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Access Summer

Class Schedule

Take a look at the classes offered during Access Summer 2018. There are three terms with a variety of classes. When you register, indicate which classes you’re interested in taking.

May Term: May 15 – June 8

Classes meet Tuesday - Friday. No classes on Monday.

If your classroom is not yet listed, please check back on this page one week prior to the start of the term. 

View Class Descriptions

ART 130

Elements of Design

9–11:50 a.m.
M. Bolinger

Durand 208 

ART 133

3-D Design Foundations

9–11:50 a.m.
D. Sanchez-Burr

Durand Art Studio

BUSN 330

Intermediate Accounting

9–11:50 a.m.
A. Gammel

Young Hall 320

CHEM 105

The Chemistry of Art

9–11:50 a.m.
D. Wiser

Lillard 344

CINE 175

Introduction to Cinema Studies

*(cancelled)

1–3:50 p.m.
J. McCracken

Durand 208

CINE 236

Latin American Film in Translation
(Taught in English)

9–11:50 a.m.
G. Meneses

Carnegie 300

 

ECON 110

Principles of Economics 

9–11:50 a.m.
K. Grote

Young 313

EDUC 501

Introduction to Teacher Research 

9–11:50 a.m.
D. Odugu

Buchanan 205

ENGL 111

Introduction to Professional Writing

9–11:50 a.m.
J. Stockdale

Carnegie 102

ENGL 206

American Environmental Literature

1–3:50 p.m.
B. Goluboff

Carnegie 102

ENTP 120

Introduction to Entrepreneurship
*(cancelled)

9–11:50 a.m.

ES 203

Spring Flora of the Great Lakes

Field days: 8:00 am - 6:00 pm on the following:  5/16, 5/17, 5/23, 5/24,
5/30-5/31 overnight trip, 
6/6, 6/7

9–11:50 a.m.
G. Adelson

Lillard 244

MATH 110

Calculus I

9–11:50 a.m.
E. Treviño

Young 423

PHIL 156

Logic & Styles of Argument

9–11:50 a.m.
C. McCracken

Young 314

POLS 110

Introduction to Global Politics

*(cancelled)

9–11:50 a.m.
J. Marquardt

Young 411

RELG 185

Film and Religion

1–3:50 p.m.
B. Zeller

Buchanan 010

SOAN 100

Introduction to Sociology/Anthropology–Health

*(cancelled)

9–11:50 a.m.
H. Swyers

Buchanan 001

SOAN 208

Sociology of Terrorism

1–3:50 p.m.
A. Sadri

Carnegie 304

SOAN 240

Deviance

9–11:50 a.m.
D. Boden

Carnegie 204

June Term: June 11–July 6

Classes meet Monday–Thursday. No classes on Friday, with the exception of Friday, July 6.

If your classroom is not yet listed, please check back on this page one week prior to the start of the term. 

View Class Descriptions

ART 238

Mixed Media for a Remixed World

9–11:50 a.m.
J. Thome

BIOL 118

Our Amazing Brain

9–11:50 a.m.
S. Debburman

BUSN 130#

Applied Statistics

(#Students must also enroll in ECON 129 at the same time, unless completed as a prerequisite. Students will earn 1.5 Lake Forest College credits or 6 semester hours for potential transfer. There is no additional charge for ECON 129.)

9–11:50 a.m.
S. H. Ghodsi

BUSN 230

Financial Accounting

9–11:50 a.m.
D. Jordan

CINE 210

Wonder Women: Gender, Geek Culture, and the Hollywood Blockbuster

9–11:50 a.m.
J. Berger

ECON 129#

Microsoft Excel (1/2 credit / 2 semester hours)

(#Students who also enroll in BUSN 130 at the same time will earn 1.5 Lake Forest College credits or 6 semester hours for potential transfer.) 

