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Course Descriptions

  • AFAM 110: Intro to African American Studies
    This course provides an overview of African American history and culture. Topics include major events, persons, and issues spanning the period from the African heritage to contemporary times. Students survey the evolution of African American expressive culture in music, literature, film, art, and dance. The course includes lectures, discussions, and video presentations. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: AMER 101
  • AFAM 205: Psychology of Prejudice
    In this course we will explore psychological approaches to understanding stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination?the psychology of prejudice, for short. We will examine research and theory on topics such as historical changes in the nature of intergroup attitudes; the prevalence of prejudice in the U.S. today; the impact of stereotyping and discrimination on members of stigmatized groups; likely causes of prejudice; the psychological processes underlying different forms of prejudice (e.g., based on race, ethnicity, class, religion, gender, sexual orientation, age, ability, or appearance); and methods of combating prejudice, encouraging acceptance of diversity, and improving intergroup relations. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: PSYC 205, AMER 201
  • AFAM 216: African American Literature I
    A study of slave narratives and contemporary revisions. Includes works by Equiano, Douglass, Delaney, Jacobs, Morrison, Johnson, and Williams. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: ENGL 216, AMER 216
  • AFAM 217: African American Literature II
    An examination of narrative attempts before, during, and after the Harlem Renaissance to move from imposed stereotypes toward more accurate representations of African American experiences. Includes works by Chesnutt, Du Bois, Hurston, Larsen, Hughes, Toomer, Baldwin, and Walker. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: ENGL 217, AMER 217
  • AFAM 218: Blues Women in African Amer Lit
    An analysis of the representation of "blues women" and the music in writings by African Americans. Authors include Larsen, Hurston, Morrison, Wilson, Jones, and Walker. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: ENGL 218, AMER 218, GSWS 218
  • AFAM 219: African Politics
    A survey of the geography, social and political history, and postindependent politics of Black Africa. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: POLS 217, AFAM 219
  • AFAM 221: Cultures of Modern Africa
    (Offered Less Frequently) Introduction to contemporary rural and urban society in sub-Saharan Africa, drawing on materials from all major regions of the subcontinent. Particular emphasis will be on problems of rural development, rural-urban migration, and structural changes of economic, political, and social formations in the various new nations. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: SOAN 221, IREL 271
  • AFAM 223: African American Envirnmntl Culture
    (African American Environmental Culture from Slavery to Environmental Justice). Until the environmental justice movement rose to prominence over the past few decades and invited a more critical perspective on the connection between race and the environment, popular understanding of the American environmental (and environmentalist) tradition had effectively been whitewashed. But why? This course will work to find answers to that question while unearthing the deeper roots of African American environmental culture in conversation with key moments in African American history?from slavery to sharecropping, from migration and urbanization to environmental justice. With an interdisciplinary approach that considers sources as diverse as slave narratives, fiction, poetry, songs, photographs, maps, and ethnographies, we will consider African American intellectuals, writers, visual and musical artists, and everyday citizens not always associated with environmental thought, from W.E.B. Du Bois and Zora Neale Hurston to the Black Panthers and the victims of Flint, Michigan?s, water crisis. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: ES 223
  • AFAM 227: History of Jazz
    Principal styles of representative jazz musicians; the roots (including blues and ragtime); jazz in New Orleans and Chicago; and big band, swing, bop, and fusion. No prerequisite. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: MUSC 227, AMER 227
  • AFAM 237: African American Religions
    This course is an exploration of the rich diversity of African American religions from the colonial period to the present. Attention will be given to key figures, institutional expressions as well as significant movements in North America, the Caribbean and broader Black Atlantic. Major themes include African traditions in American religions, slavery and religion, redemptive suffering, sacred music, social protest, Black Nationalism, African American women and religion, religion in hip hop and secularity in black religious literature. Students will learn about the ways these themes have often served both as unique contributions to and critiques of America?s political establishment and social landscape. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: RELG 237, AMER 230
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  • AFAM 238: Hip-Hop, Race, & Culture
    A musical examination of the roles hip-hop, the hip-hop community and mainstream popular culture have played in reinforcing, critiquing and disrupting racial identity in the United States. In 1988, after the release of their hit, "F**k tha Police", the American hip-hop group N.W.A. was considered a danger to the nation, something akin to a terrorist group. In 1970, just prior to the advent of hip-hop and when funk music, hip-hop's precursor, was coming into full bloom, anthropologist Margaret Meade and author James Baldwin sat down for an extended discussion about race. During the course of their conversation, Meade pointed out that, biologically speaking, there is no such thing as race, that the notion of race is a myth. Baldwin agreed, but noted that when they both walked outside, that very same myth could get him killed. Music and race matter. This course traces the history and significance of hip-hop music, focusing on the social forces that created the genre and the impact the genre has had on society?s notions of race. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: MUSC 237
  • AFAM 241: African American Drama and Theater
    This course surveys the work African American theater artists from the nineteenth century to the present day. Playwrights surveyed may include Richardson, Hughes, Hansberry, Childress, Bullins, Baraka, Fuller, Wilson, Cleage, Shange, and Parks. Readings are supplemented by field trips to Chicago theaters that feature African American plays. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: THTR 241, ENGL 241
  • AFAM 250: Dialogue: Race, Ethnicity, Religion
    In a culturally and socially diverse society, exploring issues of difference, conflict, and community is needed to facilitate understanding and improve relations between social/cultural groups. In this course, students will engage in meaningful discussion of controversial, challenging, and divisive issues in society related to race, ethnicity, and religion. Students will be challenged to increase personal awareness of their own cultural experience, expand knowledge of the historic and social realities of other cultural groups, and take action as agents of positive social change in their communities. This course requires a high level of participation from all students. Note: This course earns .5 credits. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: ETHC 250, RELG 221
  • AFAM 254: African American History
    A survey of African American history from the sixteenth century to the present, with attention to important themes and events: the African heritage; slavery and the response to bondage; emancipation and reconstruction; African American society under Jim Crow; the northern migrations and the making of the urban ghettos; African American debates on freedom and models of Black leadership in the twentieth century; aspects of contemporary African American America. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: HIST 230
