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Course Descriptions

The course descriptions below are part of the standard pre-nursing curriculum at Lake Forest College and are not associated with any particular program or partnership. 

COLL 105:  Nursing Professional Development

Nurses are at the front lines of America’s healthcare delivery systems.  As such, they need superior skills in communication, advocacy, and team-building.  They need strong resiliency skills to manage the stressors of patient healthcare management.  This course is designed to build these essential skills for students who are admitted into our nursing program. 

Course content will include guest speakers who are nurses on topics like organizational skills, communication skills, and resiliency in preparation for upcoming summer internship and mentorship experiences.  The Office of Intercultural Affairs will assist with course content to build community and help students integrate their cultural identities with their desire to be part of the nursing profession.  Academic advisors from the Pre-Health program will help students assess their readiness for the next stages of the nursing program. 


BIOL 120: Organismal Biology

This course will address the organization and function of multicellular organisms. Although focused primarily on plants and animals, other kinds of organisms will be discussed. Regulation, homeostasis, and integration of function; nutrient acquisition, processing, and assimilation; photosynthesis; gas exchange; reproductive patterns; and development are all topics that are included in this course. Readings from an introductory text and the secondary and primary scientific literature will be required. Students must also register for a lab. Prerequisite: Science placement test required. Please see the Requirements page on the Biology Department website for details. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Natural Sciences requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Natural Science & Mathematics requirement.)


CHEM 115: Chemistry I

An introduction to and study of the fundamental concepts and principles of chemistry. Atomic and molecular structure, periodic relationships, chemical bonding, stoichiometry. Properties and theories of gases, liquids, and solids. Laboratory introduces quantitative measurements and computer applications. This course will meet admissions requirements for medical, dental, or pharmacy school. Three class meetings, one laboratory per week. Students must register for a lab. Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on the departmental placement test to assess quantitative skills or a passing grade in Chemistry 114. Please see Chemistry Department requirements page for details. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Natural Sciences requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Natural Science & Mathematics requirement.)


CHEM 116: Chemistry II

Thermodynamics and kinetics; chemical equilibria; acids, bases, and buffers; coordination compounds; descriptive chemistry of metals and nonmetals. Laboratory is both quantitative and descriptive and uses much instrumentation. Three class meetings, one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 115. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Natural Sciences requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Natural Science & Mathematics requirement.)


HPPC 208: Human Anatomy

This course introduces the structure of mammalian bodies, with particular emphasis on the human body. All of the major body systems (skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, etc.) are covered. Lab includes dissection and study of representative mammalian specimens, as well as study of human skeletons and models. Class meets seven hours per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 120, CHEM 115. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Natural Sciences requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Natural Science & Mathematics requirement.)
cross listed: BIOL 208L


HPPC 209: Human Physiology

This course begins with a review of the cellular processes that influence the survival of all physiological systems in the human body. Following that foundation, a deeper exploration into the function of each major system is emphasized. The lecture component includes the functional study of muscular, neurophysiological, special sensory, immune, endocrine, hematologic, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Metabolomics, fluid-electrolyte and acid-base balance is incorporated into their respective physiological systems. Lab focuses on physiological experimentation and application. This course is intended primarily for students who aspire to enter into health fields. Prerequisites: BIOL120, CHEM115. BIOL 208 is recommended.
cross-listed: BIOL 209


HPPC 210: Microbiology

This course focuses on the biology of single-celled organisms, with an emphasis on bacteria and infectious diseases. Topics include antibiotic mechanisms and resistance, bacterial gene swapping, epidemiology, host-microbe interactions, and the immune response. Several weeks of independent study allow students to isolate, research, and identify three bacterial species. Three lectures and four laboratory hours per week. This course fulfills the prerequisite for microbiology in the health professions. Prerequisites: BIOL 221, and either BIOL 220 or Junior status. Students must also register for a lab.
cross listed: BMB 323


BIOL 323: Microbiology

This course focuses on the biology of single-celled organisms, with emphasis on bacteria and infectious disease. Topics include antibiotic mechanisms and resistance, bacterial gene swapping, epidemiology, host-microbe interactions, and the immune response. Several weeks of independent study allow students to isolate, research, and identify three bacterial species. Three lecture and four laboratory hours per week. This course fulfills the pre-requisite for microbiology in the health professions. Prerequisites: BIOL 221, and either BIOL 220 or Junior status. Students must also register for a lab.
cross listed: BMB 323 


BIOL 340: Animal Physiology

This course focuses on mechanisms of homeostasis in vertebrates and invertebrates. A particular emphasis is placed on examining specific adaptations (functional, morphological, and behavioral) to different environmental conditions, as well as problems associated with physical size. Topics include integration and response to stimuli, gas exchange, circulation, movement, buoyancy, metabolism, thermal regulation, osmoregulation, and excretion. Three lecture and four laboratory hours per week. This course fulfills the pre-requisite for physiology in the health professions. Prerequisites: BIOL 221, and either BIOL 220 or Junior status. (Under the old GEC, this course meets the Natural Science & Mathematics requirement.)
cross listed: NEUR 340, BMB 340


MATH 150: Intro Probability & Statistics

Designed for students in the social and life sciences. Discrete probability theory, distributions, sampling, correlation, and regression, Chi square and other tests of significance. Emphasis on the use of the computer as a tool and on applications to a variety of disciplines. Not open to students who have taken ECON/BUSN 180 or ECON/BUSN/FIN 130. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Natural Science & Mathematics requirement.)


ECON 130: Applied Statistics

Distribution analysis, sampling theory, statistical inference, and regression analysis, with emphasis on the application of statistical techniques using spreadsheet software to analyze economic and business issues. Students who have taken this course will not receive credit for MATH 150. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)
cross listed: BUSN 130, FIN 130


PSYC 221: Research Methods & Statistics I

An introduction to the basic research methods and statistical techniques used in psychology. In the first semester, the primary focus will be on descriptive and relational methods (e.g., naturalistic observation, surveys, correlational designs) and descriptive statistics. In the second semester the primary focus will be on controlled experiments and inferential statistics. The course sequence includes a required laboratory component in which students gain hands-on experience using statistical software to analyze psychological data. Prerequisite for 221: Psychology 110 with a grade of at least C-. Psychology 221 and 222 must be taken in sequence. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Natural Sciences and Technology requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.