June 11 9-11:50 a.m. (all other work online)
C. Corso

EDUC 320

Comparative and International Education

9–11:50 a.m.
D. Odugu

ENGL 209

Storytelling and STEM: Writing about Science

1–3:50 p.m.
Z. Martin

ENGL 245

Novel Writing Boot Camp

1–3:50 p.m.
J. Corey

ES 110

Introduction to Environmental Studies

1–3:50 p.m.
B. Goluboff

ES 204

Summer Flora of the Great Lakes

Field days: 8:00 am - 6:00 pm in the following:  6/12, 6/13, 6/19, 6/20, 
6/26 - 6/27 overnight trip, 
7/3

9–11:50 a.m.
G. Adelson

MATH 110

Calculus I

9–11:50 a.m.
S. Hamed

PHIL 242*

Catastrophe and Risk: The Philosophy of Insurance

9–11:50 a.m.
C. McCracken

POLS 234

Fake News, Free Speech, and Foreign Influence in American Democracy

9–11:50 a.m.
J. Kee

SPAN 109

Introductory Business Spanish

9–11:50 a.m.
D. Fernández-Díaz

THTR 208

Topics Costume Design: Game of Thrones and Fantasy

9–11:50 a.m.
N. Rohrer

July Term: July 9–Aug 2

Classes meet Monday - Thursday. No classes on Friday. 

If your classroom is not yet listed, please check back on this page one week prior to the start of the term. 

View Class Descriptions

AFAM 120

Brooklyn’s Finest: JAY-Z and Philosophy

*Meets in Chicago at The Flats

9–11:50 a.m.
D. Evans

ART 235

Drawing and Landscape Painting in the Social Media Age

9–11:50 a.m.
M. Bolinger

BIOL 103

Human Biology

9–11:50 a.m.
L. Foss

BUSN 334

Financial Accounting with QuickBooks

9–11:50 a.m.
D. Jordan

CINE 382

Reel Journalism: Hollywood and the Newsroom

9–11:50 a.m.
M. Conklin

ENGL 226

Introduction to Virtual Reality: Culture and Technology

1–3:50 p.m.
B. Hutchinson

ENGL 267

BFFs: Female Friendship in the Time of Girls

9–11:50 a.m.
K. Reedy

FIN 210

Financial Management

6–8:50 p.m.
B. Hollingsworth

JOUR 245

Music Journalism in the Digital Age

1–3:50 p.m.
S. Gillen

MATH 110

Calculus I

9–11:50 a.m.
S. Hamed

MUSC 264

The History of Rock and Roll

9–11:50 a.m.
N. Wallin

PHIL 203

Business and Professional Ethics

1–3:50 p.m.
D. DeFranco

POLS 130

Great Political Ideas

9–11:50 a.m.
E. Oxman

POLS 238

Cybercrime and (White Hat) Hacking

9–11:50 a.m.
J. Kee

RELG 200

Yoga: Culture, Theory, and Practice

1–3:50 p.m.
R. Ben-Yoseph

SOAN 205

Archaeological Field School

8:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.
R. Graff

THTR 204

Theatre Boot Camp: A Production in a Month

1–3:50 p.m.
D. Knoell

Class Descriptions

Classes marked with a “*” are new, and pending approval by the Curricular Policies Committee.

May Term: May 15–June 8

ART 130: Elements of Design

Introduction to basic design problems in various two- and three-dimensional techniques and media. A prerequisite for most other courses in studio art. Course fee for supplies: $30. 

ART 133: 3-D Design Foundations

This course offers students an introduction to three-dimensional art and design materials and methods. Inspired by Bauhaus course topics, the curriculum approaches additive and subtractive processes in material and conceptual explorations of form. Students will make studio projects and study important texts in 3D design and sculpture theory in building a vocabulary to deal with spatial design issues including figuration, abstraction, structure, surface, form and function. No prerequisites. Course fee for supplies: $15. 

BUSN 330: Intermediate Accounting

Accounting concepts, principles, and theory with an emphasis on the special problems that arise in applying these concepts to external reporting. Prerequisites: Business 230 with a grade of C- or better.