  • AFAM 258: Spike Lee and Black Aesthetics
    As one of the greatest filmmakers of all time, Spike Lee is both loathed and loved. His films challenge the stereotypes and paternalistic assumptions about African Americans that have become sacrosanct in America's popular imagination. We will explore how the aesthetic representation of race, class, and gender in Spike Lee's filmography have helped create a new genre of film called African American noir. In so doing, we will watch several of Spike Lee's films, documentary projects, and television ads. Ultimately, our goal will be to appreciate Lee's cinematic technique, examine his critique of white supremacy, and consider the cultural and historical events that have shaped his artistic vision. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: PHIL 258, CINE 258
  • AFAM 270: Race and Criminal Justice
    This course will examine the systemic racial injustices inherent in American criminal jurisprudence from police interaction to trial and sentencing, incarceration, and supervised release. Students will study how racial injustice continues to pervade the American criminal justice system despite the constitutional guarantees of equal protection and due process. How do so many players, from police officers to judges and juries, fail to protect against racial injustice? Why do courts, when confronted with allegations or proof of racially motivated police misconduct, overwhelmingly cite "harmless error" doctrine? To attempt to answer these complicated questions, students will learn legal criminal procedure, study 4th, 5th, 6th and 8th amendment case law, and have an opportunity to listen to and speak with a variety of professionals in the criminal justice field. Prerequisite: POLS 120 or permission of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: POLS 270, AMER 274
  • AFAM 271: African American Philosophy
    African-American philosophy can be defined in two ways: (1) wide-ranging philosophical work done by Americans of recent black African descent and (2) philosophical work on the lived experience of Americans of recent black African descent. We will primarily read philosophers whose philosophical work emphasizes the African-American experience. Thematically, the course will be guided by one overriding question: Given the historical reality of the Atlantic Slave Trade, the Three-Fifths Compromise, the anti-miscegenation laws, the Fugitive Slave Law, Lynch Law, and the Jim Crow laws, among many other inhumane practices, how does the experience of Africans in America constitute a unique combination of philosophical perspectives? Once we answer this question, we will understand how the African-American experience has created a new tradition in Western philosophy. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: PHIL 271
  • AFAM 310: Equity & Social Justice in Educ
    (Equity and Social Justice in Education) This course intends to examine notions of 'equity' and 'social justice' in the context of three aspects of education: the historical founding of U.S. schools on oppressive ideals; the ways in which race, gender, and sexual orientation affect and disrupt one's experiences of schooling; and the evolution of the efforts to work against these phenomena within the field of education. The course will explore equity and social justice from a variety of perspectives and through different texts, including analytical journal articles and personal narratives. Readings and discussions will be based heavily on the local world of public education as a microcosm of these issues as they have played out nationally and internationally. Not open to first-year students. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: EDUC 310, ETHC 340
  • AFAM 312: Black Metropolis
    (Black Metropolis: A Study of Black Life in Chicago). This course is a study of race and urban life in Chicago. From the founding of Chicago by a black man to the participation of blacks in the rebuilding of the city following the Great Chicago fire, and into an exploration of Bronzeville, 'a city within a city,' this course will highlight blacks and their contributions to this great city. Study of landmark texts, documentaries, novels, and photography, along with at least one field trip to the Chicago area, will reveal the impact of the Great Migration on the city; contributions of talented musicians, writers, and photographers involved in the Chicago Renaissance; and the origins of the famous black Chicago newspaper, the Chicago Defender, including its regular column by Langston Hughes. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: ENGL 312, AMER 312
  • AFAM 325: Black Literature of the 60s
    (Black Literature of the 60s and its Legacy.) A study of the literature produced by major participants in the Black Arts and Civil Rights movements, along with an examination of writings after the 60s to determine the legacy of the themes of protest and social change. Authors may include Amiri Baraka, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King Jr., Haki Madhubuti, Sonia Sanchez, Assata Shakur, Eldridge Cleaver, Gil Scott-Heron, Angela Davis, Tupac Shakur, Jay Z, M.K. Asante, Jr., Common, Ice Cube, Lupe Fiasco, among others. Prerequisite: English 217 or permission of the instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: ENGL 325, AMER 325
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  • AFAM 328: Diasporan Writings
    (Diasporan Writings from Contemporary Black Writers). This course presents stories by immigrants of African descent from throughout the Caribbean as well as African writers, and significant writings by American authors of African descent. These works will illustrate the scope and variety of aesthetic, cultural, and political concerns that have motivated the authors. Course may include Jamaica Kincaid, Edwidge Danticat, Michelle Cliff, Paule Marshall, George Lamming, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Ngugi wa Thiong'o, Tsitsi Dangarembga, J. Nozipo Maraire, Edward P. Jones, Suzan Lori-Parks, Natasha Tretheway, Rita Dove, Walter Mosley, M. K. Asante. Authors will vary with different semesters. Prerequisite: (Diasporan Writings from Contemporary Black Writers). This course presents stories by immigrants of African descent from throughout the Caribbean as well as African writers, and significant writings by American authors of African descent. These works will illustrate the scope and variety of aesthetic, cultural, and political concerns that have motivated the authors. Course may include Jamaica Kincaid, Edwidge Danticat, Michelle Cliff, Paule Marshall, George Lamming, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Ngugi wa Thiong'o, Tsitsi Dangarembga, J. Nozipo Maraire, Edward P. Jones, Suzan Lori-Parks, Natasha Tretheway, Rita Dove, Walter Mosley, M. K. Asante. Authors will vary with different semesters. Prerequisite: ENGL/AFAM 216 or 217 or permission of Instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement.) (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: ENGL 328
  • AFAM 330: History and Philosophy of Slavery
    An examination of American slavery and its aftermath from the slave ship to the Age of Neo-slavery. We will read slave narratives, historical accounts of slavery, and philosophical interpretations of slavery from the black radical tradition and contemporary philosophy. All three approaches will provide us with multiple angles from which to consider the institution of slavery and America?s supposed commitment to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. On the whole, our aim will be to wrestle with the tortured logic that is the tragic contradiction of American slavery and American freedom. Prerequisites: AFAM 110, one philosophy course, or permission of the instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: PHIL 330
  • AFAM 361: Civil Rights Movement
