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Course Descriptions

EDUC 320: Comparative and International Educ

(Comparative and International Education: Education as the Practice of Freedom) This course examines both the study and practice of comparative and international education. The course is organized with a multidisciplinary perspective with analysis of history, theory, methods, and issues in comparative and international education. A major goal of the course is to interrogate the linkages between education and society. Recurrent themes will be examined to demonstrate how every educational system not only arises from but also shapes its particular socio-cultural context. Students will have the opportunity to deepen and expand their knowledge of educational issues within a global context. Not open to first year students. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences and Global Perspectives requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science and Cultural Diversity requirements.)
cross listed: ETHC 330, SOAN 344, IREL 395


EDUC 322: Education in Developing Countries

(Education and Development in Developing Countries) This course explores the historical background, philosophical foundations and major themes in the education of 'developing countries' within the broader context of global development and social change. The specific goal of this course is to familiarize students with the evolution of and critical issues in formal education in most low income, less industrialized nations. Students will be able to explore contemporary themes in education from a historical and comparative perspective. Additionally, they will expand their conceptual schema for rethinking educational issues within and beyond their own societies. Geographically, this course covers countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America, but runs comparisons with countries in Europe and North America when theoretically relevant. Reading materials build on development studies and several disciplines in the social sciences and humanities such as history, philosophy, anthropology, sociology and education. Not open to first year students. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences and Global Perspectives requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science and Cultural Diversity requirements.)
cross listed: SOAN 343


ES 210: Environmental Ethics

Examination of relationships between human beings and nature, drawing on literature, religion, and natural science as well as philosophy. What views have shaped our current perceptions, concerns, uses, and misuses of the natural world? What creative alternatives can we discover? How can these be applied to the practical problems of environmental ethics? (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Humanities and Global Perspectives requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities requirement.)
cross listed: PHIL 210


ES 215: Environmental Psychology

Environmental psychology is the discipline concerned with interactions and relationships between people and their environments (including built, natural, and social environments). In this course we apply psychological methods and theories to a variety of issues and behaviors, considering such topics as landscape preference, wayfinding, weather, noise, natural disasters, territoriality, crowding, and the design of residential and work environments. We also explore images of nature, wilderness, home, and place, as well as the impact of these images on behavior. The course is grounded in empirical work, and incorporates observations and experiences in the local environment. No prerequisite. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)
cross listed: PSYC 215


ES 236: Environmental Politics and Policy

This course provides an overview of environmental politics and policy in the United States, with an emphasis on the ways in which policies are developed and implemented at the local, state, and national levels. Special attention is paid to the diversity of actors that shape environmental outcomes, including legislators, administrators, the science community, civil society, and the private sector. This course examines environmental politics and policy in the United States from the roots of environmental policymaking present at the country's founding through the emergence of the "modern" environmental movement in the post-World War II era that led to the raft of environmental legislation we have today. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)
cross listed: POLS 237


ES 263: American Cities

This course is an introduction to the political, economic, and social forces that have shaped American cities from the colonial era to the present, with a focus on the city of Chicago. We explore the growth of urban economies and new forms of labor, migration and immigration into cities, persistent patterns of racial/ethnic segregation and displacement, and struggles over power and resources that make up urban politics. We also pay particular attention to urban geography and the relationship between cities, rural and suburban areas. Students are introduced to multiple disciplinary approaches to understanding American cities, and take field trips to relevant sites in Chicago. This course is the foundational course for the Urban Studies minor program. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Humanities and Domestic Pluralism requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities requirement.)
cross listed: HIST 235, AMER 263, URBS 120


ES 361: Environmental Law

This course will explore basic issues of law and policy involved in the consumption, conservation, and regulation of natural resources. In particular, we will consider how various competing public and private interests in the use and protection of the environment affect legislative, administrative, and judicial decision making. Topics to be discussed include: agency management of environmental risk; civil suits as a means of environmental law enforcement; wilderness and the use of public land; takings and other private property rights concerns; federalism and the environment. Among other statutes, we will examine the National Environmental Policy Act, the Clean Air Act, the Wilderness Act, the Endangered Species Act, and the Toxic Substances Control Act.
cross listed: POLS 368


HIST 312: Immigration in U.S. History

The United States has had exceptionally high levels of immigration and internal geographic mobility from the colonial period to the present. Placing the geographic area that would become the United States into a global frame, this course explores patterns of European, Asian, and Latin American migration into a land already inhabited by mobile indigenous populations, the forced migration of enslaved Africans to the U.S. and later migration of black citizens northward, as well as the movement of migrants over the long-contested (and moving) U.S.-Mexico border. We learn about the politics of migration, including the long history of anti-immigrant nativism and xenophobia in the United States, as well as the role of migrants in shaping major U.S. social and political movements. We also examine how ethnic, racial, and national identities - including "American"-are not fixed categories, but rather constructed and reconstructed over time. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Domestic Pluralism and Speaking requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities and Cultural Diversity requirements.)
cross listed: AMER 355