CHEM 105: The Chemistry of Art

This course will explore fundamental principles of chemistry and the scientific method through the lens of art. The course will introduce concepts necessary for an understanding of the electromagnetic spectrum; the chemical and physical principles that help to explain color; the chemical composition and interactions of atoms and molecules as they apply to pigments, dyes, binders, glazes, paper, fabrics, and metals; as well as the chemical changes active in processes like fresco painting, etching and photography. Building on a fundamental understanding of chemical and physical principles at work in the materials used to create art, the course will culminate with an exploration of case studies in the use of technology for art conservation and/or the detection of forgeries. The course format will include lecture, some short laboratory exercises, and a field trip. No prerequisites.

CINE 175: Introduction to Film Studies

This course addresses basic topics in cinema studies, including: cinema technique, film production style, the basic language of film criticism, genres of cinema, movements from the history of cinema, and film criticism. Many topics are addressed through careful analysis of particularly important and representative films and directors. No prerequisites. Cross-listed as: AMER 175

CINE 236: Latin American Film

Taught in English. An interdisciplinary study of Latin American film, from multiple perspectives: artistic, historical, political, and socio-economic. This course will highlight the artistic achievements of Latin American filmmakers from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico. We will use selected readings from original works for films that are based on fiction. A number of films have been Academy Award nominees or winners. Further readings will include a history of Latin American cinema, movie reviews, and interviews with directors. The course will scrutinize the links among cultural phenomena, socio-political events, and the art of filmmaking. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)  Cross-listed as: LNAM 236, SPAN 236 

ECON 110: Principles of Economics

An introduction to both microeconomics, the theory of consumer and producer behavior, and macroeconomics, the determination of aggregate levels of production, employment, inflation, and growth. Application of economic principles to the analysis of current problems of the U.S. economy.
Cross-listed as: IREL 110

EDUC 501: Introduction to Teacher Research

This course provides the MAT candidate with an introduction to educational research. Topics include the context of teacher research, an introduction to multiple varieties of teacher research, with an emphasis on action research, as well as grounding in quantitative and qualitative research methods. A case study of action research will be completed. Prerequisite: Second year MAT licensure candidate status.

ENGL 111: Intro to Professional Writing

(Introduction to Professional Writing) This course introduces students to the kind of writing they may encounter in the work world by exploring the rhetorical principles, writing strategies, and information-mapping practices necessary for producing organized, readable documents - from traditional print business letters and reports to email correspondence and social-media text. This course will provide the tools to effectively gather and refine information, organize it in reader-friendly fashion, and adapt it for the appropriate audience and genre. Students will also hone an economical, direct prose style, which is standard for effective professional writing. No prerequisites.

ENGL 206: American Environmental Lit

An historically organized survey of the various rhetorics through which nature has been understood by Americans from the Puritans to contemporary writers: the Calvinist fallen landscape, the rational continent of the American Enlightenment, conservation and ‘wise use,’ and preservation and ‘biodiversity.’
Cross-listed as: AMER 206, ES 206

ES 203: Spring Flora of the Great Lakes

(Spring Flora of the Western Great Lakes.) This course introduces students to the identification, systematics, ecology, and natural history of the spring flora of the Western Great Lakes. This course includes extensive field work in the greater Chicago area and eastern Wisconsin. Students learn to identify between 150 and 200 species of wildflowers, grasses, trees, shrubs, and other plants, and learn the characteristics of 15 to 20 plant families. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Natural and Mathematical Sciences Requirement.) This Summer Session course in 2018 will be held in the mornings on Tuesdays and Fridays plus full field days on Wednesdays and Thursdays.
Cross-listed as: BIOL 203

MATH 110: Calculus I

The calculus of functions of one variable. Limits, continuity, differentiation, and applications; a brief introduction to integration. Prerequisite: 3.5 years of high school mathematics (to include trigonometry) or Mathematics 105.

PHIL 156: Logic and Styles of Arguments

Focus on the ‘rhyme and reason’ of language. Examination of the reasons arguments are constructed in the ways they are. Investigation of informal, Aristotelian, and propositional logics, with readings from magazine articles, advertisements, and classical philosophers.