    This course focuses on the origins, development, and accomplishments of the civil rights movement in post-World War II America. Particular emphasis will be given to the differences between the struggle for black equality in the south and its northern counterpart. Taught in a seminar format, the class will be both reading- and writing-intensive. Course readings and paper assignments are designed to help students develop a comparative analytical framework and to illuminate the following lines of inquiry: What caused and what sustained the civil rights movement? What changes took place within the movement over time, particularly at the level of leadership? What underlay the radicalization of the movement and what were the consequences? To what extent did the civil rights movement succeed and how do we measure that success today? Finally, how did the black civil rights movement inspire other groups and minorities in American society to organize? Prerequisite: History 200 or History 201. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: HIST 306, AMER 361
  • AFAM 380: Black Cinema
    Black Cinema addresses a range of periods and movements in Black Cinema: the Los Angeles School (for example Haile Gerima), Blaxploitation and its critics, Women directors (Leslie Harris, Julie Dash, Yvonne Welbon, Kasi Lemmons) critiques of Hollywood (ex: Robert Townsend's Hollywood Shuffle) and a unit on Spike Lee. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: COMM 380

 

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  • AMER 101: Intro to African American Studies
    This course provides an overview of African American history and culture. Topics include major events, persons, and issues spanning the period from the African heritage to contemporary times. Students survey the evolution of African American expressive culture in music, literature, film, art, and dance. The course includes lectures, discussions, and video presentations. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    AFAM 110
  • AMER 110: Introduction to American Studies
    Have Americans always shared a common culture, or do the differences between us outweigh what unites us? In this introduction to the field of American Studies, we will explore key debates about what it means to be American, specially the impact of gender, race, ethnicity, and class on definitions of American identity, whether singular or collective. We will study mainly historical, political, and literary texts, especially first-person, nonfiction texts like letters, speeches, essays, and autobiographies in verse and prose. Students will also get a taste of the multidisciplinary nature of American Studies through film, music, dance, creative research projects, and guest speakers. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • AMER 119: Introduction to American Politics
    Origins of the American political system, basic institutions, political parties and interest groups, and evolution of constitutional interpretation.
    POLS 120
  • AMER 175: Introduction to Film Studies
    This course addresses basic topics in cinema studies, including: cinema technique, film production style, the basic language of film criticism, genres of cinema, movements from the history of cinema, and film criticism. Many topics are addressed through careful analysis of particularly important and representative films and directors. No prerequisites.
    CINE 175
  • AMER 200: Topics: Grateful Dead Amer Culture
    Spring 2017 Topic: The Grateful Dead and American Culture. More than fifty years after the band?s founding, the Grateful Dead looms larger than ever. From Haight-Ashbury acid-testers to visionary entrepreneurs, the band that grew up and out of the revolutions of the tumultuous 1960s found a way to mix everything from roots music to free jazz to rock into an "endless tour" that put them in the Fortune 500. The Grateful Dead provided a cultural soundtrack for not only the 1960s, but also the paranoia of the Watergate years, the Reagan-soaked 1980s, and on to the jam-band present. This course will focus on the band?s performance of authentic "Americanness" throughout its half century run. We'll listen to their music, and also to their fans, enthusiasts, and scholars. We'll understand the various subcultures that separate the sixties and now, and in doing so, offer answers to this key question: Why do the Dead survive? (Elective for English, Theater, and Music)
    AMER 480, ENGL 251, MUSC 222, THTR 206
  • AMER 201: Psychology of Prejudice
    In this course we will explore psychological approaches to understanding stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination?the psychology of prejudice, for short. We will examine research and theory on topics such as historical changes in the nature of intergroup attitudes; the prevalence of prejudice in the U.S. today; the impact of stereotyping and discrimination on members of stigmatized groups; likely causes of prejudice; the psychological processes underlying different forms of prejudice (e.g., based on race, ethnicity, class, religion, gender, sexual orientation, age, ability, or appearance); and methods of combating prejudice, encouraging acceptance of diversity, and improving intergroup relations. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    PSYC 205, AFAM 205
  • AMER 203: Early American Literature
    A survey of early American literature including Native American oral stories and trickster tales, Puritan literature, Smith and Pocahontas accounts, captivity narratives, voices of nationalism, early slave narratives, and women's letters.
    ENGL 203
  • AMER 204: Nineteenth Century American Lit
    Works of representative writers: Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Thoreau, Emerson, Whitman, Dickinson, and Twain. Topics of discussion include Emerson's influence on American culture, developments in American literary form, and themes of American community and nature.
    ENGL 204
  • AMER 205: Twentieth Century American Lit
    Works of representative writers. Topics of discussion include American identity and the 'American dream,' developments in literary form, and the social and political values of modern literature.
  • AMER 206: American Environmental Lit
    An historically organized survey of the various rhetorics through which nature has been understood by Americans from the Puritans to contemporary writers: the Calvinist fallen landscape, the rational continent of the American Enlightenment, conservation and 'wise use,' and preservation and 'biodiversity.'
    ENGL 206, ES 206
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  • AMER 207: Literature of Place: Chicago
    This course will examine Chicago history and literature by privileging its location. In other words, we will consider the city and its environs as central characters in the stories we study, moving through the history of the region with a narrative lens. This method will suggest the ever-changing character traits of Chicago as it develops from Pottawatomie war plain to fur trading post to early mercantile settlement to booming and (for a time) busting metropolis. We will begin with accounts of the Joliet expedition along with narratives of early settlers to the region. Other readings will draw from classic works by Jane Addams, Theodore Dreiser, John Dos Passos, Richard Wright, and Saul Bellow, Thomas Pynchon, Joe Meno, and Stuart Dybek, among others. Additionally, these narratives will be read in the context of theoretical offerings in ecocriticism. Students should keep Friday afternoons free for a series of field trips, to be scheduled well in advance.
    ENGL 207, ES 207
  • AMER 208: Archaeological Field School
    Archaeological Field Methods introduces students to the discipline of archaeology, with an emphasis on fieldwork and excavation. Students will serve as the field crew on an archaeological dig in Chicago, with lectures, readings, workshops, and field trips providing the theoretical and historical context for the archaeological methods. Students will learn excavation, recording, laboratory and analytical techniques via some traditional coursework, but most significantly, through participation. Students will have the opportunity to experiment with these techniques, discuss the implications of their findings, and compare them with the research and ideas of professional archaeologists. No prerequisites.
