area of study relevant to their discipline, present content-area demonstration lessons, and construct a culminating unit demonstrating best practices for teaching in their disciplines. In addition, each student will be assigned two clinical placements: one in a high school for observation hours and consultation with a field-based faculty mentor; and one in an elementary school for a practicum teaching experience with a mentor teacher and a college supervisor. Prerequisite: entrance into teacher licensure program; EDUC 313 and 315 with grades of B- or better; co-requisite EDUC 419. (Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)
cross listed: EDUC 522


EDUC 448: ADV. SEM.: ESL/Bilingual Educa

(Advanced Seminar: English as a Second Language and Bilingual Education.) The growing linguistic and cultural diversity of U.S. student population calls for responsive teachers to nurture students' rich and diverse linguistic and cultural assets. In this course, teacher candidates will study theories and practices of language acquisition and multiliteracy, such as research-based models of bilingual education and literacy instruction in English Learner (EL) students' primary language(s) and in English. The course focuses on instruction and assessment of content in the primary language(s) of EL students and in English. Assessment tools and techniques, as well as issues related to bias, reliability, and validity will be addressed. Additional topics include additive and subtractive theories of bilingual/multilingual education, support for English Language Learners and their families, multilingualism, translanguaging, and recognition of ESL students' cultural and linguistic assets. Prerequisites: EDUC 303/403 and EDUC 304/404 OR EDUC 313/413 and EDUC 315/415. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Humanities and Domestic Pluralism requirements.)
cross listed: EDUC 548


EDUC 450: Special Studies in Education

Advanced research in the process of schooling and teaching. May be an independent project or an advanced internship. Available only to juniors and seniors. Can be taken for one or two credits depending on the scope of the project and with approval of Department Chair. (Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)


EDUC 486: ADV SEM: Learning Behv. Specls

(Advanced Seminar: Learning Behavior Specialist 1 (Special Education)). All learners are unique in their backgrounds, dispositions, and needs. To nurture and support these individual dynamics within a school context, special educators bring a deep understanding of learning differences, professional expertise as teachers, and an ethic of care to support diverse students, including those with Individualized Education Program (IEPs) and/or 504 Plans to succeed both in integrated learning contexts and beyond. This course is designed to expand the depth and knowledge of the foundational skills and learner characteristics introduced in the Inclusive Learning Environments (EDUC 314/414) course. It emphasizes educational and behavioral assessment; using data to plan instruction and write data-based goals; the use of evidence-based instructional and behavioral interventions; progress monitoring; and the role of collaboration and consultation in supporting students with diverse abilities. Prerequisites: EDUC 210 and EDUC 314
cross listed: EDUC 586


EDUC 501: Introduction to Teacher Resear

This course provides the MAT candidate with an introduction to educational research. Topics include the context of teacher research, an introduction to multiple varieties of teacher research, with an emphasis on action research, as well as grounding in quantitative and qualitative research methods. A case study of action research will be completed. Prerequisite: Second year MAT licensure candidate status.


EDUC 502: Teacher Action Research Projec

This course provides the MAT candidate with an opportunity to conduct a teacher action research project within the context of the student teaching placement. Supervision will be provided by Education Department Faculty members as well as the cooperating teaching in the elementary or secondary placement. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 518 or 521. Prerequisite: Education 516/517 sequence or 519/520 sequence or 522 sequence with a grade of B- or better and second year MAT licensure candidate status.


EDUC 506: Teaching Adolescent Students

This course emphasizes the importance of developing special skills, competencies, and understanding for teaching middle school students. It includes middle-grade philosophy, curriculum, instruction, and methods; design and development of middle-grade lessons and programs; assessment coordination and referral of students to health and social services; and observation and participation in middle school classrooms. Prerequisites: Education 403/404 with a grade of B- or better and second year MAT licensure candidate status.
cross listed: EDUC 406


EDUC 516: Elem & Mid Schl-Literacy & Soc

(Curriculum and Instruction in the Elementary and Middle School: Content-Area Literacy and Social Studies) This graduate seminar focuses on research-based content area reading practices and curriculum and instructional planning. Includes theoretical and philosophical frameworks for curriculum design, instructional approaches, and assessment, including data analysis and its use in instructional planning. Also stresses principles of establishing various learning environments for student engagement in learning and curriculum integration and how curricula are organized for children at differing developmental levels with various backgrounds in school literacy environments. Additional work aligned with the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards criteria will be required. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 517. Prerequisite: Education 403 and 404 with a grade of B- or better and second year MAT licensure candidate status.
cross listed: EDUC 416


EDUC 517: Elem & Mid Schl-Math & Science

(Curriculum and Instruction in the Elementary and Middle School: Math and Science) This graduate seminar focuses on curriculum and instructional planning in math and science and how math and science curricula are organized for children at differing developmental levels and with various backgrounds. Includes theoretical and philosophical frameworks for curriculum design, instructional approaches, and assessment in math and science. Students will practice creating Teacher Work Samples that use data to plan instruction and help focus teachers on the impact of instruction on student learning. Also stresses principles of and practice for using various technological teaching tools. This course has fieldwork experiences in science, math, and technology instruction. Additional work aligned with the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards criteria will be required. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 516. Prerequisite: Education 403 and 404 with a grade of B- or better and second year MAT licensure candidate status.
cross listed: EDUC 417


EDUC 518: Elementary Student Teaching &

(Elementary Student Teaching and Seminar) Full-day supervised teaching for 14 weeks in a cooperating school and a weekly seminar. This course is graded only on a SCR/D/Fail basis. (There will be a licensure portfolio scoring fee for this class of $300.) Prerequisite: Education 516/517 with a grade of B- or better.
cross listed: EDUC 418