POLS 110: Introduction to Global Politics

This course is an introduction to the main concepts and theories of comparative politics and international relations. Students investigate the democratic and non-democratic political systems and current political issues across the developed and developing worlds; war and peace; prosperity and poverty; and the political ideologies that have shaped politics within and among nations in the modern era.
Cross-listed as: IREL 140

RELG 185: Film and Religion

Viewing films as meaningful texts, this course examines the perspectives offered by Asian and American filmmakers on such religious questions as: What does it mean to be human? How does death inform the living of life? How do values shape relationships? What is community and how is it created? What is ethical behavior? The range of films explored here function as vehicles for entering religious worldviews, communicating societal values, and probing different responses to the question of how to live a meaningful life. No prerequisites. Intended for first-year students and sophomores. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
Cross-listed as: ASIA 185, CINE 185

SOAN 110: Intro to Sociology and Anthropology

An inquiry into the social (group rather than individual) bases of human practices and human life: an unfamiliar but revealing perspective on the familiar world. Limited to first- and second-year students.
Cross-listed as: IREL 160

SOAN 208: Sociology of Terrorism

Terrorism has been part of the Western consciousness since the rise of anarchism a century ago. Events of September 11th, 2001, brought a new urgency to the examination of the global circumstances and forces that have given rise to the present brand of transnational and global terrorism. The newest mode of this phenomenon is visible in the public propaganda of ISIL and its affiliates in West Asia and North Africa. This course concentrates on sociological perspectives regarding specific traditions that have fostered terrorist ideologies and practices. The varieties of terrorism to be examined in this course include Christian (in the United States and Europe), Islamic (Shiite or Sunni branches), Buddhist, Sikh/Hindu, and secular terrorism of the left and the right. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
Cross-listed as: IREL 275

SOAN 240: Deviance

How society defines deviants - its outcasts and outsiders - and how the people so defined respond to this categorization; the nature of normal and abnormal, legal and illegal. Do these categories have absolute moral meaning, or do they always depend on the particular society and era in which they are defined? Topics to be addressed include stigma and stereotyping, cross-cultural variations in gender roles, the status of the inmate, deviance as blocked opportunity, and the political mobilization of outsiders. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)

June Term: June 11–July 6 

ART 238: Mixed Media for a Remixed World

This course asks students to cross boundaries—to create with different techniques, materials, and methods—through sustained exploration of how art can respond to and interact with the current mashup and remix moment. Students will use drawing media, paint, collage, and transfer processes—combining them with non-traditional ways of making, such as 3D printing, sculptural books, digital photography, and collage. The emphasis will be on experimentation to not only familiarize students with relevant techniques but also to produce unexpected outcomes toward the production of innovative works of art that will kick start student practice for the future. 

BIOL 118: Our Amazing Brain

This course will introduce students to the science behind how a human brain functions and produces behaviors. This amazing organ is composed of billions of neurons that form trillions of connections with each other. These neurons allow us to sense and perceive the world around us, integrate new experiences with old ones, form thoughts and actions, and develop consciousness and personality. In this course, students will discover how brain dysfunction is the root cause of many illnesses, including addiction, schizophrenia, depression, cancer, stroke, and Alzheimer’s disease. Students will also have the opportunity to work with preserved brains. No prior experience with science is required to succeed in this course. No prerequisites.

Cross-listed as: NEUR 118, PSYC 118
BUSN 130: Applied Statistics#

Distribution analysis, sampling theory, statistical inference, and regression analysis, with emphasis on the application of statistical techniques using spreadsheet software to analyze economic and business issues. Students who have taken this course will not receive credit for MATH 150. Prerequisite or corequisite: ECON 129.
Cross-listed as: ECON 130, FIN 130

BUSN 230: Financial Accounting

Methods, practices, and concepts underlying the communication of relevant financial information to external parties. Development of the accounting model, measurement processes, data terminology and classification, internal control, interpretation and uses of financial statements. Prerequisites: ECON 110 and either MATH 110 or MATH 160, both with grades of C- or better.