    SOAN 205
  • AMER 209: Baseball in Chicago
    America's favorite pastime runs strong in Chicago. From the infamous 1919 "Black Sox" Scandal to Wrigley Field's recent renovations, this is a sport that inspires lifelong loyalties and city-wide rivalries. This course will use a methodological framework to cover everything from from graft to greatness, as we achieve a longitudinal appreciation of baseball's cultural import. Through the lens of baseball we will view Chicago's past and possible future, and we will inquire as to how a variety of academic disciplines, including history, sociology, anthropology, economics, politics, and religion help to illuminate our understanding of America's national (and Chicago's local) pastime. No prerequisites.
  • AMER 210: Foundations American Republic
    (Foundations of the American Republic) The origins of American society and the development of the United States from an under-developed new nation into a powerful national entity. Emphasis on the reading and analysis of documentary materials. (Meets GEC First-Year Writing Requirement.)
    HIST 200
  • AMER 211: Modern America
    America's response to industrialism and its changing role in foreign affairs. Emphasis on the techniques of research and paper writing. (Meets GEC First-Year Writing Requirement.)
    HIST 201
  • AMER 212: Educational Reform in the U.S.
    This course will explore the meaning of educational reform in the United States, both from a historical and philosophical perspective and in the context of contemporary educational policy. Students will begin the course by studying the progressive educational reform movement of the early twentieth century. They will look at ways in which progressive education initiatives, including the open education movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s, have been challenged by proponents of standardization in schools. Charter schools, magnet schools, school vouchers, and No Child Left Behind also will be examined in order to better understand how the notion of educational reform is one that can be viewed from a wide variety of perspectives and within multiple contexts.
    EDUC 212, PHIL 214
  • AMER 213: Ritual in Contemporary America
    This course examines how ceremonies, festivals and other performative events enrich and define community. This study of ritual may include street fairs, parades, weddings, funerals, feasts and fasts as well as other public and private behaviors that comprise the diversity of American ritual life. Our course shall explore ritual as it occurs in many of the ethnic, racial, subcultural and countercultural communities in Chicago. We will investigate and attempt to understand both the invention and re-invention of community and personal identity through ritual action. Students should anticipate frequent field trips. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    SOAN 275, THTR 235
  • AMER 215: Archaeological Field Methods
    Archaeological Field Methods introduces students to the discipline of archaeology, with an emphasis on fieldwork and excavation. Students will serve as the field crew on an archaeological dig in Lake Forest, with lectures, readings, workshops, and field trips providing the theoretical and historical context for the archaeological methods. Students will learn excavation, recording, laboratory and analytical techniques via some traditional coursework, but most significantly, through participation. Students will have the opportunity to experiment with these techniques, discuss the implications of their findings, and compare them with the research and ideas of professional archaeologists. No prerequisites. Corequisites: This course has an additional weekly lab session (2 hrs). Not open to students who have taken SOAN 205.
    SOAN 215
  • AMER 216: African American Literature I
    A study of slave narratives and contemporary revisions. Includes works by Equiano, Douglass, Delaney, Jacobs, Morrison, Johnson, and Williams. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ENGL 216, AFAM 216
  • AMER 217: African American Literature II
    An examination of narrative attempts before, during, and after the Harlem Renaissance to move from imposed stereotypes toward more accurate representations of African American experiences. Includes works by Chesnutt, Du Bois, Hurston, Larsen, Hughes, Toomer, Baldwin, and Walker. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ENGL 217, AFAM 217
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  • AMER 218: Blues Women in African Amer Lit
    An analysis of the representation of 'blues women' and the music in writings by African Americans. Authors include Larsen, Hurston, Morrison, Wilson, Jones, and Walker. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ENGL 218, AFAM 218, GSWS 218
  • AMER 219: American Art
    The visual arts in North America, covering painting, sculpture, architecture, and the applied domestic arts, from the Colonial period to the present.
    ART 219
  • AMER 220: Religion and Politics in the USA
    This course focuses on the ways religion has been a source of political division and unity in America. Polls indicate that America is, by far, the most religious of industrial democracies and that our contentious political debates are, in large part, due to the religious dimensions of morally evocative issues like abortion and gay marriage, and the firm positions of such constituencies as the Christian Right and new Religious Left. Historically, public debates concerning abolition, suffrage and temperance drew on scholarly and legal interpretations of the Constitutional promise of both religious freedom and the separation of church and state. We will examine the role of religion in the founding of the American republic, and in contemporary political movements such as Black Lives Matter, the Federation for Immigration Reform, 21st century civil rights organizations with concerns ranging from prison reform to the environment, and the 2016 U.S. Presidential election. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    RELG 200, POLS 236
  • AMER 221: The Presidency
    The president is the symbolic leader of the federal government but, compared to Congress, the framers of the U.S. Constitution intended the executive to be the weaker branch of the national government. This course examines the growth and accumulation of presidential power and the implications of a strong executive for domestic politics and America's foreign relations. It also considers relations between the institution of the presidency and the courts, the media, and the people.
    POLS 221
  • AMER 222: Congress
    A glance at the enumerated powers granted the legislative branch under the U.S. Constitution suggests Congress is the strongest of the three branches of the national government. Yet the power of Congress is divided between two chambers, and the vast majority of legislation proposed in either chamber never becomes law. Congress is supposed to represent the interests of the people of the various states - and yet its public standing is nowadays at an historic low. This course examines the basic operations, structure, power dynamics, and politics of the U.S. House of Representatives and the Senate. It also considers the rivalry and relationship between Congress and the President.
    POLS 222
  • AMER 223: Urban and Suburban Politics

  • AMER 224: Literature of the Vietnam War
    This course examines the Vietnam War as refracted through various literary genres. The readings for the course include Graham Greene's The Quiet American, Tim O'Brien's The Things They Carried, and Truong Nhu Tang's Vietcong Memoir. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ENGL 224, ASIA 224
  • AMER 225: Mass Media and American Politics
    An analysis of the influence of the mass media on American political institutions and American attitudes. Topics include First Amendment issues, political campaigns, political movements, public opinion, advertising, and entertainment.
