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Economics, Business, and Finance

Course Descriptions

Other courses:

Economics    Business

Finance Courses

  • FIN 130: Applied Statistics
    Distribution analysis, sampling theory, statistical inference, and regression analysis, with emphasis on the application of statistical techniques using spreadsheet software to analyze economic and business issues. Students who have taken this course will not receive credit for MATH 150. Prerequisite or corequisite: ECON 129.(This course meets the Quantitative Reasoning GEC requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: ECON 130, BUSN 130
  • FIN 140: Introduction to Insurance
    The insurance industry, operating from the fundamental principle of managing risk, interacts with a wide variety of disciplines and practices, from actuarial work to sales to modern advertising and sports marketing. Accordingly, this course provides a broad overview of the field, covering topics such as the definition of insurance, marketing, premiums, underwriting, instrument design and actuarial science, investing, claims processing, and the difference between personal and commercial insurance. Further, the course focuses on how the insurance industry drives global innovation, how it integrates with financial planning, how it uses technology to keep up with the pace of innovation, and how its driving principle, protection against future risk, plays a major role in daily life. No prerequisites.
  • FIN 210: Financial Management
    This course provides an overview of the questions and problems faced by financial managers, as well as an introduction to the basic set of tools they use to help them make optimal investment and financing decisions under conditions of risk and uncertainty. The main topics include time value of money, the valuation of bond and stocks, the trade-off between risk and return, the efficient markets hypothesis, the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM), cost of capital, and a brief introduction to derivative securities and international finance issues. Prerequisites: ECON 110 and ECON/BUSN/FIN 130 with grades of C- or better.
  • FIN 310: Corporate Finance
    This course studies the theory, methods, and issues of corporate finance. The emphasis throughout is on the economic principles that underlie business financial decisions and their impact on wealth maximization. The content includes capital budgeting, optimal capital structure, payout policies, financial planning, working capital, and corporate restructuring issues related to ownership and control. Prerequisites: FIN 210 and BUSN 230, both with a grade of C- or better.
  • FIN 320: Investments
    This course provides an examination of financial securities and financial markets from the perspective of individual investors. The main topics include securities markets, security analysis, portfolio theory, mutual funds, derivative securities, market efficiency, behavioral finance, and industry regulations. Prerequisites: ECON 210, BUSN 230 and FIN 210 with grades of C- or better.
  • FIN 337: Real Estate Finance
    An examination of the fundamental concepts, principles, and analytical methods involved in debt financing of residential and commercial real estate. Through lectures, readings, problem sets, casework, presentations and exams, students will develop and demonstrate their understanding of the process of underwriting and financing residential and commercial properties. Mortgage financing for the purpose of homeownership will lead to a focus on income-producing properties for the purpose of investment. Both the perspectives of the borrower as well as of the lender will be considered. Present value calculations and capitalization rates will be emphasized. The role of real estate capital markets will be introduced. Prerequisite: FIN 210 or FIN 237.
  • FIN 340: Risk Management and Insurance
    Risk management is the identification, assessment, and prioritization of risks followed by a coordinated response to minimize, monitor, and control the probability and/or impact of adverse events. Strategies used to manage risks typically include transferring the risk to another party and reducing the probability of the risk. This course provides students with an in-depth analysis of insurance and risk management, focusing primarily on business risks but personal risk management issues are also covered. In addition to discussing risk management in general, topics include an overview of the private insurance market, how insurance is used in risk management, alternative methods for transfer risk, insurance asset management, and insurance company regulations and ratings. Prerequisite: FIN 140.
  • FIN 365: Fundamental Equity Analysis
    Fundamental equity analysis is a stock investment technique based on the economic concept that markets are not implicitly efficient, but instead trend towards efficiency in part using fundamental analysis as a tool to outperform markets by arbitraging inefficiencies in the market. The goal of fundamental equity analysis is to seek out discrepancies in consensus views on equity securities that impact valuation using a combination of financial statement analysis and forecasting, industry/sector analysis and forecasting in tandem with disciplined approaches to valuation based on various objective quantitative criteria. Upon completing this course, students will have a rudimentary working understanding of the methodology fundamental analysts use to pick sectors and stocks. The course is heavily writing-intensive, with weekly case studies. Prerequisites: FIN 210, BUSN 230, and FIN 320.
  • FIN 370: Entrepreneurial Finance
    Entrepreneurialism thrives in the U.S. and is essential to the country's economy with well over half a million new business ventures being launched each year. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, small businesses employ half of all private sector employees and have generated the majority of new jobs in recent years. It is likely that many of today's business college graduates will work at, finance, and possibly start-up new business enterprises. The objectives of the course include: (i) gaining an understanding of the new business venture process, (ii) examining the financial aspects of strategic and business planning, (iii) developing the tools for financial forecasting, and (iv) establishing a framework for business valuation - both from the entrepreneur's and investor's perspective. Prerequisites: FIN 210 or FIN 237, and BUSN 230.