CINE 210: Wonder Women: Gender, Geek Culture, and the Hollywood Blockbuster

Women are engaged with all kinds of fandoms, attending conventions, gaming, cosplaying, and seeking representation on the screen like never before. Responses from the male-dominated community have been varied, and in cases like Gamergate and the response to the 2016 Ghostbusters reboot, unwelcoming and threatening. In this course, we will consider the history and formation of a cinematic Geek Culture and the evolving role women have played as subjects, consumers, and producers of all things geeky. We will pay particular attention to films from the past thirty years. Course viewing may include: Wonder Woman, Mad Max: Fury Road, the Alien franchise, The Hunger Games, Ghost in the Shell, and others.

ECON 129: MS Excel for Economics/Business/Finance Students#

(Beginning and Intermediate Microsoft Excel Workshop for Economics, Business, & Finance Students). This hands-on workshop for the E/B/F Department allows students to learn basic and intermediate Microsoft Excel skills. These skills will be applied in future E/B/F courses and in the workplace using spreadsheet software. By the end of this course, students will be able to perform spreadsheet calculations, and create professional graphs and charts from data. Skills included in this workshop are: working with formulas and functions (including Regression Analysis and best-fit lines), formatting a worksheet, working with charts, analyzing data using formulas, managing workbook data, using tables (including Pivot Tables & Charts), Analyzing table data, automating worksheet tasks, enhancing charts, Macros & VBA, and using the What If analysis. Working files are included to allow students to follow along using the same source material that the author uses throughout the lessons. This course meets for seven 90-minute instructor-led sessions in a PC computer lab and seven online meetings. This 0.50-credit course is graded Credit/D/F and has no prerequisites.

Students should have access to their own computers.

EDUC 320: Comparative and International Educ

(Comparative and International Education: Education as the Practice of Freedom) This course examines both the study and practice of comparative and international education. The course is organized with a multidisciplinary perspective with analysis of history, theory, methods, and issues in comparative and international education. A major goal of the course is to interrogate the linkages between education and society. Recurrent themes will be examined to demonstrate how every educational system not only arises from but also shapes its particular socio-cultural context. Students will have the opportunity to deepen and expand their knowledge of educational issues within a global context. Not open to first-year students. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.
Cross-listed as: ETHC 330, SOAN 344, IREL 388

ENGL 209: Storytelling and STEM: Writing About Science

A writing-intensive course focused on using the tools of narrative nonfiction to communicate scientific discovery to the public. Students will read the work of scientists and scientific communicators such as Stephen Hawking, Rebecca Skloot, Neil Degrasse Tyson, Atul Gawande, and Steven Pinker to discover the storytelling principles they employ to inform and entertain their readers. We will explore the science of story — the cognitive and evolutionary source of its power — and the art of scientific journalism, and students will draft and workshop their own essays about “popular science.” 

ENGL 245: Novel Writing Boot Camp

An intensive course focusing on the craft of novel writing. Students will study the novel form and the possibilities and frameworks of different genres of fiction and hybrid prose. Students will draft their own novels and develop plans for completing their manuscripts and submitting them to publishers within the framework of the course. Group discussions and individual conferences. Prerequisites: None, though ENGL 135 is recommended.

ES 110: Intro to Environmental Studies

The environment is not only a natural place filled with trees and pandas, but a matrix in which all human economies and societies are embedded. Solving current environmental problems often involves closing feedback loops between political, social, and economic processes and the ecosystems from which they draw, and which they, in turn, impact. For this reason, the scholarly study of environmental issues is inherently interdisciplinary, requiring a sophisticated appreciation not only of science, but also of the humanities and social sciences. This course is an introduction to the multifaceted and interdisciplinary nature of environmental problems and their solutions in today’s world. It emphasizes field trips and scientific content, particularly related to understanding biodiversity and ecosystems. It also offers perspectives on environmental issues from the humanities and/or social sciences. Specific topics and content may vary with the professor(s). No prerequisites. Intended for students interested in pursuing the Environmental Studies major.

