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Access Summer

Class Schedule

Take a look at the classes offered during Access Summer 2020. There are three terms with a variety of choices. When you register, indicate which courses you’re interested in taking.

Registration is open

Visiting students should use the button at left.

Lake Forest College students must register via my.lakeforest.

 

May Term: May 12 – June 5

Classes meet Tuesday - Friday. No classes on Monday.

 

June Term: June 8 – July 2

Classes meet Monday - Thursday. No classes on Friday.

 

July Term: July 6 – July 30

Classes meet Monday - Thursday. No classes on Friday.

 

*   class required for business majors
#   class can fulfill requirement for business majors
^   no charge for incoming Psychology major transfer students

 

Course Descriptions

ART 142: Digital Design Foundations

Digital Foundations uses formal exercises of the Bauhaus to teach the Adobe Creative Suite. The curriculum decodes digital tools and culture while explaining fundamental visual design principles within a historical context. Students develop an understanding of the basic principles of design in order to implement them using current software. There are no prerequisites for this course. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Creative & Performing Arts and Technology requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities requirement.)

ART 15x: 3D Digital Modelling Foundations

New course. Description coming soon!

ART 243: Video, Sound, and Electronic Art

(Time-Based Media: Video, Sound and Electronic Art)This is an introductory course to time-based media and electronics that help students develop skills and techniques in professional video, sound, and electronic production software and hardware. By putting technology and new media to use in such forms as experimental documentary, video projection, sound installation, and electronic interactivity, we explore the potential of contemporary art practices within and beyond galleries and museums. Once equipped with the professional and creative practices learned in this course, students will have important and highly sought-after skills in a variety of fields including art and technology. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Creative & Performing Arts and Technology requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities requirement.) Cross-listed as: CINE 243.

BIOL 103: Human Biology

This course examines the structure and function of many of the major organ systems of the human body. In so doing, it will introduce students to a range of important topics related to human beings. These will include the nature of science as a discipline, and the biological basis of health, disease, nutrition, exercise, sensation, and reproduction. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Natural Sciences requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Natural Science & Mathematics requirement.)

BIOL 109: Botany for Gardeners

Propagation and growth of plants is key to human history and survival. Students in this course gain the scientific foundation in plant biology required to understand and successfully start, grow, and maintain a variety of plants. Topics include the mechanisms behind plant light and nutrition requirements; plant defense against herbivores and pathogens; propagation of new plants from existing plants; how to grow plants from seed; the science behind garden design and care (indoor and outdoor); the biology of growing fruits and vegetables; requirements of specialty plants like orchids, bonsai, and carnivorous plants; and the effective use of plant growth hormones. This participatory, speaking-intensive course will include both classroom and extensive lab time in the greenhouse and garden, as students learn to prepare pots, mix soils, treat pests, and grow a wide variety of plants, while gaining both the scientific perspective behind why the methods they are learning are effective and the ability to communicate this perspective to a wider audience. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Natural Sciences and Speaking requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Natural Science & Mathematics requirement.)

BUSN 230: Financial Accounting

Methods, practices, and concepts underlying the communication of relevant financial information to external parties. Development of the accounting model, measurement processes, data terminology and classification, internal control, interpretation and uses of financial statements. Prerequisites: ECON 110 and either MATH 110 or MATH 160, both with grades of C- or better. (Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)

BUSN 330: Intermediate Accounting

Accounting concepts, principles, and theory with an emphasis on the special problems that arise in applying these concepts to external reporting. Prerequisites: Business 230 with a grade of C- or better. (Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)

BUSN 331: Managerial Accounting

Use of accounting information for evaluation of planning and control decisions. Topics include budgeting, cost-volume analysis, product costing, and standards for planning, control, and performance measurement. Prerequisite: Business 230 with a grade of C- or better. (Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)

CHEM 105: The Chemistry of Art

This course will explore fundamental principles of chemistry and the scientific method through the lens of art. The course will introduce concepts necessary for an understanding of the electromagnetic spectrum; the chemical and physical principles that help to explain color; the chemical composition and interactions of atoms and molecules as they apply to pigments, dyes, binders, glazes, paper, fabrics, and metals; as well as the chemical changes active in processes like fresco painting, etching and photography. Building on a fundamental understanding of chemical and physical principles at work in the materials used to create art, the course will culminate with an exploration of case studies in the use of technology for art conservation and/or the detection of forgeries. The course format will include lecture, some short laboratory exercises, and a field trip. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Natural Sciences requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Natural Science & Mathematics requirement.)