  • FIN 385: Options and Futures
    This course introduces the economic functions of options and futures markets, discusses the basic underlying pricing mechanism of options and futures contracts, and provides a working knowledge of these contracts as risk management tools. Prerequisites: FIN 210 and FIN 320
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  • FIN 415: Corp Fin, Public Policy, & Society
    (Corporate Finance, Public Policy, and Society) Theoretical and empirical issues in corporate finance are examined from the perspectives of the firm, the shareholders, and public policymakers. Topics covered include leveraged buyouts and mergers, corporate governance and managerial compensation, models of optimal capital structure and the impact of the tax system on corporate activity. Prerequisites: MATH 110, FIN 210, and FIN 310.
  • FIN 420: Fixed Income Markets and Management
    This course will provide a thorough understanding of fixed income securities. These debt instruments are a critical source of capital for governments, corporations and individuals. The fixed income markets are about twice as large as the global equity markets. This course will study the major fixed income security asset classes including treasuries, agencies, mortgage-backed, asset-backed, commercial mortgage, corporates, municipals, and private placements. The course will then focus on managing these securities in a real-world setting using leading techniques including insurance asset management. The course will include guest lecturers who are professional fixed-income portfolio managers. Prerequisite: FIN 320.
  • FIN 431: International Finance
    Identifies and analyzes fundamentals of international financial theory. Topics include exchange rate determination, balance of payments accounting, and international monetary systems and their evolution. Prerequisites: Economics 210 and 220; and junior or senior standing.
    Cross-listed as: ECON 431
  • FIN 450: Applied Value Investing
    (Applied Value Investing: Special Situations) This course offers a practical introduction to value investing, with a focus on "special situation" investing. The course improves students' ability to identify the types of securities and areas of the market that are most likely to be mispriced. In other words, students sharpen their skills as good "fishermen" (general value investing skills) but in addition, they become more astute at identifying the best "fishing holes." Examples of special situations include companies that are undergoing unusual change, such as bankruptcy, financial distress, spin-off, merger, litigation, dividend-cut, etc. The class focuses on researching and monitoring, in real-time, companies whose securities meet these criteria. Additional topics include risk assessment, where to find information, and how to determine what is materially important in an age of information overload. Prerequisites: FIN 210, and either FIN 310 or FIN 320 (B or better in all these courses taken).
  • FIN 465: Applied Investment Management
    This is an advanced course that will allow students to participate in live portfolio management while developing and implementing industry-standard investment research techniques. The class will focus on building and managing a $100 million, multi-asset class investment portfolio in a realistic asset management firm environment. The students, referred to as analysts, will engage in fundamental securities analysis and valuation in both individual and team settings. Students will present the results of their research, make investment recommendations, and evaluate the recommendations of others. The class will also involve trips to asset management firms in Chicago where students can interact with investment professionals. Prerequisites: FIN 310, FIN 320.
  • FIN 483: Behavioral Economics and Finance
    This course surveys research incorporating evidence from psychology into economic and financial decision-making theory. The aim of the course is to understand economic and financial models that more realistically explain and predict observed outcomes. The course explores prospect theory, biases in probabilistic judgment, projections biases, default effects, self-control problems, mental accounting, fairness and altruism. Students will use these tools to understand public goods contributions, financial market anomalies, consumption and savings behavior and myriad market outcomes. Prerequisites: ECON/BUSN/FIN 130 (or ECON/BUSN 180) and ECON 210.
    Cross-listed as: ECON 483
  • FIN 484: Financial Crises
    (Financial Crises: Origins, Forecasts, Modelling.) The aim of the course is to understand the creation of financial crises from a behavioral perspective by tying together the history of financial crises with time series properties, experimental finance and asset pricing financial models. Students will be able to understand the endogeneity of financial crises by studying the most severe global financial crashes and explore the contribution of human behavior in generating/exacerbating business cycles. At the same time students will apply time series properties for forecasting market movements and identifying the correlation between asset prices with themselves. Students will also study asset pricing models from an equilibrium perspective, to understand how systematic departures from rationality affect financial markets. Topics covered will also include how certain phases of financial crises can be tested by laboratory experiments with students being introduced to the basics of experimental finance. Prerequisites: MATH 110, FIN 320.(This course meets the Speaking and Senior Studies GEC requirements.)
  • FIN 485: Quantitative Finance
    The main focus of this course is on the empirical and quantitative tools necessary for investment decisions. Topics will include time series econometrics, return predictability, asset pricing models with emphasis on factor models, market efficiency and active investment, hedge funds, trading and exchange microstructure, role of quantitative finance in the financial recession, and an introduction to behavioral finance. The main emphasis is on common stocks, but other asset classes may be covered. The class will involve the use of spreadsheets software such as Excel and/or limited application of programming language such as Python. Prerequisites: ECON 129, FIN 210 and FIN 320.(This course meets the Technology GEC requirement.)
  • FIN 490: Internship
    Provides an opportunity to supplement academic training with work experience in the field of business and economics. Interested students must work with Career Services to develop a resume and register with the instructor by the following deadlines: by April 1 for a Fall internship; by November 1 for a Spring internship; and by the week following spring break for a Summer internship. Business and Economics internships may be done for either one or two credits. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, Economics 110 with a grade of C- or better as well as other designated courses relevant to the internship and earning a C or better in combination of these courses and Economics 110. Internships need to be for different experiences therefore continuation of previous internships, part-time or summer jobs is not allowed. The department will not give credit for internships that do not build directly on prior course work. Students on academic probation are ineligible for this program. Contact the Internship Supervisor for Economics and Business regarding additional information and guidelines.