ES 204: Summer Flora of the Great Lakes

(Summer Flora of the Western Great Lakes). This course introduces students to the identification, systematics, ecology, and natural history of the summer flora of the Western Great Lakes. This course includes extensive field work in the greater Chicago area, eastern Wisconsin, and Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. Students learn to identify between 150 and 200 species of wildflowers, grasses, trees, shrubs, and other plants, and learn the characteristics of 15 to 20 plant families. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Natural and Mathematical Sciences Requirement.) This Summer Session course in 2018 will be held in the mornings on Mondays and Thursdays plus full field days on Tuesdays and Wednesdays.
Cross-listed as: BIOL 204

MATH 110: Calculus I

The calculus of functions of one variable. Limits, continuity, differentiation, and applications; a brief introduction to integration. Prerequisite: 3.5 years of high school mathematics (to include trigonometry) or Mathematics 105.

PHIL 242: Catastrophe and Risk: The Philosophy of Insurance*

This course examines the institution of insurance philosophically. Beginning with a consideration of the problem of induction, and ranging over philosophical discourses about miracles, apocalypse, and the nature of prediction, the course ponders the ways in which the concept of rationality is shaped, both by our knowledge and by our ignorance. The course explores the concepts of risk and luck, considering the extent to which political and social institutions can and should be used as risk-pooling devices to soften the effects of catastrophe and to buffer the effects of luck. We also pay some attention to insurance law, to the relationship between entrepreneurial projections and actuarial calculations, and to representations of insurance in literature and film.

POLS 234: Fake News, Free Speech and Foreign Influence in American Democracy

What are the strengths and weaknesses of using internet technology to organize people? How do social media platforms and their ad-driven algorithms bias our worldview? How are democratic elections and mass protests shaped by your unique news feeds? This course focuses on contemporary issues facing public discourse in the United States. A constitutional perspective on freedom of speech and the press will be presented. The course will explore the dangers inherent in online content. Substantive topics include analysis of online social movements, legal analysis of federal regulation of social media, federal election law, foreign interference in national politics, and a technical review of social media platforms.

SPAN 109: Introductory Business Spanish

This introductory course has been designed for students with no prior knowledge of Spanish but with interest in the Hispanic business world. This course focuses on initiating and responding to a variety of real-world business situations, such as meeting people, introducing companies, products, or making inquiries. Along with acquiring a solid foundation of basic Spanish used in the business world, students are exposed to the culture of selected Spanish-speaking countries. The course supports rapid progress in Spanish and aims to prepare students for intermediate-level language study.

THTR 208: Topics Costume Design: Game of Thrones and Fantasy

Learn the basics of designing costumes for stage and screen, with an emphasis on the style of Game of Thrones and other fantasies! You will develop skills in theatrical rendering and sketching, as well as the implementation of the design and basic sewing techniques. You will also learn the elements and principles of design; understand and experience the process of producing costumes for the theater, television, and film; analyze the text and structure of a play or screenplay, explore the production needs related to costumes, and prepare a finalized costume design for a theatrical, television, or film production.

July Term: July 9–August 2

AFAM 120: Brooklyn’s Finest: JAY-Z and Philosophy

From growing up in the Marcy Projects in Brooklyn to selling out concerts at Madison Square Garden, JAY-Z has become a global hip-hop icon. Besides being the first rap artist to be inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame and holding the record for the most number one albums by a solo artist, JAY-Z’s body of work stands as a monumental contribution to American culture. In this course, we explore the poetics and philosophy of JAY-Z’s music. As we cultivate an artistic appreciation for JAY-Z’s rap skills such as storytelling, wordplay, and delivery, we also treat his music as an opportunity to critically engage topics such as racism, sexism, and economic inequality. Finally, we watch several of JAY-Z’s music videos as well as documentaries focused on his life and work.  Cross-listed as Phil 120.

ART 235: Drawing and Landscape Painting in the Social Media Age

This course is a primarily outdoor experience that explores the nature of “landscape” in a heavily mediated era. What is the place of drawing and landscape painting in an age where landscapes are routinely shared via smartphones, and when panorama photography, 360-degree videos, and virtual reality imaging are becoming as commonplace as cameras? This course will involve the student in the careful observation of nature, transcribed through perceptual data, and resulting in painting and drawing. Course fee for supplies: $25.