EDUC 519: Adolescent Curr and Instruct

(Adolescent Curriculum and Instructional Design) This graduate seminar focuses on the practical use of educational theory in the adolescent classroom by investigating and applying knowledge of research-based curriculum design practices, learning theory, lesson and course planning, assessment and use of data to improve instruction, integration of classroom technology, reading in the content areas, and classroom management. Students will conduct analyses of teaching theory and practice, create and analyze lesson design using an edTPA model, and analyze unit structures and resources through a series of authentic tasks. Additional work aligned with the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards criteria will be required. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 520 or 522. Prerequisite: Education 413 and 415 with a grade of B- or better and second year MAT licensure candidate status.
cross listed: EDUC 419


EDUC 520: Disc Spec Mthds Teach Adols

(Discipline-Specific Methods for Teaching Adolescents) This graduate seminar focuses on approaches and methodology in the teaching of the content area of licensure. Students will explore research-based instructional theories central to their teaching discipline, subject matter-specific ways of constructing knowledge, and specific methods of inquiry and assessment for learning in a particular subject field. Students will conduct research on an area of study relevant to their discipline, present content-area demonstration lessons, and construct a culminating unit demonstrating best practices for teaching in their disciplines. In addition, each student will be assigned a clinical placement in an adolescent classroom for observation hours and consultation with a field-based faculty mentor in connection with the class. Additional work aligned with the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards criteria will be required. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 519. Prerequisite: Education 413 and 415 with a grade of B- or better and second year MAT licensure candidate status.


EDUC 521: Studnt Teach in Adol Classroom

(Student Teaching in Adolescent Classrooms) Full-day supervised teaching for 14 weeks at the appropriate grade level in a cooperating school and a weekly seminar. This course is graded only on a SCR/D/Fail basis. (There will be a licensure portfolio scoring fee for this class of $300.) Prerequisite: Education 519/520 or 522 with a grade of B- or better. Cross-listed as: EDUC 421
cross listed: EDUC 421


EDUC 522: Discipline-Specific K-12 Curri

(Discipline-Specific K-12 Curriculum and Instructional Design) This graduate seminar focuses on approaches and methodology in the teaching of the content area of licensure. Students will explore research-based instructional theories central to their teaching discipline, subject matter-specific ways of constructing knowledge, and specific methods of inquiry and assessment for learning in a particular subject field. Students will conduct research on an area of study relevant to their discipline, present content-area demonstration lessons, and construct a culminating unit demonstrating best practices for teaching in their disciplines. In addition, each student will be assigned two clinical placements: one in a high school for observation hours and consultation with a field-based faculty mentor; and one in an elementary school for a practicum teaching experience with a mentor teacher and a college supervisor. Additional work aligned with the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards criteria will be required. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 519. Prerequisite: Education 413 and 415 with a grade of B- or better and second year MAT licensure candidate status.
cross listed: EDUC 422


EDUC 548: ADV. SEM.: ESL/Bilingual Education

(Advanced Seminar: English as a Second Language and Bilingual Education.) The growing linguistic and cultural diversity of U.S. student population calls for responsive teachers to nurture students' rich and diverse linguistic and cultural assets. In this course, teacher candidates will study theories and practices of language acquisition and multiliteracy, such as research-based models of bilingual education and literacy instruction in English Learner (EL) students' primary language(s) and in English. The course focuses on instruction and assessment of content in the primary language(s) of EL students and in English. Assessment tools and techniques, as well as issues related to bias, reliability, and validity will be addressed. Additional topics include additive and subtractive theories of bilingual/multilingual education, support for English Language Learners and their families, multilingualism, translanguaging, and recognition of ESL students' cultural and linguistic assets. Prerequisites: EDUC 303/403 and EDUC 304/404 OR EDUC 313/413 and EDUC 315/415. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Humanities and Domestic Pluralism requirements.)
cross listed: EDUC 448


EDUC 548: ADV. SEM.: ESL/Bilingual Educa

(Advanced Seminar: English as a Second Language and Bilingual Education.) The growing linguistic and cultural diversity of U.S. student population calls for responsive teachers to nurture students' rich and diverse linguistic and cultural assets. In this course, teacher candidates will study theories and practices of language acquisition and multiliteracy, such as research-based models of bilingual education and literacy instruction in English Learner (EL) students' primary language(s) and in English. The course focuses on instruction and assessment of content in the primary language(s) of EL students and in English. Assessment tools and techniques, as well as issues related to bias, reliability, and validity will be addressed. Additional topics include additive and subtractive theories of bilingual/multilingual education, support for English Language Learners and their families, multilingualism, translanguaging, and recognition of ESL students' cultural and linguistic assets. Prerequisites: EDUC 303/403 and EDUC 304/404 OR EDUC 313/413 and EDUC 315/415. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Humanities and Domestic Pluralism requirements.)
cross listed: EDUC 448


EDUC 586: ADV SEM: Learning Behv. Specls

(Advanced Seminar: Learning Behavior Specialist 1 (Special Education)). All learners are unique in their backgrounds, dispositions, and needs. To nurture and support these individual dynamics within a school context, special educators bring a deep understanding of learning differences, professional expertise as teachers, and an ethic of care to support diverse students, including those with Individualized Education Program (IEPs) and/or 504 Plans to succeed both in integrated learning contexts and beyond. This course is designed to expand the depth and knowledge of the foundational skills and learner characteristics introduced in the Inclusive Learning Environments (EDUC 314/414) course. It emphasizes educational and behavioral assessment; using data to plan instruction and write data-based goals; the use of evidence-based instructional and behavioral interventions; progress monitoring; and the role of collaboration and consultation in supporting students with diverse abilities. Prerequisites: EDUC 210 and EDUC 414.
cross listed: EDUC 486