HIST 319: Protest and Police in U.S. History

This course examines historical instances of policing, inequality, and protest, including mobs in the American Revolution, abolitionist direct actions, the terror of the Klu Klux Klan, sit-ins against Jim Crow, protest against military action, and the #BlackLivesMatter movement. Throughout U.S. history, Americans have been committed both to protest and disruption in order to advance their causes, and to stability, security, and the maintenance of order. Despite widespread fears about disorder and crime today, Americans in the past were far more violent. In this course, we will trace how ordinary people came together to challenge authority, and how those with power built state structures that could legitimately use violence. We will see how policing was shaped by fears of newly- arrived immigrants, the demands of a slave economy, and entrenched racism. We will study the intersecting histories of race, inequality, and state power across the American past. Students will develop a major research project on a particular historical instance of policing, inequality, and protest. Prerequisite: HIST 200 or HIST 201 or permission of instructor. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Domestic Pluralism and Writing requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities and Cultural Diversity requirements.)
cross listed: AMER 319, AFAM 319


HIST 340: Topics in East Asian History

(Topics in East Asian History). Fall 2022 Topic: China's Cultural Revolution.The Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, broke out more than forty years ago (1966-1976), has been recognized as the darkest era in the history of the People's Republic of China. A comprehensive mass movement initiated by Mao Zedong to eliminate the so-called 'counterrevolutionary elements' in the country's institutions and leadership, the revolution was characterized by nationwide chaos, ultra-leftist frenzy, political zealotry, purges of intellectuals, extreme social turmoil, and ultimate economic collapse. This course intends to reconstruct the history of the Cultural Revolution by revealing the causes of the calamity and prevent human disaster from repeating itself in the future. Prerequisite: One course in Asian history or permission of the instructor. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Global Perspectives requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities and Cultural Diversity requirements.)
cross listed: ASIA 307, IREL 330


PHIL 200: Philosophy & Gender

What is gender? Is it the same as one's sex? Is it inborn or learned? In this course, we'll investigate these questions, as well as how gender differences do or ought to change our theories of human existence and human good. A comparison of classical, modern, and postmodern treatments of the effect of gender on love, knowledge, and ethical obligation. Reading may include Plato, Aristotle, Rousseau, Mary Shelley, Freud, de Beauvoir, and Irigaray. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Humanities and Domestic Pluralism requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities and Cultural Diversity requirements.)
cross listed: GSWS 200


PHIL 240: Philosophy of Law

This course considers (1) the nature or concept of law, (2) whether and to what extent there is a duty to obey the law, (3) the nature of legal adjudication, (4) the bases for ascription of legal responsibility for acts or omissions, and (5) the justification or lack thereof for legally assigned punishments. We read philosophical and legal texts, and we also consider a few literary and cinematic representations of law and its discontents. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Humanities requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities requirement.)


PHIL 242: Catastrophe & Risk: Phil Insurance

(Catastrophe and Risk: The Philosophy of Insurance.) This course examines the institution of insurance philosophically. Beginning with a consideration of the problem of induction, and ranging over philosophical discourses about miracles, apocalypse, and the nature of prediction, the course ponders the ways in which the concept of rationality is shaped, both by our knowledge and by our ignorance. The course explores the concepts of risk and luck, considering the extent to which political and social institutions can and should be used as risk-pooling devices to soften the effects of catastrophe and to buffer the effects of luck. We also pay some attention to insurance law, to the relationship between entrepreneurial projections and actuarial calculations, and to representations of insurance in literature and film. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Humanities requirement.)


PHIL 245: Philosophy of Humans and Animals

Western philosophers since Aristotle - at least - have claimed that human beings, as a species and alone among species, are capable of complex reasoning. From that premise, they have inferred a wide range of ethical and religious claims, e.g., it is ethically permissible to eat non-human animals. Alternative claims, however, have just as long a history, and in the last twenty or so years there has been a boom in the study of non-human animals and the relationships between humans and non-human animals. Not open to students who have taken Phil 420: Philosophy of Humans and Animals. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Humanities requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities requirement.)


