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The Forest

‘How to do things with a billion words’ talk today

This talk will introduce some of the most cutting-edge digital humanities research coming out of Washington University at 4 p.m., February 20, in Meyer Auditorium. 

Anupam Basu of Washington University and Kate Needham, a PhD candidate at Yale University, will analyze transcribed early English printed texts, showing some of the newest computational analyses and big data research on printed text from the English Renaissance.

The research team has revised longstanding and unexamined critical assumptions of the period, from Edmund Spenser’s supposedly distinctive spelling to wide-scale cultural changes in style and genre.