    Cross-listed as: ECON 490, BUSN 490

 

Business Courses

  • BUSN 130: Applied Statistics
    Distribution analysis, sampling theory, statistical inference, and regression analysis, with emphasis on the application of statistical techniques using spreadsheet software to analyze economic and business issues. Students who have taken this course will not receive credit for MATH 150. Prerequisite or corequisite: ECON 129.(This course meets the Quantitative Reasoning GEC requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: ECON 130, FIN 130
  • BUSN 210: Managerial Economics
    Application of economic analysis to business decisions. It covers economic tools with applications to demand analysis, pricing policies, competitive strategy, cost analysis, and decision making. Prerequisites: ECON 110, either MATH 110 or MATH 160.
  • BUSN 220: Entrepren Selling & Fundraising
    (Entrepreneurial Selling and Fundraising.) [i] How can mastering the skill of asking improve every aspect of our lives? [/i] Selling and fundraising require us to ask others to take action. To that end, students in this course study why selling isn't just a set of skills or a process, and instead consider selling in terms of leadership and as sconversation. Students learn how to "ask" and how asking is an essential tool to identify and solve problems. The course highlights the differences between fundraising for nonprofit entities and selling in corporate and entrepreneurial environments. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
    Students who have taken BUSN/ENTP 320 cannot take BUSN/ENTP 220.
    Cross-listed as: ENTP 220
  • BUSN 225: Principles of Marketing
    Analysis of how marketing concepts impact an organization through the development of the marketing mix (product, price, place and promotion). Building upon these concepts, students will develop an understanding of how marketing managers develop specific strategies in order to gain competitive advantage in a global economy (formerly BUSN 345). No prerequisites.
    Cross-listed as: ENTP 225, IREL 213
  • BUSN 230: Financial Accounting
    Methods, practices, and concepts underlying the communication of relevant financial information to external parties. Development of the accounting model, measurement processes, data terminology and classification, internal control, interpretation and uses of financial statements. Prerequisites: ECON 110 and either MATH 110 or MATH 160, both with grades of C- or better.
  • BUSN 240: Chicago Business and Industry
    (Chicago Business and Industry: Growth, Change and Globalization.) This course is about the development of Chicago industry and the effects of on-going economic change and globalization on Chicago business. Business and industry are key elements to the success and wellbeing of urban America. Chicago is a case study in historic business transformation. The class will experience, evaluate and determine how business change works and the direction it can go. We will examine market needs as well as look at how Chicago history, cross-cultural roots and urban planning contribute to the process. We will also examine current Chicago businesses and institutions that contribute to and drive re-invention in a globalized world. No prerequisites.
  • BUSN 245: Principles of Management
    This course introduces important organizational and management concepts and applications, and their relevance to individual and organizational goal attainment. The course revolves around the main functions of managers: planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. The emphasis is on real-world application through experiential learning. No prerequisites.
  • BUSN 280: The Mexican-American Border
    As the only place where the third world and first world touch, the Mexican-American border is unique. This course will focus on the border and how its unique location in the world has created a culture, language, politics, religion and economy that reflect the interdependence between these two neighboring countries. The course will begin with the history of the border from the Gadsden Purchase in 1854 to the passage of NAFTA in 2004 and then examine the impact of free trade on Mexico. The course will explore how people (immigration - both legal and illegal), resources (oil, workers), consumer products (household appliances, food, music, and art), environmental waste (toxic waste, water and air pollution) and technology (outsourcing) cross borders as globalization impacts both Mexicans and Americans. The course involves a three-week stay along the border in May. Pre-requisites: ECON 110 and SPAN 112 or its equivalent.(This course meets the Global Perspectives and Experiential Learning GEC requirements.)
    Cross-listed as: IREL 214, ECON 280, LNAM 280, SPAN 201
  • BUSN 310: International Marketing Research
    A study of methods related to quantitative and qualitative research in varied international business and global non-profit settings. The course emphasizes research in industrialized societies, global emerging markets, and developing economies. Coverage includes theoretical foundations and applications of research designs, data collection methods, and data analysis techniques. Learning experiences involve planning and implementing field research, case study analysis, and team presentations based on data collection experiences. Prerequisite: BUSN 225.(This course meets the Global Perspectives GEC requirement.)
  • BUSN 315: Operations Management
    The course covers subjects related to the management process in a production system. The following topics are covered: design of products and services, quality control systems, capacity planning, process design, work analysis and measurement, facility location, and production scheduling. The inventory control system unit will discuss the relationship between inventory systems and other functions in an organization. Prerequisite: BUSN 230.
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  • BUSN 320: Principles of Sales and Negotiation
    The course will present various theories and practices in sales and negotiation techniques, using applications from modern businesses. It will also discuss various management strategies used to develop and motivate a sales force, including departmental structures and retention incentives. Prerequisite: BUSN 225.