PHIL 255: Philosophy of Race and Racism

This course examines philosophical approaches to race and racism. We pay special attention to the normative, metaphysical, and conceptual problems and solutions that inform philosophical race theory. Some of the key questions we answer include the following: Is race a natural kind, a social kind, or something else entirely? What does philosophy have to contribute to the study of race and racism? What is the relationship between race and racism? We draw on readings from the history of philosophy, mainstream analytic philosophy, and recent European philosophy. Ultimately, the aim of this course is to provide students with a philosophical toolkit that will allow them to engage in civil and informed critical discussions about the nature and consequences of race talk and the practice of racism. No prerequisites. (Not recommended for first-year students.) (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Humanities and Domestic Pluralism requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities and Cultural Diversity requirements.)
cross listed: AFAM 255


PHIL 276: Social Justice and Human Rights

Examination of the concepts and debates surrounding social justice and human rights, with attention to the arguments between East and West. Applications to current global and domestic issues, such as globalization; poverty and disparities in wealth and opportunity; race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation; political liberties; and genocide. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Humanities and Domestic Pluralism requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities requirement.)
cross listed: ETHC 276, IREL 286


PHIL 277: Identities, Rights, Social Justice

This course explores the philosophical foundations of contemporary understandings of rights and social justice. We study a variety of theoretical frameworks, including classical liberal theory, postcolonial critiques, and local philosophies of indigenous communities. Moreover, we consider the effects of each framework on various claims to identity, whether of an individual person, a group, community, institution, place, or state. We then attempt to apply these frameworks to a number of real-world cases to better understand how rights are deployed and denied in practice. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Humanities and Domestic Pluralism requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities requirement.)
cross listed: ETHC 277, IREL 287


POLS 221: The Presidency

The president is the symbolic leader of the federal government but, compared to Congress, the framers of the U.S. Constitution intended the executive to be the weaker branch of the national government. This course examines the growth and accumulation of presidential power and the implications of a strong executive for domestic politics and America's foreign relations. It also considers relations between the institution of the presidency and the courts, the media, and the people. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)
cross listed: AMER 221


POLS 222: Congress

A glance at the enumerated powers granted the legislative branch under the U.S. Constitution suggests Congress is the strongest of the three branches of the national government. Yet the power of Congress is divided between two chambers, and the vast majority of legislation proposed in either chamber never becomes law. Congress is supposed to represent the interests of the people of the various states - and yet its public standing is nowadays at an historic low. This course examines the basic operations, structure, power dynamics, and politics of the U.S. House of Representatives and the Senate. It also considers the rivalry and relationship between Congress and the President. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)
cross listed: AMER 222


POLS 223: LGBTQ Politics

This course explores the evolution of LGBTQ political movements and LGBTQ rights in the United States. It examines a variety of LGBTQ political issues at both the state and national level. Students learn how different political institutions have shaped LGBTQ rights in the United States and what tools and strategies the LGBTQ community has utilized when advocating for their rights. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences and Domestic Pluralism requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)


POLS 224: Mass Media and American Politics

An analysis of the influence of the mass media on American political institutions and American attitudes. Topics include First Amendment issues, political campaigns, political movements, public opinion, advertising, and entertainment. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)
cross listed: AMER 225


POLS 225: Influence and Interest Groups

Organized interests shape American campaigns and candidates, citizen attitudes, and policy at every level of government; the power of these groups lies in their numbers, their dollars and their organization. This course introduces the intellectual traditions and debates that have characterized the study of interest groups and their influence on public policy, political opinion, and political actors, and will compare theory to practice in the American political experience. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)
cross listed: AMER 242


POLS 226: Public Policy Studies

This course focuses on how public officials address policy problems, and why they select the solutions they do. We examine the public policymaking process, paying particular attention to the role played by political actors (elected officials, interest groups, governmental agencies) seeking to influence the tone and direction of policy. Attention will also be paid to how particular policy issues and problems gain (or fail to gain) the public's attention, including the role that political elites and the media play in agenda setting. Finally, the course assesses the effects of public polices on citizens' lives. In doing so, students will assume the role of "policy analyst," learning how to write briefs in which they evaluate various policy reforms. In sum, students will gain the necessary tools to systematically assess when a public policy is achieving its desired goals and whether it is being implemented effectively and efficiently. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)


POLS 233: Chicago Politics

This course is an introduction to Chicago politics. We will focus on contemporary relationships among business, labor, environmentalists, and other social groups, including those groups based on ethnicity, race, and sexual identity. We will examine the mobilization of and current relations between major political players and interest groups. Students will also explore important historical elements of Chicago politics such as the Daley family and the rise of the Democratic Machine or the election of Harold Washington and the ensuing 'council wars.' (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)


