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Student Life

Counseling Services

Counseling Services 2019-2020

There will be no in-person appointments at the Health and Wellness Center.

All phone consultations, for both Health and Counseling must be scheduled -To schedule: call (847) 735-5240 (leave message) or email healthandwellness@lakeforest.edu.

There will be no walk-in hours for the Health and Wellness Center, but there will be same-day phone consultations, however, you will need to schedule a same day phone consultation. - To schedule: call (847) 735-5240 (leave message) or email healthandwellness@lakeforest.edu

Mental Health Emergencies (outside of normal business hours M-F 8:30-5:00)
Crisis Counselor on Call:
224-501-1621

As our community adapts in response to the COVID-19 outbreak, it is normal to feel stressed, anxious, or overwhelmed. As part of our commitment to our students’whole health, we are working with SilverCloud, a clinically proven online mental health platform, to offer programs that build resilience, help you manage anxiety or depression, and help you develop skills to manage stress and sleep issues. Based on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), mindfulness and positive psychology, these action-oriented programs build self-awareness and self-management skills for your emotional health. 

To sign-up, please visit gsh.silvercloudhealth.com/signup/ and choose Lake Forest College from the dropdown list to get started.
Please note, to confirm your eligibility, you will need to use your school-issued mx.lakeforest.edu email address. This service is confidential and  your e-mail address will not be used outside of the SilverCloud Platform.

SilverCloud Health

SilverCloud-Making-Space-For-Healthy-Minds

SilverCloud is a secure, anonymous platform that offers a suite of programs designed to help students think and feel better. Programs are developed by clinicians and address depression, anxiety and stress.

SilverCloud-Space-from-Anxiety-Stress-Depression

Each program consists of several modules that use Cognitive Behavioral Therapy principles to treat, reduce and alleviate symptoms. Modules contain content, tools, videos, personal stories and activities that will empower you to self-manage your emotional health.

To start on your path to better managing your well being, visit gsh.silvercloudhealth.com/signup/ and choose Lake Forest College from the dropdown list to get started.

For more information, check out the SilverCloud Health Flyer.

Mental Health and Coping During COVID-19 | CDC

Manage Anxiety & Stress due to COVID 19

Stress and Coping

The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) may be stressful for people. Fear and anxiety about a disease can be overwhelming and cause strong emotions in adults and children. Coping with stress will make you, the people you care about, and your community stronger.

Everyone reacts differently to stressful situations.  How you respond to the outbreak can depend on your background, the things that make you different from other people, and  the community you live in.

People who may respond more strongly to the stress of a crisis include

  • Older people and people with chronic diseases who are at higher risk for COVID-19
  • Children and teens
  • People who are helping with the response to COVID-19, like doctors and other health care providers, or first responders
  • People who have mental health conditions including problems with substance use

If you, or someone you care about, are feeling overwhelmed with emotions like sadness, depression, or anxiety, or feel like you want to harm yourself or others call

  • 911
  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA’s) Disaster Distress Helpline: 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746. (TTY 1-800-846-8517)

Stress during an infectious disease outbreak can include

  • Fear and worry about your own health and the health of your loved ones
  • Changes in sleep or eating patterns
  • Difficulty sleeping or concentrating
  • Worsening of chronic health problems
  • Increased use of alcohol, tobacco, or other drugs

People with preexisting mental health conditions should continue with their treatment and be aware of new or worsening symptoms. Additional information can be found at the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSAexternal icon) website.

Taking care of yourself, your friends, and your family can help you cope with stress. Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.

Things you can do to support yourself

  • Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body. Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced meals, exercise regularly, get plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind. Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others. Talk with people you trust about your concerns and how you are feeling.

Call your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row.

Reduce stress in yourself and others

Sharing the facts about COVID-19 and understanding the actual risk to yourself and people you care about can make an outbreak less stressful..

When you share accurate information about COVID-19 you can help make people feel less stressed and allow you to connect with them.

Learn more about taking care of your emotional health.

For parents

Children and teens react, in part, on what they see from the adults around them. When parents and caregivers deal with the COVID-19 calmly and confidently, they can provide the best support for their children. Parents can be more reassuring to others around them, especially children, if they are better prepared.