    Cross-listed as: ENTP 320
  • BUSN 322: Emerging Markets Analysis
    Analysis of emerging markets of East Asia and Latin America, paying particular attention to growth strategies and the impact of market reforms, financial markets development, and foreign capital flows on economic performance of these countries. The course relies on case studies from Asian countries of China, South Korea, Thailand, Singapore, and Hong Kong and Latin American economies of Brazil, Argentina, Mexico, and Chile. . Prerequisite: ECON 220.
    Cross-listed as: ASIA 322, LNAM 322, IREL 310
  • BUSN 325: Design Thinking & Digital Marketing
    [i]How can being consumer-focused and data-driven improve results?[/i] Entrepreneurs, social leaders, professionals, and individuals need digital brand-building skills and marketing acumen to sell themselves and their ideas, products, and services. This course takes a human-centered approach to teaching how end users and their buying decisions are influenced by digital media. The course teaches design thinking, digital tools, web analytics, and growth hacking frameworks through a combination of exposure to industry professionals, readings, and client projects. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
    Cross-listed as: ENTP 325
  • BUSN 330: Intermediate Accounting
    Accounting concepts, principles, and theory with an emphasis on the special problems that arise in applying these concepts to external reporting. Prerequisites: Business 230 with a grade of C- or better.
  • BUSN 331: Managerial Accounting
    Use of accounting information for evaluation of planning and control decisions. Topics include budgeting, cost-volume analysis, product costing, and standards for planning, control, and performance measurement. Prerequisite: Business 230 with a grade of C- or better.
  • BUSN 332: Auditing
    Exploration of issues related to internal and external auditing. This course examines auditing standards (Generally Accepted Auditing Standards), fraud detection, professional ethics, and recent changes to regulations (including US Securities laws). Prerequisites: ECON 129, BUSN 330.
  • BUSN 333: Cost Accounting
    Advanced topics in cost and managerial accounting. Topics include cost accumulation, cost behavior, break even analysis, capital budgeting, management control systems, cost allocation methods and performance measurement. Prerequisites: ECON 129 (Excel), BUSN 331.
  • BUSN 334: Financial Accounting w/QuickBooks
    (Financial Accounting with QuickBooks.) Students in the course develop an understanding of how to use general ledger software utilizing QuickBooks. This includes company setup, setup and use of chart of accounts, recording and recognizing transactions, managing lists, generating customized reports, and preparing financial statements. Prerequisite: BUSN 230 with a grade of C-minus or better.
  • BUSN 335: Intermediate Accounting II
    This is the second course in the professional intermediate accounting sequence. This course emphasizes the balance sheet elements, specifically the components of long term liabilities and equity, and the related elements in the income statement. Prerequisite: BUSN 330.
  • BUSN 340: Chicago Business and Industry
    This course is about the development of Chicago industry and the effects of on-going economic change and globalization on Chicago business. Business and industry are key elements to the success and wellbeing of urban America. Chicago is a case study in historic business transformation. The class will experience, evaluate and determine how business change works and the direction it can go. We will examine market needs as well as look at how Chicago history, cross-cultural roots and urban planning contribute to the process. We will also examine current Chicago businesses and institutions that contribute to and drive re-invention in a globalized world. Not open to students who have completed BUSN 240. Prerequisite: ECON 110.
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  • BUSN 341: Global Cultures & Intnl Bus-Chgo
    (Global Cultures and International Business Activities of Chicago) As influences of global activities increase locally, Chicago provides vast resources for the study of cultures, economic policies, political relations, and global business strategies. More than 130 consulates and foreign trade offices, and headquarters of many global companies, are in Chicago. This course will address the development and implications of various cultures in relation to local and global business activities. An emphasis will be field research, visits, and other activities involving Chicago-area resources. Instructional activities will include team projects, interviews, and observations to address issues related to Chicago's role in international trade and economic development for emerging markets. . Prerequisite: Junior standing, or permission of instructor.
    Cross-listed as: IREL 311
  • BUSN 342: African Culture & Business Develop
    (African Culture and Business Development.) While globalization can potentially enhance economic development and improve the quality of life, many nations, especially those in Africa, do not receive these benefits. Course emphasis will be on an analysis of efforts by businesses, community organizations, and government agencies to serve African societies plagued by poverty and other social concerns. Instructional resources will include: readings from sources with varied points of view; speakers representing countries and cultural groups; and field research visits to cultural exhibits and retail enterprises. Instructional experiences will include: (1) interviews with people familiar with various African cultures and business activities; (2) student team projects to analyze global cases for improvement of food production, water purification, health delivery, telecommunications, and educational programs and; (3) promotional activities to expand awareness of efforts to enhance economic development and quality of life in Africa. Prerequisite: Junior standing, or permission of instructor. .
    Cross-listed as: IREL 312
  • BUSN 343: Diversity in Organizations
    The focus of the course is to help students develop an ability to understand, respect, and value diversity. Through readings, discussions, and assignments students explore the application and implication of diversity to management activities. Issues related to discrimination, affirmative action, career development, socialization, and social change policies are explored. Historical, psychological, sociological, legal, and managerial viewpoints are highlighted. Prerequisite: ECON 110 with a grade of C- or better.