BIOL 103: Human Biology

This course examines the structure and function of many of the major organ systems of the human body. In so doing, it will introduce students to a range of important topics related to human beings. These will include the nature of science as a discipline, and the biological basis of health, disease, nutrition, exercise, sensation, and reproduction.

BUSN 334: Financial Accounting with QuickBooks*

Students in the course develop an understanding of how to use general ledger software utilizing QuickBooks. This includes company setup, setup and use of chart of accounts, recording and recognizing transactions, managing lists, generating customized reports, and preparing financial statements. Required for the course is the purchase of the appropriate text (which includes the QuickBooks software). Quickbooks requires a windows-based operation system, which we will provide in a college computer lab. Prerequisites: Busn230 with a C- or better.

CINE 382: Reel Journalism: Hollywood & News

(Reel Journalism: Hollywood and the Newsroom.) The news media has been a popular subject for Hollywood since the inception of filmmaking. Whether it’s the story pursued by journalists or reporters’ own narratives, movies such as Citizen Kane, All The President’s Men, Good Night & Good Luck, and, most recently, Spotlight won awards, entertained millions, and grossed millions more at the box office. In this course, we observe how ethical standards are portrayed on the big screen and explore filmmaking techniques and metaphors. Students also will gain perspectives of important U.S. history that continue to be relevant in current events. No prerequisites.

ENGL 226: Introduction to Virtual Reality: Culture and Technology

In recent years, virtual reality technology has made major advances, making it possible to do things and go places that were previously impossible. In this course, we’ll explore—through readings, discussion, and experiential learning in the Lake Forest College Virtual Space—some of VR experiences in areas including gaming, science, art, research, education, storytelling, and socializing. We’ll look at the way culture has thought about VR in the last few decades in novels by authors such as William Gibson, Neal Stephenson, and Ernest Cline, and in film and television programs like Strange DayseXistenZ, and Black Mirror. This class will give us a chance to think together about how space works differently in VR, how “real” VR experiences are and what the future of VR might hold.

ENGL 267: BFFs: Female Friendship in the Time of Girls

“Besties” are found everywhere in contemporary fiction, television, and film. Usually placed behind romantic relationships, female friendship is now understood to be a powerful and even transformative dynamic, one that is central to female identity. Men and lovers take a back seat: Carrie Bradshaw describes her girlfriends as her “soul mates” in “Sex and the City.” A “Coldplay song plays in my heart” whenever Hannah Horvath sees her two closest friends in “Girls.” Are BFFs taking over the usual unions of romantic or erotic love? How much are girlfriends the focus of these stories? In this course, we examine these contemporary representations of female friendship, from the four character “types” at the center of “Sex and the City” and “Girls” to the erotic and dangerous “besties” of Emma Cline’s The Girls. Throughout, we discover the many sides of this complex, and contradictory, relationship.

FIN 210: Financial Management

This course provides an overview of the questions and problems faced by financial managers, as well as an introduction to the basic set of tools they use to help them make optimal investment and financing decisions under conditions of risk and uncertainty. The main topics include time value of money, the valuation of bond and stocks, the trade-off between risk and return, the efficient markets hypothesis, the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM), cost of capital, and a brief introduction to derivative securities and international finance issues. Prerequisites: ECON 110 and ECON/BUSN/FIN 130 with grades of C- or better.

JOUR 245: Music Journalism in the Digital Age

If you plan on spending time this summer at music festivals and concerts or updating your favorite playlists, this course will teach you how to transform your passion for music into quality journalism. In this class, you will learn how to write album reviews and how to compose feature stories and essays about music. You will also learn how to interview recording artists, how to maintain an appealing blog about music, and how to research and pitch ideas for articles to editors. The class will also read journalism by acclaimed music writers and meet up with a couple working critics during class. This is a course for absolute beginners or anyone with some experience writing reviews or news articles. Cross-listed as English 247.  

MATH 110: Calculus I

The calculus of functions of one variable. Limits, continuity, differentiation, and applications; a brief introduction to integration. Prerequisite: 3.5 years of high school mathematics (to include trigonometry) or Mathematics 105.