Not all children and teens respond to stress in the same way. Some common changes to watch for include

  • Excessive crying or irritation in younger children
  • Returning to behaviors they have outgrown (for example, toileting accidents or bedwetting)
  • Excessive worry or sadness
  • Unhealthy eating or sleeping habits
  • Irritability and “acting out” behaviors in teens
  • Poor school performance or avoiding school
  • Difficulty with attention and concentration
  • Avoidance of activities enjoyed in the past
  • Unexplained headaches or body pain
  • Use of alcohol, tobacco, or other drugs

There are many things you can do to support your child

  • Take time to talk with your child or teen about the COVID-19 outbreak. Answer questions and share facts about COVID-19 in a way that your child or teen can understand.
  • Reassure your child or teen that they are safe. Let them know it is ok if they feel upset. Share with them how you deal with your own stress so that they can learn how to cope from you.
  • Limit your family’s exposure to news coverage of the event, including social media. Children may misinterpret what they hear and can be frightened about something they do not understand.
  • Try to keep up with regular routines. If schools are closed, create a schedule for learning activities and relaxing or fun activities.
  • Be a role model.  Take breaks, get plenty of sleep, exercise, and eat well. Connect with your friends and family members.

Learn more about helping children cope.

For responders

Responding to COVID-19 can take an emotional toll on you. There are things you can do to reduce secondary traumatic stress (STS) reactions:

  • Acknowledge that STS can impact anyone helping families after a traumatic event.
  • Learn the symptoms including physical (fatigue, illness) and mental (fear, withdrawal, guilt).
  • Allow time for you and your family to recover from responding to the pandemic.
  • Create a menu of personal self-care activities that you enjoy, such as spending time with friends and family, exercising, or reading a book.
  • Take a break from media coverage of COVID-19.
  • Ask for help if you feel overwhelmed or concerned that COVID-19 is affecting your ability to care for your family and patients as you did before the outbreak.

Learn more tips for taking care of yourself during emergency response.

For people who have been released from quarantine

Being separated from others if a healthcare provider thinks you may have been exposed to COVID-19 can be stressful, even if you do not get sick. Everyone feels differently after coming out of quarantine. Some feelings include :

  • Mixed emotions, including relief after quarantine
  • Fear and worry about your own health and the health of your loved ones
  • Stress from the experience of monitoring yourself or being monitored by others for signs and symptoms of COVID-19
  • Sadness, anger, or frustration because friends or loved ones have unfounded fears of contracting the disease from contact with you, even though you have been determined not to be contagious
  • Guilt about not being able to perform normal work or parenting duties during quarantine
  • Other emotional or mental health changes

We all experience times of change and transition in our lives. Sometimes this process is orderly and understandable. At other times it can be rapid, chaotic, and upsetting. Understanding, coping, and dealing with these times can be difficult.

When we need help we often turn to family and friends. Sometimes we need the assistance of a trained professional to work with people in the process of exploring and solving problems in their lives. We would like to welcome you to Counseling Services with the hope that our services will be helpful to you.

Mission Statement

The Health and Wellness Center’s mental health professionals assist students in overcoming personal, emotional, and psychological issues that may negatively impact their ability to reach their academic goals and to make the most of their educational experience at Lake Forest College. We educate students about mental health and wellness issues and teach them about healthy lifestyle choices. We strive to assist students in acquiring the skills, attitudes, and resources necessary to both succeed in the college environment and pursue satisfying and productive lives.

A core component of our mission is the promotion and affirmation of our community diversity in its broadest sense. We recognize that a diverse community enriches our campus and enhances opportunities for human understanding, both of which contribute to the learning environment for all. The Health and Wellness Center has a strong commitment to meeting the needs of diverse people. In all clinical, assessment, training, psychiatric, program, and outreach services we strive to create an environment where all people feel welcome and respected. As a staff, we attempt to facilitate mutual respect and understanding among people of diverse racial, ethnic, and national backgrounds, gender, sexual/affectional orientations, mental and physical abilities, languages, classes, ages, religious/spiritual beliefs, socioeconomic background as well as other types of diversity. We strive to nurture environments where similarities and differences among people are recognized, respected, and honored.

 

Have the student health insurance plan offered by the College? Cigna has 24/7 CareConnect: 888-857-5462. CareConnect counselors will provide in-the-moment support and determine the most clinically-appropriate next step. This includes counseling, or referrals to the Health and Wellness Center, medical provider, or emergency services.