  • BUSN 344: Human Resource Management
    This course adopts a strategic approach to human resource management by focusing on how organizations can align their human resource management practices to their strategy to gain a competitive advantage. Specifically, students learn about recruitment, selection, training, performance management, reward systems, and other employment relations practices, and how organizations can design them to attract, motivate, and retain the best talent. Students acquire critical skills for career development that will help them stand out from their peers. The course also covers current trends and legal issues that impact human resource management. Prerequisite: ECON 110 with a grade of C- or better.
  • BUSN 345: Organizational Behavior
    This course includes theory, research, and practical application of Organizational Behavior. Organizational Behavior is the study of how individuals, groups, and workplace contexts impact behavior within an organization. The goal of this course is to help students understand what predicts and influences employee attitudes and behavior in order to improve organizational effectiveness. Topics include: personality differences, work motivation, leadership, influence processes, and group dynamics.Prerequisite: BUSN 245 with a grade of C- or better
  • BUSN 346: Entrepreneurial Marketing
    This project-based course focuses on marketing strategies that are relevant for new businesses or new product launches within a corporate setting. A broad overview of advertising development including account planning/research, the creative process, production, and media planning will be examined. Focus will be on print advertising, electronic media, digital interactive media, direct mail, and specialty advertising. Through the Entrepreneurial Marketing Analysis Project, students will have the opportunity to work with a local small business examining their current marketing and promotional strategies within the environment in which they are operating. Prerequisite: BUSN/ENTP 225 (formerly BUSN/ENTP 345).
    Cross-listed as: ENTP 346
  • BUSN 347: Global Business Strategy
    This course introduces students to strategies organizations can employ to thrive in an increasingly global business environment. The course covers various topics related to doing business globally, including conducting an environment and country risk analysis (considering culture, laws, politics, and economy), formulating a global strategic plan, and learning about global business practices such as, operations, finance, human resource management, and marketing. Prerequisite: BUSN 210 or ECON 210 or ECON 220 with a grade of C- or better.
  • BUSN 350: Capital Budgeting
    Study of advanced financial management and the evaluation of domestic and global business investment opportunities. Topics include the discounting of cash flows, foreign market risk analysis, capital asset pricing, and financial leverage decisions. Prerequisite: FIN 210.
  • BUSN 360: Global Social Entrepreneurship
    [i] How does social entrepreneurship affect local and global economics and culture? [/i] Social entrepreneurs identify problems that negatively impact a specific demographic and mobilize the resources to solve the problem. The process of social entrepreneurship involves taking direct action and measuring the impact of the solution against a stated mission. This course uses case studies, readings, and lectures to analyze the impact of social ventures while identifying social and environmental problems that are still in need of better solutions.Prerequisite: Any of the following: ENTP 110, ENTP 120, ECON 110, SOAN 110, POLS 110, POLS 120, RELG 118, or permission of instructor.(This course meets the Global Perspectives GEC requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: ENTP 360, IREL 316
  • BUSN 410: Markets, Public Policy, and Society
    This course explores the role of public policy in addressing market inefficiencies and analyzes the social costs and benefits of government intervention. Particular emphasis will be given to understanding how public policies affect firms and employees. Topics may include minimum wages, social security, immigration, taxation, education, and the affordable care act. Prerequisite: ECON 210 or BUSN 210.(This course meets the Speaking GEC requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: ECON 410
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  • BUSN 430: Federal Tax Accounting
    Advanced discussion of tax issues relating to individual and corporate income taxation. Concepts for individual taxation include gross income, exclusions, deductions, exemptions, credits, as well as property transactions. Concepts for corporate income taxation include differing tax aspects of corporations and partnerships such as formation, operations and distributions. Prerequisite: BUSN 330.
  • BUSN 460: Brand Management and Positioning
    Designed for the marketing enthusiast, this course will dive deeply into the key marketing responsibilities necessary to build strong and profitable brands. Using both theory and practice, students will address the tasks that constitute modern marketing management, including: driving the company's mission, vision and strategic plan, capturing marketing insights and performance, connecting with customers, shaping marketing offerings, and delivering and communicating value. The course is designed to be highly interactive. Through case studies, presentations, problem-solving, and hands-on activities, students will have the opportunity to apply the concepts, ideas, and strategies presented in the text and in class in their weekly work. Prerequisite: BUSN 225. Not open to students who have completed BUSN 370.