CHIN 109: Chinese in the Business World

The course is designed for students and working professionals who have no prior knowledge of Chinese, and are interested in conducting business in China. The objective of this course is to build a solid foundation of basic Chinese in the business context, with a focus on speaking and listening. Topics in the course cover basic daily corporate interactions and business-related social exchanges such as meeting people, introducing companies, making inquiries and appointments, visiting companies, introducing products, initiating dining invitations, etc. This course will also help you gain a better understanding of Chinese business culture, and assist you in overcoming the problems in cross-cultural communication from a comparative perspective. No prerequisite. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Humanities and Global Perspectives requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities and Cultural Diversity requirements.)Cross-listed as: ASIA 109.

CINE 185: Film and Religion

Viewing films as meaningful texts, this course examines the perspectives offered by Asian and American filmmakers on such religious questions as: What does it mean to be human? How does death inform the living of life? How do values shape relationships? What is community and how is it created? What is ethical behavior? The range of films explored here function as vehicles for entering religious worldviews, communicating societal values, and probing different responses to the question of how to live a meaningful life. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Humanities and Global Perspectives requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities and Cultural Diversity requirements.) Cross-listed as: ASIA 185, CINE 185.

CINE 236: Latin American Film in English

Taught in English. An interdisciplinary study of Latin American film, from multiple perspectives: artistic, historical, political, and socio-economic. This course will highlight the artistic achievements of Latin American filmmakers from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico. We will use selected readings from original works for films that are based on fiction. A number of films have been Academy Award nominees or winners. Further readings will include a history of Latin American cinema, movie reviews, and interviews with directors. The course will scrutinize the links among cultural phenomena, socio-political events, and the art of filmmaking. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Humanities and Global Perspectives requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities and Cultural Diversity requirements.) Cross-listed as: SPAN 236, LNAM 236, LCTR 236.

CINE 382: Reel Journalism: Hollywood & News

(Reel Journalism: Hollywood and the Newsroom.) The news media has been a popular subject for Hollywood since the inception of filmmaking. Whether it?s the story pursued by journalists or reporters? own narratives, movies such as Citizen Kane, All The President?s Men, Good Night & Good Luck, and, most recently, Spotlight won awards, entertained millions, and grossed millions more at the box office. In this course, we observe how ethical standards are portrayed on the big screen and explore filmmaking techniques and metaphors. Students also will gain perspectives of important U.S. history that continue to be relevant in current events. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Humanities requirement.)

COLL 100: Personal Finance /Prof. Growth

(Personal Finance and Professional Growth.) Through class exercises and field research activities, students learn to manage their personal finances while developing pre-professional competencies (e.g. attitudes, dispositions, personal orientations/ethics, social skills). Personal financial planning topics include wise actions for managing budgets, taxes, consumer credit, housing decisions, insurance, investments, and the best ways to consider how you are financing education costs. Goal setting, creative problem-solving, team building, and working with a mentor will help students manage monetary stress and develop a plan for meeting their financial goals. Identifying and learning to communicate about personal qualities for career exploration are emphasized. Learning activities involve interactive experiences, case studies, and personal assessments to create a personal financial plan and professional development portfolio. No prerequisites.

ECON 110: Principles of Economics

An introduction to both microeconomics, the theory of consumer and producer behavior, and macroeconomics, the determination of aggregate levels of production, employment, inflation, and growth. Application of economic principles to the analysis of current problems of the U.S. economy. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.) Cross-listed as: IREL 110.

ECON 129: MS Excel for E/B/F Students

(Beginning and Intermediate Microsoft Excel Workshop for Economics, Business, & Finance Students). This experiential course allows students to learn basic and intermediate Microsoft Excel skills. These skills will be applied in future economics, business, and finance courses and in the workplace using spreadsheet software. By the end of this course, students will be able to perform spreadsheet calculations, and create professional graphs and charts from data. Skills included in this workshop are: working with formulas and functions (including regression analysis and best-fit lines), formatting a worksheet, working with charts, analyzing data using formulas, managing workbook data, using tables (including pivot tables & charts), analyzing table data, automating worksheet tasks, enhancing charts, macros & VBA, and using the “What If” analysis. Most training is conducted on an online platform with students using Excel in a simulated environment. Projects for each module are worked in Excel. Through the online platform, students follow along using the same source material that the textbook author uses throughout the lessons. This course meets for one 90-minute instructor-led session during the summer or two sessions during the fall and spring semesters in a PC computer lab. Students work independently around these meetings. The instructor hosts several office hours to provide support for students as needed. This 0.50-credit course is graded P/F and has no prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Technology requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)

ECON 313: Money & Banking

Analysis of bank and nonbank financial institutions. Topics include the S&L crisis, the impact of the 1980 and 1982 deregulation acts, the changing role of the Federal Reserve and the ability to conduct effective monetary policy, and bank asset and liability management. Prerequisite: ECON 220. (Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)

EDUC 264: Africa in Films: Language, Education, and Development

New course. Description coming soon!

