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Communications and Marketing

Digital Chicago student-created art on display

Original student artwork created for Associate Professor of English Ben Goluboff’s 2015 Digital Chicago project, Two Short Plays, is now on display.

The exhibit features cover art and original illustrations created for “The Wonder Hat” by Jaime Harris (Jaime Deare) ’18, and original illustrations for “Back of the Yards” by Emily Murman ’19.

The artwork created for Two Short Plays (Lake Forest College Press 2016) is on display on the second floor of the Center for Chicago Programs, which is located in the Mohr Student Center’s Stuart Commons.

Harris’s color illustrations will accompany a 1952 radio drama of “The Wonder Hat,” to be released online as part of Digital Chicago: Unearthing History and Culture. Co-written by Goodman and the more well-known Ben Hecht, “The Wonder Hat” features a hat that confers invisibility on the wearer, a pair of star-crossed lovers, and the assurance that love still conquers all.

By contrast, “Back of the Yards” offers a gritty realist drama about Irish Americans in one of Chicago’s toughest neighborhoods, where a cop and a priest collaborate to save a young man at risk.

If you are interested in obtaining a copy of Two Short Plays, please contact Emily Mace in the Center for Chicago Programs. 

Digital Chicago engages students and faculty in exploring forgotten aspects of Chicago’s history through innovative digital humanities projects, urban archeological digs, and coursework in a wide array of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences.

Goluboff, with Chicago Fellows Research Assistant loana Cornea ’16, developed the work as a 2015 Chicago Fellow for Digital Chicago: Unearthing History and Culture, Lake Forest College’s four-year (2015-2018), $800,000 grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.