  • BUSN 470: Latin American Global Business
    Emphasizes analytic activities and case problems for corporate and entrepreneurial organizations operating or considering operations in Latin America. Economic theories, statistical tests, accounting records, financial analysis, and marketing concepts will be used to investigate business situations. Prerequisites: BUSN 130, BUSN 230, FIN 210 and one of the following ECON 210, ECON 220 or BUSN 210; or permission of instructor for Latin American Studies majors.(This course meets the Global Perspectives GEC requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: LNAM 470
  • BUSN 471: Asian Bus Culture & Trade Relations
    . Prerequisites: BUSN 130, BUSN 230, FIN 210, and one of the following three courses ECON 210, ECON 220 or BUSN 210; or permission of instructor for Asian Studies majors.(This course meets the Global Perspectives GEC requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: ASIA 471
  • BUSN 472: Global Marketing Mgmt Strategy
    (Global Marketing Management Strategy) This capstone course, for business and marketing students, emphasizes planning product strategies, supply chain channels, pricing, and promotional activities in global market settings. Using journal articles, management theories, case studies, field research, and team projects, course participants will develop and recommend cross-cultural marketing strategies for multinational companies, entrepreneurial start-ups, and nonprofits. These global marketing decisions will be based on diverse cultural, social, political, economic, environmental, and technological influences. Course coverage will also include the challenges and opportunities of market entry tactics, competitive advantage, target market analysis, pricing models, and financial elements for developing an international marketing strategy in both business-to-consumer and business-to-business markets. Students will develop career competencies involving identifying market opportunities, delivering value to customers, and assessing leadership styles required by organizations operating in international locations. Prerequisites: BUSN 225, Senior standing, or permission of instructor.(This course meets the Global Perspectives GEC requirement.)
  • BUSN 489: Globalization and Its Impact
    Examines the impact of globalization on rich countries (the United States) and poor countries (Mexico, India, and China). An examination of free trade agreements will cast light on the political motives behind these agreements as well as the economic projections made. The economic impact of the creation of free trade zones is explored using both microeconomics and macroeconomics. Statistical evidence will document whether globalization has caused growth in GDP, employment, and income in poor countries. The responsibility of multinational companies in creating sweatshops, worker exploitation, and cultural disintegration are discussed in light of U.S. businesses located in Mexico, India, and China. Prerequisites: ECON/BUSN 130 (or ECON/BUSN 180), ECON 210, and ECON 220.(This course meets the Global Perspectives and Speaking GEC requirements.)
    Cross-listed as: ECON 489
  • BUSN 490: Internship
    Provides an opportunity to supplement academic training with work experience in the field of business and economics. Interested students must work with Career Services to develop a resume and register with the instructor by the following deadlines: by April 1 for a Fall internship; by November 1 for a Spring internship; and by the week following spring break for a Summer internship. Business and Economics internships may be done for either one or two credits. Internships need to be for different experiences therefore continuation of previous internships, part-time or summer jobs is not allowed. The department will not give credit for internships that do not build directly on prior course work. Students on academic probation are ineligible for this program. Contact the Internship Supervisor for Economics and Business regarding additional information and guidelines.
    Cross-listed as: ECON 490, FIN 490

 

Economics Courses

  • ECON 110: Principles of Economics
    An introduction to both microeconomics, the theory of consumer and producer behavior, and macroeconomics, the determination of aggregate levels of production, employment, inflation, and growth. Application of economic principles to the analysis of current problems of the U.S. economy.(This course meets the Social Sciences GEC requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: IREL 110
  • ECON 129: MS Excel for E/B/F Students
    (Beginning and Intermediate Microsoft Excel Workshop for Economics, Business, & Finance Students). This experiential course allows students to learn basic and intermediate Microsoft Excel skills. These skills will be applied in future economics, business, and finance courses and in the workplace using spreadsheet software. By the end of this course, students will be able to perform spreadsheet calculations, and create professional graphs and charts from data. Skills included in this workshop are: working with formulas and functions (including regression analysis and best-fit lines), formatting a worksheet, working with charts, analyzing data using formulas, managing workbook data, using tables (including pivot tables & charts), analyzing table data, automating worksheet tasks, enhancing charts, macros & VBA, and using the "What If" analysis. Most training is conducted on an online platform with students using Excel in a simulated environment. Projects for each module are worked in Excel. Through the online platform, students follow along using the same source material that the textbook author uses throughout the lessons. This course meets for one 90-minute instructor-led session during the summer or two sessions during the fall and spring semesters in a PC computer lab. Students work independently around these meetings. The instructor hosts several office hours to provide support for students as needed. This 0.50-credit course is graded P/F and has no prerequisites.(This course meets the Technology GEC requirement.)
  • ECON 130: Applied Statistics
    Distribution analysis, sampling theory, statistical inference, and regression analysis, with emphasis on the application of statistical techniques using spreadsheet software to analyze economic and business issues. Students who have taken this course will not receive credit for MATH 150. Prerequisite or corequisite: ECON 129.(This course meets the Quantitative Reasoning GEC requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: BUSN 130, FIN 130
  • ECON 210: Microeconomic Theory
    Application of economic analysis to business decisions. It covers economic tools with applications to demand analysis, pricing policies, competitive strategy, cost analysis, and decision making. Students who have already completed Busn 210 will not receive credit for this course. Prerequisites: ECON 110 and MATH 110 or MATH 160 with grades of C- or better.
  • ECON 220: Macroeconomic Theory
    Analysis of the determinants of aggregate production, prices, interest rates, and employment in macroeconomic models that combine the business, household, government, and financial sectors. Prerequisites: ECON 110 and MATH 110 or MATH 160 with grades of C- or better.