POLS 234: Urban Politics

This course examines problems of political and social organization in central cities. Topics include political machines, mayors, public policy issues, race & politics, and racial coalition politics. (Not open to students who have completed POLS 223.) (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences and Domestic Pluralism requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)


POLS 240: American Foreign Policy

Students in this course explore the major historical developments and ideologies that have shaped American foreign policy since the founding of the Republic. We also study the models of foreign policy decision-making and the foreign policy institutions of the national government on matters related to war and national security, trade and monetary policy, and the global environment. The role of civil society in foreign policy is also considered. Special emphasis is given to the post- 9/11 era. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)
cross listed: AMER 241, IREL 240


POLS 243: Fake News, Free Speech

(Fake News, Free Speech and Foreign Influence in American Democracy.) This course focuses on contemporary issues facing public discourse in the United States and explores the dangers inherent in online content. We discuss such questions as: What are the strengths and weaknesses of using internet technology to organize people? How do social media platforms and their ad-driven algorithms bias our worldview? How are democratic elections and mass protests shaped by your unique news feeds? A constitutional perspective on freedom of speech and the press is presented. Substantive topics include analysis of online social movements, legal analysis of federal regulation of social media, federal election law, foreign interference in national politics, and a technical review of social media platforms. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)


POLS 247: Transnational Social Movements

This course examines the emergence, evolution, and impact of transnational social movements, in which activists mobilize across national boundaries to effect global change. It explores the interaction of transnational social movements with other global actors, such as states and international organizations; the ways in which social media, technology, and globalization have changed the methods of organizing and efficacy of these movements; and the impact of these movements on global norms. We assess a wide variety of cases, such as #MeToo, human rights in Argentina, the anti-whaling movement, and transnational peace movements. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences and Global Perspectives requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science and Cultural Diversity requirements.)
cross listed: IREL 247


POLS 265: Immigration Law and Policy

This course provides an in-depth understanding of our current U.S. immigration regime using a multi-disciplinary approach. It explores the range of policy issues affecting today's immigrants and nonimmigrants. The course examines the fundamental principles of immigration law in the context of competing interests among Congress, the President, and the Judiciary that shape this nation's current immigration policy and affect reform efforts. Additionally, the course focuses on the human rights aspect of immigration, including issues related to the treatment of undocumented immigrants, human trafficking, and the system's response to the recent influx of refugees and asylum seekers. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences and Domestic Pluralism requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science and Cultural Diversity requirements.)
cross listed: AMER 277


POLS 345: Migration and Citizenship

Migration across national boundaries is one of the fundamental issues in global politics of our time. What factors shape global migration flows? How do different countries regulate migration? How do states decide who belongs and who does not? Who is kept out and who is let in? How do immigration policies reflect the notion of citizenship? Can citizenship be earned, bought, or sold? This course examines causes and consequences of global migration and dilemmas associated with them in comparative perspective. Through case studies from various regions of the world, including Europe, North America, Latin America, Asia, Africa, and Middle East, students gain understanding of global patterns of migration flows, as well as how states and societies respond to them and are transformed by them. Prerequisite: POLS 110 or POLS 140 or approval of the instructor. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Global Perspectives and Writing requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science and Cultural Diversity requirements.)
cross listed: IREL 350


PPCY 100: Public Policy Incubator

This course emulates the kind of work taking place at thinktanks, non-government organizations, government agencies, and political offices. After a four-week introduction to a particular public policy issue, students work in our "public policy incubator" to produce white papers on an array of issues. Policy and industry leaders join regularly to help students hone their analysis in ways that allow for real-world consideration and discussion by policy makers. Teams produce white papers with executive summaries and develop presentations of their analyses. All teams are required to submit their work to the College’s annual Public Policy Challenge. White papers are also presented to external policy makers. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Experiential Learning requirement.)


PSYC 355: Community Psychology

Community Psychologists study individuals in the contexts of their communities - e.g., families, peer groups, schools, workplaces, religious groups, culture, and society - and strive to engage collaboratively in research and community action work to ameliorate social problems, enhance the overall well-being of the community and its members, and make positive public policy changes. In this course, we will: (1) Consider the goals and roles of Community Psychologists; (2) Examine how social structures and community problems affect individuals' lives, and analyze our own underlying assumptions about these issues; (3) Consider the importance of diversity and psychological sense of community; (4) Explore methods & strategies for citizen participation and social change; and (5) Learn to use psychological research to inform social policy change and prevention efforts. Topics may include: Family Violence; Foster Care; Racism & the Justice System; Community Organizing for Rights (e.g., Civil Rights, Workers' Rights, Women's Rights); Community Organizing Against Harms (e.g., Hazardous Waste); Community Mental Health; Poverty & Homelessness; Children and Welfare Reform; Community Violence Prevention; Adaptation and Coping with Disaster (e.g., 9/11, Hurricane Katrina); and Advocacy on Capitol Hill - The Tobacco Lobby and Teenage Smoking. Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or equivalent. . (Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science and Cultural Diversity requirements.)
cross listed: GSWS 355