EDUC 501: Introduction to Teacher Research

This course provides the MAT candidate with an introduction to educational research. Topics include the context of teacher research, an introduction to multiple varieties of teacher research, with an emphasis on action research, as well as grounding in quantitative and qualitative research methods. A case study of action research will be completed. Prerequisite: Second year MAT licensure candidate status.

ENGL 135: Creative Writing

A beginning course in the art of writing fiction, poetry, and nonfiction prose. Literary analysis will be combined with creative assignments. Group discussions and individual conferences. (Not open to students who have completed English 235.) (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Creative & Performing Arts and Writing requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities requirement.)

ENGL199: Stories of Resiliency

Imaginative literature from many cultures documents challenges to the individual’s personal resiliency. Whether these challenges come from antagonists, from the social norms of the community, or from nature itself, writers of poetry, drama, and fiction have studied the ways people have met, or failed to meet, challenges to their lives, wellbeing, and sanity. Focusing chiefly on American literature from the nineteenth and twentieth century, this course will engage students in discussion of resiliency struggles as they have been framed by the imaginations of great writers. This online course will research activities, threaded interactive discussion, video mini-lectures, and group projects. (Pending approval.)

ENGL 2xx: Sickness and Health in Dystopian Literature

New course. Description coming soon!

ENGL 245: Novel Writing Boot Camp

An intensive course focusing on the craft of novel writing. Students will study the novel form and the possibilities and frameworks of different genres of fiction and hybrid prose. Students will draft their own novels and develop plans for completing their manuscripts and submitting them to publishers within the framework of the course. Group discussions and individual conferences. Prerequisites: None, though ENGL 135 is recommended. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Creative & Performing Arts and Writing requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities requirement.)

ENGL 267: BFFs: Female Friendship in Girls

(BFFs: Female Friendship in the Time of Girls.) “Besties” are found everywhere in contemporary anglophone fiction, television, and film. Usually placed behind romantic relationships, female friendship is now understood to be a powerful and even transformative dynamic, one that is central to female identity. Men and lovers take a back seat. Are BFFs taking over the usual unions of romantic or erotic love? How much are girlfriends the focus of these stories? In this course, we examine these contemporary representations of female friendship, from the four character “types” at the center of Sex and the City and Girls to the erotic and dangerous “besties” of Emma Cline’s The Girls. We will examine how these “types” relate to, and part ways from, their literary predecessors, from Jane Austen to the present. Throughout, we discover the many sides of this complex, and contradictory, relationship. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Humanities requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities and Cultural Diversity requirements.)

MATH 110: Calculus I

The calculus of functions of one variable. Limits, continuity, differentiation, and applications; a brief introduction to integration. Prerequisite: 3.5 years of high school mathematics (to include trigonometry) or Mathematics 105. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Natural Science & Mathematics requirement.)

MATH 111: Calculus II

The calculus of functions of one variable. Integration, applications of integration, sequences, and series. Prerequisite: Mathematics 110. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Natural Science & Mathematics requirement.)

MATH 115: Honors Calculus I

Theory and applications of the calculus of functions of one variable, including trigonometric and exponential functions. Limits, continuity, differentiation, integration, and applications. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Natural Science & Mathematics requirement.)

MUSC 269: The Beatles as Musicians

New course. Description coming soon!

MUSC 264: History of Rock and Roll

This course covers the history of rock music from its origins in the blues and American country music to the diverse rock styles heard today. Analysis of performances and compositional styles of several familiar rock stars is included. Social and political influences will be addressed, but the focus will be on the music itself. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Humanities and Domestic Pluralism requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities requirement.) Cross-listed as: AMER 264.

NEUR 117: Robots and Brains: fantasies and Facts

New course. Description coming soon!

PHIL 156: Logic and Styles of Arguments

Focus on the ‘rhyme and reason’ of language. Examination of the reasons arguments are constructed in the ways they are. Investigation of informal, Aristotelian, and propositional logics, with readings from magazine articles, advertisements, and classical philosophers. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities requirement.)