    Cross-listed as: IREL 212
  • ECON 245: Child Labor in Latin America
    Explores the role of child labor in the economies of developing Latin American countries, focusing on the question 'Do countries need to use child labor to industrialize?' Historically, industrialized countries have relied heavily on children to work in factories and mines. Today it appears history is repeating itself as developing countries utilize children in the informal sectors. The employment of children in Brazil, Colombia, Peru, Chile, and Argentina will be examined in detail. The economic, political, social/cultural, and technological explanations for child labor will be explored for each country. Prerequisite: ECON 110.(This course meets the Global Perspectives GEC requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: LNAM 245, IREL 215
  • ECON 265: Poverty, Inequality, Discrimination
    This course explores how the discipline of economics can explain and analyze the causes and effects of poverty, inequality and discrimination. It will examine how various populations (defined by race, age, gender, class, sexual orientation, etc.) experience these differently. Students will be introduced to (1) economic theories of poverty, inequality and discrimination, (2) ways to measure each and (3) public policies designed to mitigate poverty, inequality and discrimination in the US. Since women are more likely than men to be poor and a large number of policies are aimed at women and children, particular emphasis is given to the role of gender. Prerequisite: ECON 110 with a grade of C- or better.(This course meets the Domestic Pluralism GEC requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: GSWS 265
  • ECON 280: The Mexican-American Border
    As the only place where the third world and first world touch, the Mexican-American border is unique. This course will focus on the border and how its unique location in the world has created a culture, language, politics, religion and economy that reflect the interdependence between these two neighboring countries. The course will begin with the history of the border from the Gadsden Purchase in 1854 to the passage of NAFTA in 2004 and then examine the impact of free trade on Mexico. The course will explore how people (immigration - both legal and illegal), resources (oil, workers), consumer products (household appliances, food, music, and art), environmental waste (toxic waste, water and air pollution) and technology (outsourcing) cross borders as globalization impacts both Mexicans and Americans. The course involves a three-week stay along the border in May. Pre-requisites: ECON 110 and SPAN 112 or its equivalent.(This course meets the Global Perspectives and Experiential Learning GEC requirements.)
    Cross-listed as: IREL 214, BUSN 280, LNAM 280, SPAN 201
  • ECON 310: Industrial Organization
    Analysis of the behavior of firms under different industrial structures - competitive, monopolistic, oligopolistic. An evaluation of antitrust policies and other government regulations of industry. Specific topics covered include advertising, auctions, networks, product differentiation, market standards, and vertical and horizontal integrations. Prerequisite: ECON 210 with a grade of C- or better.
  • ECON 313: Money & Banking
    Analysis of bank and nonbank financial institutions. Topics include the S&L crisis, the impact of the 1980 and 1982 deregulation acts, the changing role of the Federal Reserve and the ability to conduct effective monetary policy, and bank asset and liability management. Prerequisite: ECON 220.
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  • ECON 320: Labor Economics
    In this course, standard theories of labor economics are developed. Topics include labor supply, labor demand, education, discrimination, contracting, and unions. Particular emphasis is given to the labor force participation of married women and single mothers, earnings, wage distributions and inequality, job training, and employment benefits. Empirical analysis complements theoretical modeling, especially in the area of women's work and international comparisons regarding labor laws and labor market outcomes. . Prerequisite: ECON 210.
    Cross-listed as: GSWS 320
  • ECON 325: Economics of Land
    (The Economics of Land: Valuation, Use, and Taxation) The course examines several different roles of land in the economy; as a productive asset, as an investment, as a store of value, and as a base for taxation. Topics to be covered include various definitions of property rights, regulatory policy toward land use and land preservation, models of land valuation, and the theory and practice of property taxation and tax preferences. We will examine policies across different states, countries, and eras. Prerequisite: ECON 210.
  • ECON 330: Econometrics
    Use of statistical methods, especially multiple regression, to test hypotheses based on economic theory. Some use of computer programs. Prerequisites: ECON/BUSN/FIN 130, MATH 110, and either ECON 210 or ECON 220.(This course meets the Technology GEC requirement.)
  • ECON 340: Environ & Natural Resource Econ
    (Environmental and Natural Resource Economics) Examines different economic theories regarding optimal use of renewable and nonrenewable resources, why market responses to pollution are typically unsatisfactory, and optimal pollution control. These theories are then applied to the real world, taking into consideration political and technological constraints. The impact of past and current policy on the environment will be studied, as will the potential impact of proposed legislation. Prerequisite: ECON 210 or permission of the instructor.
    Cross-listed as: ES 340
  • ECON 345: Economics and Law
    This course covers an economic analysis of laws and legal institutions with an emphasis on how they affect markets and individual decision-making. Topics covered will include property, contract, tort, criminal, environmental, and antitrust laws. Prerequisite: ECON 210.
  • ECON 350: Public Finance
    Theory and policy analysis of the effects of government spending and taxation on the allocation and distribution of income. Special attention is given to tax reform proposals and other current policy issues. Prerequisite: ECON 210.
  • ECON 360: Health Economics
    Examines how economic analysis can be applied to various components of the health care system. Microeconomic theory is used to understand the operation of health care markets and the behavior of participants (consumers, insurers, physicians, and hospitals) in the health care industry. International comparisons and the role of the public sector will be included. Prerequisites: ECON 210.
