COVID-19 precautions and policies are in place to ensure the health and safety of our campus community. Information can be found on our main COVID-19 page

Requirements

Major and Minor in Area Studies

Requirements for the Major:

At least 10 credits

Tools (2 credits)
  • One survey course selected from the following
    • History 110: Global Change: The Power of History
    • Politics 110: Introduction to Global Politics
    • Politics 140: Introduction to Comparative Politics
    • Sociology and Anthropology 110: Introduction to Sociology and Anthropology
  • One research methods course to complement the student's program
    • Communication 256 Communication Research Methods (prerequisite of Communication 110: Introduction to Communication)
    • History 300: The Historian's Workshop (prerequisite of an introductory history course)
    • Politics 200: Methods of Political Research
    • Sociology and Anthropology 310: Social Research: Quantitative Methods (prerequisite of Sociology & Anthropology 110 AND any Sociology and Anthropology 200-level elective, both with a grade of C or better. Required: an additional weekly lab session)
    • Sociology and Anthropology 320: Social Research: Qualitiative Methods (prerequisite of Sociology & Anthropology 110 AND any Sociology and Anthropology 200-level elective, both with a grade of C or better. Required: an additional weekly lab session)
Interdisciplinary study of the selected area (a minimum of 7 credits)
  • With their advisors, Area Studies majors will tailor programs appropriate to their areas, using existing courses in the College curriculum. The goal is to provide the students with a deep and well-rounded understanding of the area's history, society, political economy, and culture, including the religion(s), art and literature. The specific mix of courses will vary depending on courses relevant to the target area offered by various College departments, but breadth across multiple disciplines is encouraged. Appropriate courses often can be found in the offerings of Religion, Art History, Politics, History, Modern Languages and Literatures, and Sociology and Anthropology, but may also be found in Economics, Education, Music Philosophy, and other departments. Students can take courses that cover material across many regions, for instance urbanization, but arrange in advance with the instructor to focus on the target area by writing papers on that area. Tutorials and independent research projects on the area may round out a student's program.  At least three of these seven courses must be at the 300-level or higher.
  • Study abroad programs can greatly enrich an Area Studies program and are strongly encouraged, but we recognize that not all students are able to include such a program in their educational plans. Courses taken in a study abroad program may be counted toward the major if approved by the Area Studes advisor.

Language of the area - basic competency to the intermediate level
  • If the appropriate language is taught on campus, the student must complete courses in the language at least through the intermediate level. Further study in the language in 300-level courses or in a study abroad program is highly encouraged. Only courses in the language at or above the second half of the intermediate sequence may be counted towards the major.
    • Students who are native speakers of an appropriate language may present that for competency.
    • Language courses take as part of study abroad programs offer another means for students to gain language competency.
Senior Studies (1 credit)
  • The capstone for the major is normally a senior thesis or a significant research project. Area Studies does not offer its own senior seminar.
    • In some cases, a student may be permitted to take a senior seminar offered in another department, assuming the course may be modified to allow the student to focus on the targe area. 
    • Students double majoring in Area Studies and another major cannot count the same senior seminar towards the Senior Studies requirement of both majors.

Requirements for the Minor:

At least 6 credits

Tools (1 credit)
  • One survey course selected from the following
    • History 110: Global Change: The Power of History
    • Politics 110: Introduction to Global Politics
    • Politics 140: Introduction to Comparative Politics
    • Sociology and Anthropology 110: Introduction to Sociology and Anthropology
Interdisciplinary study of the selected area (a minimum of 5 credits)
  • With their advisors, Area Studies majors will tailor programs appropriate to their areas, using existing courses in the College curriculum. The goal is to provide the students with a deep and well-rounded understanding of the area's history, society, political economy, and culture, including the religion(s), art and literature. The specific mix of courses will vary depending on courses relevant to the target area offered by various College departments. Appropriate courses often can be found in the offerings of Religion, Art History, Politics, History, Modern Languages and Literatures, and Sociology and Anthropology, but may also be found in Economics, Education, Music Philosophy, and other departments. At least one of these seven courses must be at the 300-level or higher.
  • Study abroad programs can greatly enrich an Area Studies program and are strongly encouraged, but we recognize that not all students are able to include such a program in their educational plans. Courses taken in a study abroad program may be counted toward the major if approved by the Area Studes advisor.
  • While there is no language competency requirement for the Area Studies minor, familiarity with the language is encouraged.

Examples of possible Area Studies concentrations:
  • African Studies:  Combines coursework and experiential learning in politics, economics, history, literature, sociology and anthropology, and religion, along with Arabic when doing a North African focus.
  • European Studies:  Combines coursework with off-campus experiences in a language with courses in history, politics, literature, art, economics, and philosophy. 
  • Middle Eastern Studies:  Combines courses in Arabic, politics, economics, and religion with work in history and sociology and anthropology, and potential off-campus experience.
  • Russian and East European Studies:  Combines courses in history, politics, economics, religion, and literature, and potential off-campus experience.
  • Analysis of a global issue, such as economic development, immigration, health care, hunger, clean water, human trafficking, foreign trade, or microfinance through related coursework, independent research and experiential learning.

Area Studies students will determine, in consultation with the Chair of Area Studies, the official name of the major or minor that will appear on the transcript.  The region or topic of emphasis will be included, such as Area Studies: Eastern Europe, Area Studies: African Health Care, or Area Studies: Middle East.