PSYC 430: Psychology and Law

An examination of psycholegal research, theory, and practice. Sample topics include: psychological testing in education and employment; clinical assessments of insanity, competence, and dangerousness; eyewitness testimony; polygraphs and lie detection; psychological profiling; the psychology of false confessions; psychologists as trial consultants; jury decision making; capital punishment; and discrimination in the legal system. As we survey the field we will consider how psychology can help the law and how studying the law enriches psychology. Prerequisite: Psychology 222 with a grade of at least C- or advanced standing in another major, with permission of the instructor. Preference in registration to graduating seniors majoring in psychology. (Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)


PSYC 450: Health Psychology

This course explores a variety of research and clinical issues in health psychology. Representative topics include the role of behavior in health and disease, the neurobiology of emotion, the major stress-related and behavior-related disorders (e.g., coronary heart disease, cancer, headaches, AIDS), prevention strategies, and psychologically based treatment approaches. Our primary focus will be a methodological and conceptual analysis of the health psychology literature, which we will consider from a scientific perspective. An understanding of these issues, however, should help you become a more critical consumer of health information and health advice offered by the media, and may inspire you to make positive changes in your own health-related behavior and lifestyle. Prerequisite: Psychology 222 with a grade of at least C- or advanced standing in another major, with permission of the instructor. Preference in registration to graduating seniors majoring in psychology or neuroscience. (Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)


PSYC 470: Gender-Based Violence

Gender-based violence is a global problem that occurs in many forms (e.g., dating violence, intimate partner violence, and sexual assault). In this course we examine psychological research and theory on gender-based violence perpetration, prevention, and treatment. In this examination, we consider: the prevalence of gender-based violence; the influence of the media influences; the roles of ethnicity, sexual orientation, and culture; the effects of gender-based violence on mental and physical health; and the helpful and unhelpful ways in which communities respond to such violence. Prerequisite: Psychology 222 with a grade of at least C- or advanced standing in another major, with permission of the instructor. Preference in registration will be given to graduating seniors majoring in psychology. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Domestic Pluralism requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science and Cultural Diversity requirements.)


RELG 239: Religion, Biology, & Public Health

This course examines religion as a social determinant of public health and introduces students to meditation and other mind-body practices, which have been successfully applied in medical settings. Students analyze selected practices of ordinary people in Buddhism, Taoism, Islam, and Christianity that shape health behaviors; assess the role of religious organizations in ongoing epidemic threats (COVID-19, HIV/AIDS, and Alzheimer's); and study connections between religion and public health (e.g., legacy of the social gospel movement in US Public Health Reform, impact of religious views on reproductive health, and application of meditation techniques in health care). Using an innovative methodology called Reacting to the Past, students delve into key historical moments that shaped modern approaches to biology, public health, and epidemiology, participating in extended role-playing games informed by influential texts in the history of ideas. Assessments include a sequence of verbal and written assignments, culminating in a final oral presentation. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Global Perspectives and Speaking requirements.)


SOAN 240: Deviance

How society defines deviants - its outcasts and outsiders - and how the people so defined respond to this categorization; the nature of normal and abnormal, legal and illegal. Do these categories have absolute moral meaning, or do they always depend on the particular society and era in which they are defined? Topics to be addressed include stigma and stereotyping, cross-cultural variations in gender roles, the status of the inmate, deviance as blocked opportunity, and the political mobilization of outsiders. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences and Domestic Pluralism requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science and Cultural Diversity requirements.)


SOAN 290: Social Problems & Social Policy

The course tracks the shifting sociological understanding of social problems in the United States and the implications for research and policy. Specifically, emphasis is placed on a balance between theoretical understandings and empirical investigation on topics ranging from family to the environment. Prerequisite: SOAN 110. Enrollment priority given to departmental majors and minors. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences and Domestic Pluralism requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)


SOAN 395: Sociology of Law

This course will examine the social organization of legal institutions and the relationship between law and the structure of society. Specifically, the course considers the nature and origins of law from the viewpoint of classical social theorists and anthropological studies of customary law. The course also emphasizes various aspects of the American legal system: the social structure of the legal profession, courts and dispute resolution, law as an instrument of social control, and the relationship between law and social change. Prerequisite: SOAN 110. (Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science and Cultural Diversity requirements.)