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Environmental Studies

Endangered Species and Languages (ES 368)

Both species and languages can become endangered and go extinct. This course examines the similarities and differences between species and languages in their formation, their evolution, their relationships to each other, and their extinction.

We ask what it means to save a species or a language. We consider whether some species are of higher conservation value than others and whether the same is true of languages.

        Cherokee Syllabary, work of Chief Sequoya, circa 1821