    POLS 224
  • AMER 226: Chicago: Local and Global
    Chicago is a global and a 'local' city. On the one hand, the city is involved in manufacturing, trade, and services on a worldwide basis. On the other hand, Chicago is a city of neighborhoods, often based on strong ethnic and racial identities. The course examines the city's dual quality by studying the interconnections between the world economy and the daily life of Chicagoans. A key connection is immigration, which we shall explore from the standpoint of several important communities, including, most prominently, Hispanics/Latinos, as well as African-Americans, Eastern Europeans, and Asians. The course will take both an historical and contemporary approach, as we analyze how the city developed economically, politically, and culturally since the late 19th century, as well as how the city is adjusting today in an age of globalization. No prerequisites. Cross-listed in Politics and Latin American Studies, and serves as an elective for Urban Studies. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    POLS 239, LNAM 202
  • AMER 227: History of Jazz
    Principal styles of representative jazz musicians; the roots (including blues and ragtime); jazz in New Orleans and Chicago; and big band, swing, bop, and fusion. No prerequisite. (Cross-listed as American Studies 227. Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    MUSC 227, AFAM 227
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  • AMER 228: Women Writing Women
    This course will survey selected women writers, in diverse genres past and present, with a focus on American women in the 20th and 21st centuries. Writers may include: Muriel Rukeyser, Adrienne Rich, Maxine Hong Kingston, Louise Erdrich, Gloria Anzaldua, and Jamaica Kincaid, as well as women writing in recent genres like creative nonfiction, memoir, and transgender fiction. We will explore questions such as: Does the diversity of American women in terms of race, ethnicity, sexuality, and gender identification trouble the very concept of 'U.S. women writers'? What are ways that women have defined and undermined the concept of 'woman' in their writing? (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ENGL 228, GSWS 228
  • AMER 229: Historic Artifact Analysis
    (Historic Artifact Analysis: Artifacts of Modernity.) This hands-on course introduces archaeological laboratory methods and accompanying archival and research-based techniques for interpreting these "artifacts of modernity": excavated materials from ongoing archaeological projects of historic-period sites in the Chicago area. Students will be exposed to various stages of artifact processing on a collection from a recently excavated site, including: washing, sorting, identification, data entry, analysis, report preparation, and curation. Students will learn how to identify 19th- and 20th-century artifacts--American, British, French, Japanese, Chinese, and other--representing a broad range of materials from the daily lives of past peoples/past societies. The artifact analysis will allow students to develop skills useful for museum, laboratory, and/or archaeological settings. Prerequisite: SOAN 205 OR SOAN 215 OR SOAN 220 OR consent of instructor. Corequisite: This course has an additional weekly lab session (2 hrs).
    SOAN 225
  • AMER 230: African American Religions
    This course is an exploration of the rich diversity of African American religions from the colonial period to the present. Attention will be given to key figures, institutional expressions as well as significant movements in North America, the Caribbean and broader Black Atlantic. Major themes include African traditions in American religions, slavery and religion, redemptive suffering, sacred music, social protest, Black Nationalism, African American women and religion, religion in hip hop and secularity in black religious literature. Students will learn about the ways these themes have often served both as unique contributions to and critiques of America?s political establishment and social landscape. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    RELG 237, AFAM 237
  • AMER 234: Witches, Preachers, and Mystics
    In this course students consider the historical development of religion in the United States of America. We study topics such as the contact between Native Americans and European settlers, religion and the founding of the Republic, religious revivals and awakenings, immigration and religion, the rise of new forms of religion in the United States, responses to scientific and technological developments, and the entangling of religion and politics. The course covers religion from the colonial period to the dawn of the twentieth century. No prerequisites.
    RELG 234, HIST 234
  • AMER 235: Racism and Ethnic Relations
    This course surveys of the development of the theories of race and ethnic relations at the individual, group, and cultural levels. Students will examine the impact these theories have had on social policy. The course focuses on the experience of Asians, Latinos and African Americans with special attention given to institutional expressions of oppression in American Society. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    SOAN 235
  • AMER 236: 20th Cent Theater: Musical Theater
    A study of representative musical comedies, operettas, and related works that will provide topics for papers by students. Emphasis will be placed on relationship to political, social, and cultural events. Videotapes of musicals are viewed and discussed. Among works to be discussed are Show Boat, Oklahoma!, South Pacific, My Fair Lady, Hair, Jesus Christ Superstar, A Little Night Music, Sunday in the Park with George, and others.
    ENGL 236, MUSC 235
  • AMER 237: Philosophy & 1960s Popular Culture
    This course offers a demanding tour through the intellectual milieu of the 1960s in the United States. We will read philosophical works, social theory, popular and literary fiction, and occasional pieces of various sorts (speeches, journalism, etc.); we will watch films and television shows; we will listen to music: all with the goal of figuring out not just how people in the 1960s were thinking, but also of understanding how philosophy and popular culture reflected and refracted each other during a particular - and particularly volatile - historical moment.
    PHIL 235
  • AMER 240: Public History
    Public history is the practice of history outside the academy. Public historians record and preserve evidence of the past in many formats, analyzing and interpreting their findings to general and specialized audiences beyond the traditional classroom setting. This course will survey the theory and practice of various professional historical specialties - ranging from archival administration to historic site management, museum exhibitions, and historical reenactment. Institutional constraints, audience development, and conflicts between history and public memory will be major thematic issues. Field trips to institutions and sites in the Chicago metropolitan area.
    HIST 285
  • AMER 241: American Foreign Policy
    This course explores the important historical events and ideologies that have shaped American foreign policy since the founding of the Republic. We study the models of foreign policy making in the area of national security, the world economy, international law and human rights, and the global environment. Special emphasis is placed on the strategic choices facing President Obama.
    POLS 240, IREL 240
  • AMER 242: Influence and Interest Groups
    Organized interests shape American campaigns and candidates, citizen attitudes, and policy at every level of government; the power of these groups lies in their numbers, their dollars and their organization. This course introduces the intellectual traditions and debates that have characterized the study of interest groups and their influence on public policy, political opinion, and political actors, and will compare theory to practice in the American political experience.
    POLS 225
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  • AMER 249: Colonial America
    This course is an interpretive survey of American Colonial history in the context of a broad Atlantic system from 1492 to 1763. The colonial period was the first era of globalization, when peoples of Europe, Africa, and the Americas came together in new economic, social, and cultural configurations. In this class we will explore this period not only as the first chapter in American history, but more broadly as a hugely transformative era in World history. A main component of this course is attention to ordinary people in early America through research in primary sources.
