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Communications and Marketing

Celebrating the English major

The annual English department fall party featured a riveting performance by poet, educator, and activist Kevin Coval followed by food, festivities, and a t-shirt giveaway.

The English department’s fall party is a chance for students and faculty to celebrate the English major. This year’s party took place in Glen Rowan House on September 28 from 4 to 6 p.m.

The party began with announcements from Department of English Chair Carla Arnell, who promoted on-campus organizations Tusitala, INK, and the Book Club, as outlets that may be of interest to English majors. 

Arnell complimented the Stentor, run by English major and editor-in-chief Matt Demirs ’18 and staffed by many other English majors, on having recently published one of its best issues in her memory. Arnell also congratulated English major Tyler Madeley ’18 on directing the upcoming campus production of Macbeth

Senior Lecturer in English and Director of Writing Programs Tracy McCabe then introduced Coval, who is the author or editor of 10 volumes of poetry, the artistic director of Young Chicago Authors, and the founder of Louder Than a Bomb, the world’s largest youth poetry festival.

Coval took the stage to read from A People’s History of Chicago, his latest collection of poetry. Coval explained that he “wrote it to be a history book,” chronicling hundreds of years of Chicago history “from before white folks got here past the Cubs winning the World Series.”

The guest speaker read poems from A People’s History that covered topics ranging from Hugh Hefner to house music to former Chicago mayor Harold Washington before reading some new poems about his time living in Chicago’s Wicker Park neighborhood. 

After the reading, Coval took questions from students and encouraged them all to get down to Chicago and experience the city as often as possible. 

An English department t-shirt giveaway followed while the crowd mingled and took advantage of the free pizza and dessert.

For more information on goings-on in the English department, check out Soundings, their Fall 2017 newsletter.