POLS 110: Introduction to Global Politics

This course is an introduction to the main concepts and theories of comparative politics and international relations. Students investigate the democratic and non-democratic political systems and current political issues across the developed and developing worlds; war and peace; prosperity and poverty; and the political ideologies that have shaped politics within and among nations in the modern era. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences and Global Perspectives requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.) Cross-listed as: IREL 140.

POLS 211: Politics of India

New course. Description coming soon!

POLS 240: Introduction to Comparative Politics

New course. Description coming soon!

POLS 243: Fake News, Free Speech

(Fake News, Free Speech and Foreign Influence in American Democracy.) This course focuses on contemporary issues facing public discourse in the United States and explores the dangers inherent in online content. We discuss such questions as: What are the strengths and weaknesses of using internet technology to organize people? How do social media platforms and their ad-driven algorithms bias our worldview? How are democratic elections and mass protests shaped by your unique news feeds? A constitutional perspective on freedom of speech and the press is presented. Substantive topics include analysis of online social movements, legal analysis of federal regulation of social media, federal election law, foreign interference in national politics, and a technical review of social media platforms. No prerequisites. (Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.)

PSYC 150: Foundations of Experimental Psychology 

Foundations of Experimental Psychology is designed to develop a conceptual and quantitative understanding of experimental research in psychology. In this course, students gain experience with reviewing primary research articles, identifying the fundamental components of experimental design, replicating classic experiments, completing descriptive and inferential statistical analyses using SPSS, and communicating scientific research. This course is delivered via an online platform with video tutorials, readings, practice activities, quizzes, and a final exam.  The course is self-paced and requires regular, independent work by the student.  The instructor hosts several office hours to provide support for students as needed. The course is intended to be a skills-building and preparatory course for subsequent enrollment into PSYC 221L (Research Methods & Statistics I), particularly for students who have not a laboratory-based introduction to psychological science course. Students who have taken PSYC 110L will not receive credit for this course.  This 0.25-credit course is graded P/F and has no prerequisites. There is no charge for this course for Psychology transfer students.

SOAN 110: Intro to Sociology and Anthropology

Sociology and anthropology share a focus on exploring the social (group rather than individual) bases of human practices and behaviors. Both disciplines study social interaction and such social institutions as family and religion. This course introduces students to key concepts for viewing the world through sociological and anthropological lenses, including cultural relativism, material culture, and the social construction of human experience through categories like race, class, and gender. Limited to first- and second-year students. Not open to students who have taken SOAN 100. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science requirement.) Cross-listed as: IREL 160.

SOAN 208: Sociology of Terrorism

Terrorism has been part of the Western consciousness since the rise of anarchism a century ago. Events of September 11th, 2001, brought a new urgency to the examination of the global circumstances and forces that have given rise to the present brand of transnational and global terrorism. The newest mode of this phenomenon is visible in the public propaganda of ISIL and its affiliates in West Asia and North Africa. This course concentrates on sociological perspectives regarding specific traditions that have fostered terrorist ideologies and practices. The varieties of terrorism to be examined in this course include Christian (in the United States and Europe), Islamic (Shiite or Sunni branches), Buddhist, Sikh/Hindu, and secular terrorism of the left and the right. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences and Global Perspectives requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science and Cultural Diversity requirements.) Cross-listed as: IREL 275.

SOAN 240: Deviance

How society defines deviants - its outcasts and outsiders - and how the people so defined respond to this categorization; the nature of normal and abnormal, legal and illegal. Do these categories have absolute moral meaning, or do they always depend on the particular society and era in which they are defined? Topics to be addressed include stigma and stereotyping, cross-cultural variations in gender roles, the status of the inmate, deviance as blocked opportunity, and the political mobilization of outsiders. No prerequisites. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Social Sciences and Domestic Pluralism requirements. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Social Science and Cultural Diversity requirements.)

THTR 120: Acting I: Being on Stage

For beginners and experienced actors alike, this course is required for all theater majors but open to students from any discipline with any level of experience. What is acting? Is there a difference between being and acting? How do we draw from our own lives to create a performance? Is there a difference between performing and acting? This class explores these questions through performance, reading, and written analysis. Students will study scripts, acting theory, and one another’s work as they sharpen their acting techniques and critical thinking skills. (Under the Forester Fundamental Curriculum, this course meets the Creative & Performing Arts requirement. Under the old GEC, this course meets the Humanities requirement.)