    HIST 220
  • AMER 250: American Civil War
    The origins of the war in the antagonistic development of the free North and slave South; Lincoln and the Republican Party; Black activity in the North and South; the war; the transforming and gendered aspects of fighting the war; Reconstruction; the impact of the war on American development.
    HIST 226
  • AMER 251: Rhetorical History of U.S.
    A historical survey of rhetorical artifacts focusing on how interested parties use discourse to establish, maintain or revive power.
    COMM 251
  • AMER 252: Intro to Women's/Gender Studies
    (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • AMER 253: American Revolution
    To quote the historian Gordon Wood, the American Revolution 'was the most radical and far-reaching event in American history.' In this course we examine this momentous Founding Age of the United States, with a special focus on the ideas that shaped this period. We explore the growing estrangement of American colonies from Great Britain and the culmination of this process in the Declaration of Independence. Then we look at the process and controversies involved in creating a new nation, and the United States government.
    HIST 222
  • AMER 259: American Constitutional Law
    This course examines the major constitutional themes of judicial review, federalism, separation of powers, the commerce power, due process rights, and equal protection under the law. Students read U.S. Supreme Court cases in order to analyze and understand the allocation of government power. Prerequisite: POLS 120 or permission of instructor.
    POLS 261
  • AMER 260: American Political Thought
    Students survey American political thought from the Revolutionary Era to the present day (or from the original Boston Tea Party to the contemporary Tea Party movement). Topics to be covered include: revolutionary ideas and their historical antecedents, the framing of the Constitution, 19th century responses to slavery and industrialism, the Progressive Era, and the philosophical underpinnings of contemporary conservatism and liberalism. There are no prerequisites, but either POLS 120 or a previous course in political theory is encouraged.
    POLS 250
  • AMER 261: American Environmental History
    Introduction to the historical study of the relationship of Americans with the natural world. Examination of the ways that 'natural' forces helped shape American history; the ways human beings have altered and interacted with nature over time; and the ways cultural, philosophical, scientific, and political attitudes towards the environment have changed in the course of American history, pre-history to the present.
    HIST 232, ES 260
  • AMER 262: Race & Gender in American Politics
    In this course we will explore the complex relationship between race and gender in the American political process. How do underrepresented racial groups and women attain legislative success? What role does identity politics play in influencing voter decisions? We will examine how race and gender affect political behavior, public policy, American political culture, and the overall political landscape. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement.)
  • AMER 263: American Cities
    The changing functions, scale, and quality of urban society from the seventeenth century to the present. A historical framework for studying modern American metropolitan problems. Some fieldwork in Chicago.
    HIST 235, ES 263
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  • AMER 264: History of Rock and Roll
    This course covers the history of rock music from its origins in the blues and American country music to the diverse rock styles heard today. Analysis of performances and compositional styles of several familiar rock stars is included. Social and political influences will be addressed, but the focus will be on the music itself. No prerequisite.
    MUSC 264
  • AMER 265: American Jurisprudence
    (Jurisprudence: Philosophy of American Law) Students examine the ways Americans have conceptualized and theorized about the law from the time of the Founding to the present day. Topics to be covered include natural law versus legal positivism; the relationships among law, politics, economics, and society; and debates over constitutional and statutory interpretation, the proper role of judges in a democracy, and the relationship between domestic and international law. There are no prerequisites, but either POLS 120 or a previous course in political theory is encouraged.
    POLS 262
  • AMER 266: Music in Film
    Music has played an important part of the movie-going experience since the beginnings of the film industry in the 1890's, and the blending of music and drama has deeper roots still. This course charts the development of music and sound in film, from these deep roots through the mis-named silent-movie era and on to the great film composers of the twentieth century and today. Students will learn the fundamental elements of a film score, investigate how a film composer works, and develop a vocabulary for describing and assessing film music. No prior knowledge of music or film history is necessary.
    MUSC 266, CINE 266
  • AMER 267: US & World History
    This course examines US history from various perspectives to show not only that it has been both similar to and different than that of other nations, but also that it cannot be separated from world developments. Examples of perspectives to be used include the following: a comparative viewpoint that looks at key moments and developments, i.e., the abolition of slavery, as they occurred throughout the world; a transnational approach that embeds US history at every significant moment, e.g., industrialization, in its connections to ongoing global events and processes; a diasporic standpoint that puts the voluntary and forced movement of peoples at the center of the evolution of US society; a political-economic critique that places the origins and development of capitalism at the center of world history since the fourteenth century.
    HIST 237, IREL 222
  • AMER 268: The Judiciary
    This is an examination of the federal court system, focusing on the United States Supreme Court. Students will study the constitutional beginnings of the federal judicial branch and its position vis a vis the two other branches of government. We will examine the history of the United States Supreme Court, the politics of presidential appointment of judges, selected case law over the course of the Court's history and its impact, personalities on the Court and the Court's decision-making process.
    POLS 266
  • AMER 269: American Philosophy
    American philosophy has a rich and diverse history. With the sometimes conflicting commitments to principles and pragmatism as a focus, the course will investigate topics such as (1) early debates over American political institutions: human rights and democracy versus aristocratic leanings to ensure good government; (2) eighteenth-century idealism (e.g., Royce) and transcendentalism (focusing on moral principle, as reflected in Emerson and Thoreau); (3) American pragmatism in its various forms (Pierce, James, and Dewey); (4) Whitehead and process philosophy; and (5) contemporary manifestations (e.g., human rights, environmental concerns, technology, and struggles with diversity).
    PHIL 270
  • AMER 270: Hist of Educ in American Society
    (History of Education in American Society) Historical role of education in American society; education as a panacea and as a practical solution; schooling vs. education. Emphasis is on the twentieth century.