MUSC 264: History of Rock and Roll

This course covers the history of rock music from its origins in the blues and American country music to the diverse rock styles heard today. Analysis of performances and compositional styles of several familiar rock stars is included. Social and political influences will be addressed, but the focus will be on the music itself. No prerequisites.
Cross-listed as: AMER 264

PHIL 203: Business & Professional Ethics

Analysis and evaluation of ethical problems in business and the professions. Attention will be given to the moral foundations for and limits on business activities, the idea of professional responsibility, and the relationship between professional and business obligations and general moral obligations. 

POLS 130: Great Political Ideas

What is a person’s place within a larger community? How ought we to organize our societies to create peace and/or justice? These are the fundamental questions political theorists ask. This course is an introduction to basic concepts of political thought, as well as a review of some major thinkers in political theory, both ancient and modern. Emphasis is on learning to read theoretical texts and interpreting them. Course readings are likely to include works by Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Tocqueville, Marx, Mill, and others.

POLS 238: Cybercrime and (White Hat) Hacking

This course is an introduction to computer security and related issues such as privacy, democracy, and cybercrime. We will cover the fundamental concepts of computer and network security using real-world examples. Subjects include the history of information technology from a legal perspective, current U.S. law concerning the internet, computer crime, and privacy and security protections. Attention will be given to the major events in the history of computer hacking from the 1960s to today. Students will engage in discussions on diverse topics such as the ethics and legality of computer hacking, the costs of data breaches and cybersecurity techniques. These concepts will be illustrated with readings such as narratives, current laws, and court cases, technical articles, and sample computer code.  No prerequisites.

PHIL 203: Business & Professional Ethics

Analysis and evaluation of ethical problems in business and the professions. Attention will be given to the moral foundations for and limits on business activities, the idea of professional responsibility, and the relationship between professional and business obligations and general moral obligations. (Not recommended for first-year students.)

POLS 130: Great Political Ideas

What is a person’s place within a larger community? How ought we to organize our societies to create peace and/or justice? These are the fundamental questions political theorists ask. This course is an introduction to basic concepts of political thought, as well as a review of some major thinkers in political theory, both ancient and modern. Emphasis is on learning to read theoretical texts and interpreting them. Course readings are likely to include works by Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Tocqueville, Marx, Mill, and others.

RELG 200: Topics: Yoga: Culture, Theory, and Practice

What is the history of yoga, from ancient Eastern religious origins to contemporary Western body culture? Taking a multidisciplinary approach towards the cultural, philosophical, and physical practices that we call yoga, we will analyze a range of media from written texts and documentary films to Instagram and reality television. We will spend three days each week in a seminar setting and once a week we will roll out our mats for a firsthand exploration of postures, meditation, and mindfulness.  Topics will include colonialism, orientalism, and cultural appropriation in yoga’s history, a comparative analysis of the Eastern yogic subject and the Western modern subject, and their distinctive concepts of body, mind, and spirit. We will ask what a “yoga body” looks like, from Lululemon and yoga as a competitive sport to the body positivity and disability rights movements. We will also consider the emergent scientific discourse around yoga, meditation, and mindfulness. 

SOAN 205: Archaeological Field School

Archaeological Field School introduces students to the discipline of archaeology, with an emphasis on fieldwork and excavation. Students will serve as the field crew on an archaeological dig in Chicago, with lectures, readings, workshops, and field trips providing the theoretical and historical context for the archaeological methods. Students will learn excavation, recording, laboratory and analytical techniques via some traditional coursework, but most significantly, through participation. Students will have the opportunity to experiment with these techniques, discuss the implications of their findings, and compare them with the research and ideas of professional archaeologists. No prerequisites.
Cross-listed as: AMER 208

THTR 204: Theatre Boot Camp: A Production in a Month

Theater Boot Camp is a production-in-a-month experience designed to supercharge your theater skills. This practice-driven class immerses the student in the creative process of collaborative theater toward the production of an original work. The creative process focuses on composition, presentation, feedback, and re-writes, as we take students through the entire creative cycle of development and production. Students sharpen their playwriting, acting, directing, and technical production skills, and emerge from the experience with the career know-how necessary to make their own successful theater production.