  • ECON 375: Economics of Sport
    The purpose of this course is to analyze the economics of sport. Sport throughout the world has a distinct and substantial commercial character, and developments in the world of modern sport cannot be fully understood without applying economic principles and methodology. Topics discussed include the market for players, the implications of the functioning of league monopolies, and an analysis of the economic impact of stadiums and mega-sports events such as the World Cup and the Olympic Games. Prerequisite: ECON 210.
  • ECON 380: Game Theory
    Game theory is the study of purposeful behavior in strategic situations. Game theory incorporates mathematical models of conflict and cooperation in situations of uncertainty (about nature and about decision makers). Various solution concepts such as Nash equilibrium, subgame perfect equilibrium, Bayesian and perfect Bayesian equilibrium will be analyzed. These concepts will be illustrated using a variety of economic models, from industrial organization, bargaining, the role of repeated interaction, and models of asymmetric information. Prerequisites: ECON 210 and MATH 110.
  • ECON 381: Economics of Development
    Studies the problem of sustaining accelerated economic growth in less-developed countries. This course emphasizes the issues of growth; poverty and inequality; how land labor and credit affect economic development; problems of capital formation, economic planning and international specialization and trade; and the interaction of industrialization, agricultural development, and population change. Prerequisite: ECON 210.(This course meets the Global Perspectives GEC requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: IREL 318
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  • ECON 385: Mathematical Economics
    Calculus and linear algebra are applied to the analysis of microeconomic and macroeconomic theory. The tools of mathematical optimization are developed with a particular focus on comparative statics. Issues of discrete and continuous time and uncertainty in economics are explored. Prerequisites: MATH 111 and either ECON 210 or 220; or permission of instructor.
  • ECON 410: Markets, Public Policy, and Society
    This course explores the role of public policy in addressing market inefficiencies and analyzes the social costs and benefits of government intervention. Particular emphasis will be given to understanding how public policies affect firms and employees. Topics may include minimum wages, social security, immigration, taxation, education, and the affordable care act. Prerequisite: ECON 210 or BUSN 210.(This course meets the Speaking GEC requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: BUSN 410
  • ECON 430: International Trade Theory & Policy
    Analysis of elements of economic structure that determine trade flows, theory relating to how trade flows alter economic structure, the free trade versus protectionism argument, and selected topics in international economic integration and development. . Prerequisites: ECON 210 and ECON 220; and junior or senior standing.
  • ECON 431: International Finance
    Identifies and analyzes fundamentals of international financial theory. Topics include exchange rate determination, balance of payments accounting, and international monetary systems and their evolution. Prerequisites: Economics 210 and 220; and junior or senior standing.
    Cross-listed as: FIN 431
  • ECON 440: Advanced Macroeconomics
    Analysis and comparison of Keynesian, neoKeynesian, neoclassical, monetarist, and rational expectationist perspectives on macroeconomic theory and stabilization policy. Prerequisites: MATH 110 and ECON 220; and junior or senior standing.
  • ECON 483: Behavioral Economics and Finance
    This course surveys research incorporating evidence from psychology into economic and financial decision-making theory. The aim of the course is to understand economic and financial models that more realistically explain and predict observed outcomes. The course explores prospect theory, biases in probabilistic judgment, projections biases, default effects, self-control problems, mental accounting, fairness and altruism. Students will use these tools to understand public goods contributions, financial market anomalies, consumption and savings behavior and myriad market outcomes. Prerequisites: ECON/BUSN/FIN 130 (or ECON/BUSN 180) and ECON 210.
    Cross-listed as: FIN 483
  • ECON 489: Globalization and Its Impact
    Examines the impact of globalization on rich countries (the United States) and poor countries (Mexico, India, and China). An examination of free trade agreements will cast light on the political motives behind these agreements as well as the economic projections made. The economic impact of the creation of free trade zones is explored using both microeconomics and macroeconomics. Statistical evidence will document whether globalization has caused growth in GDP, employment, and income in poor countries. The responsibility of multinational companies in creating sweatshops, worker exploitation, and cultural disintegration are discussed in light of U.S. businesses located in Mexico, India, and China. Prerequisites: ECON/BUSN 130 (or ECON/BUSN 180), ECON 210, and ECON 220.(This course meets the Global Perspectives and Speaking GEC requirements.)
    Cross-listed as: BUSN 489
  • ECON 490: Internship
    Provides an opportunity to supplement academic training with work experience in the field of business and economics. Interested students must work with Career Services to develop a resume and register with the instructor by the following deadlines: by April 1 for a Fall internship; by November 1 for a Spring internship; and by the week following spring break for a Summer internship. Business and Economics internships may be done for either one or two credits. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, Economics 110 with a grade of C- or better as well as other designated courses relevant to the internship and earning a C or better in combination of these courses and Economics 110. Internships need to be for different experiences therefore continuation of previous internships, part-time or summer jobs is not allowed. The department will not give credit for internships that do not build directly on prior course work. Students on academic probation are ineligible for this program. Contact the Internship Supervisor for Economics and Business regarding additional information and guidelines.
    Cross-listed as: BUSN 490, FIN 490