    HIST 239, EDUC 239
  • AMER 271: The New American Nation, 1787-1848
    This course covers America's 'Founding Period' from the end of the Revolution through the conclusion of the U.S.-Mexican War. During this time, Americans gradually came to see themselves as part of a unified nation with its own distinctive culture and ideals, though this outcome was far from certain. Beginning with the Constitution and the uncertain legacies of the American Revolution, the course considers the fundamental political, social, and cultural problems that could easily have torn the young Republic apart. Topics and themes include the problems of democracy and popular politics, the limits of citizenship, the formation of a distinctive American culture, the place of America on the world stage, the transition to capitalism and the 'market revolution,' and the figure of Andrew Jackson. Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Corequisites: No corequisites.
    HIST 224
  • AMER 272: Disney, Music and Culture
    Walt Disney created an empire both influencing and being influenced by society and culture since its inception. Disney films, music, propaganda, media, business practices, and merchandise have been imbedded into popular culture. Disney, Music, and Culture is an introduction to the history and content of the Disney Corporation, the films and soundtracks, and a critical look at them through the lenses of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and disability, among others. A major element of this course will involve viewing Disney films and analyzing critically based on the lenses mentioned above. The evolution of how Disney utilized music will also be examined at length. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    MUSC 267
  • AMER 273: American Music
    Music in the United States from the time of the pilgrims to the present day. The course includes art music, folk music, religious music, and jazz. Prerequisite: Any music class or consent of the instructor.
    MUSC 265
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  • AMER 274: Race and Criminal Justice
    This course will examine the systemic racial injustices inherent in American criminal jurisprudence from police interaction to trial and sentencing, incarceration, and supervised release. Students will study how racial injustice continues to pervade the American criminal justice system despite the constitutional guarantees of equal protection and due process. How do so many players, from police officers to judges and juries, fail to protect against racial injustice? Why do courts, when confronted with allegations or proof of racially motivated police misconduct, overwhelmingly cite "harmless error" doctrine? To attempt to answer these complicated questions, students will learn legal criminal procedure, study 4th, 5th, 6th and 8th amendment case law, and have an opportunity to listen to and speak with a variety of professionals in the criminal justice field. Prerequisite: POLS 120 or permission of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    POLS 270, AFAM 270
  • AMER 275: Introduction to Film Studies
    Cinema technique, production, language, style, genres, movements, and criticism, through the analysis of particularly important and representative films and directors.
    COMM 275
  • AMER 276: Inequality and Reform: US 1865-1920
    This course offers an introduction to the political, social, and cultural history of the United States between Reconstruction and World War I, as the country rebuilt and reimagined itself in the wake of the Civil War and the end of slavery. We will pay special attention to new patterns of inequality in the contexts of industrialization, urbanization, and immigration. We will also examine the complexities and contradictions of progressive reform movements, including efforts to improve housing, sanitation, and labor conditions. We will look at how those transformations affected people's everyday lives and conceptions of American citizenship, and we will explore the emergence of popular mass culture through photography, art, architecture, advertising, and films. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    HIST 228
  • AMER 291: Tutorial

  • AMER 308: Sport and Spectacle Modern America
    This course considers the history of sport as mass entertainment from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. More than an escape from everyday life, the games Americans have played and watched have been thick with social, cultural, and political meanings. Athletes and spectators alike have defined and challenged ideas of gender, race, and the body; they have worked out class antagonisms, expressed national identities, and promoted social change. Topics include: the construction of race; definitions of manhood and womanhood; industrialization, urbanization, and the rise of modern spectator sport; media and mass spectacle; fitness and athletic reform movements; collegiate athletics; sports figures and social change. Prerequisite: History 200 or 201, or permission of the instructor.
    HIST 308
  • AMER 311: Hidden Chicago
    (Hidden Chicago: Culture, Class, Conflict). This course will explore specific aspects of Chicago 'hidden' away, either deliberately or accidently, as well as those simply effaced by time. To this end, we will look at 4 specific erasures that may include: 1) Fairs: The Colombian Exposition of 1893 (U of C and Jackson Park) and the 1933 Century of Progress Exhibition (Northerly Island); 2) Utopias and religious communities: the company town of Pullman and the early history of the Nation of Islam (and possible links to the jazz musician Sun Ra); 3) Public Housing and the Black Belt: The 'ghettos in the sky' that formerly dominated South State Street, and the period of black migration; the Chicago Defender; Richard Wright's novel Native Son and 4) Popular Myths and Movements: the city before the 1871 fire, the Potawatomie fur-trading era, the 'pirate' of Streeterville, various 'vice' districts, gangland Chicago, the House Music movement, etc.

    This field course will take students out of the classroom whenever possible. Or, put another way, the city shall be our classroom. The course texts will be both literary and historical in nature.

    ENGL 311
  • AMER 312: Black Metropolis
    (Black Metropolis: A Study of Black Life in Chicago). This course is a study of race and urban life in Chicago. From the founding of Chicago by a black man to the participation of blacks in the rebuilding of the city following the Great Chicago fire, and into an exploration of Bronzeville, 'a city within a city,' this course will highlight blacks and their contributions to this great city. Study of landmark texts, documentaries, novels, and photography, along with at least one field trip to the Chicago area, will reveal the impact of the Great Migration on the city; contributions of talented musicians, writers, and photographers involved in the Chicago Renaissance; and the origins of the famous black Chicago newspaper, the Chicago Defender, including its regular column by Langston Hughes. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    AFAM 312, ENGL 312
  • AMER 315: US Catholic Immigrant Experience
    From the Irish who arrived before the Civil War to the Mexicans and Vietnamese who have come recently, the Catholic experience in the US has been a continuing story of immigration. This course examines how succeeding immigrant groups have practiced and lived their Catholic faith in different times and places. Religion cannot be separated from the larger social and economic context in which it is embedded, so the course will also pay attention to the ways in which the social and economic conditions that greeted the immigrants on their arrival shaped how they went about praying and working. Finally, the changing leadership of the Catholic Church will be taken into account, since it provided the ecclesiastical framework for the new Catholic arrivals. Prerequisite: HIST 120 or HIST 121 or permission of the instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    HIST 315, RELG 315
  • AMER 322: Campaigns, Elections & Pol Parties
    (Campaigns, Elections, and Political Parties) In this course, students examine the nomination procedures and election of political candidates, with a focus on significant historical campaigns, both congressional and presidential. We also study the role and development of political parties with a particular emphasis on emerging third parties, from a historical and contemporary perspective. The influences of interest groups, race, gender, voting behavior, and the media on our electoral process are also considered. Prerequisite: POLS 120 or the consent of instructor.
    POLS 322
  • AMER 325: Black Literature of the 60s
    (Black Literature of the 60s and its Legacy.) A study of the literature produced by major participants in the Black Arts and Civil Rights movements, along with an examination of writings after the 60s to determine the legacy of the themes of protest and social change. Authors may include Amiri Baraka, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King Jr., Haki Madhubuti, Sonia Sanchez, Assata Shakur, Eldridge Cleaver, Gil Scott-Heron, Angela Davis, Tupac Shakur, Jay Z, M.K. Asante, Jr., Common, Ice Cube, Lupe Fiasco, among others. Prerequisite: English 217 or permission of the instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)

    ENGL 325, AFAM 325
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  • AMER 328: Topics in American Politics
    (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement, depending on topic.)
  • AMER 336: African American Drama & Theater
    (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • AMER 340: History and the Moving Image
    This course explores the role of moving images (film, television, internet) in understanding history as both collective process and contested interpretation. The course will integrate a discussion of recent historical methodologies concerning moving images, with examples from a variety of forms, including historical epics, documentaries, propaganda, television series, literary adaptations, and biographies. Special emphasis will be placed upon the ambiguities of historical context, including the time of production, the period depicted, and changing audiences over time. Topics include: 'Feudal Codes of Conduct in Democratic Societies,' 'Film as Foundation Myth for Totalitarian Ideologies' and 'Situation Comedy of the 1970s as Social History.' Prerequisite: Two history courses or permission of the instructor.
    HIST 360, CINE 360
  • AMER 347: Topics in Gender and History
    A seminar that examines in depth one aspect of gender and history. Topics vary from year to year. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    HIST 364, GSWS 347
  • AMER 348: Museums and Exhibitions
    History is an academic discipline but it also has a public face. 'Public history,' through museum exhibitions, historical sites, the Internet, and other venues, is a growing career field. Students in this class will learn the communication tools necessary to produce an engaging and intellectually sound exhibit, including the techniques of oral history. The class will develop a concept, research in local archives, write label copy, and design and install an exhibit. We may use audio, video, photography, and the web to tell our story. The exhibition will be presented in the Sonnenschein Gallery or a local history museum, such as the Lake County Museum. The course will include field studies to Chicago-area history museums. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing, or permission of the instructor.
    HIST 368
  • AMER 351: John Waters and American Culture
    American film director John Waters will visit Lake Forest College as the keynote speaker for the 7th Annual Lake Forest Literary Festival during Spring 2011. His films, from early transgressive works such as Pink Flamingos (1972) through the commercial success of Hairspray (1988) and its follow-up Broadway musical, explore the American experience of trash culture through the lens of his hometown, Baltimore, MD. Students will examine the making of an American icon by interrogating Waters' engagement with contemporary popular culture, humor, and kitsch/trash culture. More broadly, this class will address how Waters' work may best be interpreted through queer theory, a perspective that examines the dualities of identity and performance, the natural, neutral and social constructions of gender, and how normative standards of sexuality and gender change over time.
    COMM 350, WOMN 350
  • AMER 352: The American West
    History of the American West as both frontier and region, real and imagined, from the first contacts between natives and colonizers to the multicultural communities of the late-twentieth century. Examining both history and myth, we consider the legacy of Western expansion and evaluate Frederick Jackson Turner's famous argument that the West fundamentally shaped American history. Prerequisite: History 200 or 201 or permission of the instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement.)
    HIST 310
  • AMER 355: American Social History
    Conducted as a seminar. Topics include family, class, gender, race, ethnicity, and work. Prerequisite: History 120 or 121, or permission of the instructor.
    HIST 312
  • AMER 357: American Cultural History
    This course introduces the craft and method of cultural history. Although it begins with the story of a cat massacre in eighteenth-century France, the course focuses on American art, literature, music, advertisements, and other forms of popular culture from the eighteenth century to the present. Students will use these types of evidence to understand how Americans made sense of events and transformations in the world around them. Topics will include eighteenth-century architecture, the illicit press of nineteenth-century New York, the showmanship of P.T. Barnum, early photography, the figure of the self-made man, blackface minstrelsy, early Wild West shows, 1920s advertising, and World War II pinups. All these examples will offer models for reading and interpreting cultural forms for historical meanings of gender, race, and identity. Students will work with the instructor to choose research topics for a seminar project of their own. Prerequisites: History 200 or 201, or permission of the instructor.
    HIST 314
  • AMER 358: Amer Environmnt in Great Depression
    (American Environment During the Great Depression). This course explores the many ways Americans understood and shaped their diverse local environments during the crisis of the Great Depression. Although the Dust Bowl is perhaps the most iconic of these environmental upheavals during the 1930s, this course examines diverse geographical regions: from the Appalachian mountains to the (de)forested Upper Midwest, from the agricultural South to the Dust Bowl plains and the water-starved West. In each region, we use interdisciplinary approaches (including literary, historical, sociological, and visual media studies methods) to trace the impacts of economic turmoil on the environment and the people who depended on it for their livelihoods, as well as the way economic disaster paved the way for the government's unprecedented intervention in environmental matters.This course fosters critical examination of American subcultures during the Great Depression, including African-Americans, the Southern poor, the Range culture of the American West, and the immigrant experience. Prerequisite: Any 200-level ES course or permission of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ES 358
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  • AMER 360: The First Amendment
    In this course students explore the U.S. Supreme Court's interpretation of freedoms of speech (including obscenity and libel), assembly and association, the press, and the exercise and establishment of religion. We will also examine First Amendment issues raised by regulation of the Internet and other new media. Prerequisite: POLS 120 or consent of instructor. Not open to First-Year Students.
    POLS 361
  • AMER 361: Civil Rights Movement
    This course focuses on the origins, development, and accomplishments of the civil rights movement in post-World War II America. Particular emphasis will be given to the differences between the struggle for black equality in the south and its northern counterpart. Taught in a seminar format, the class will be both reading- and writing-intensive. Course readings and paper assignments are designed to help students develop a comparative analytical framework and to illuminate the following lines of inquiry: What caused and what sustained the civil rights movement? What changes took place within the movement over time, particularly at the level of leadership? What underlay the radicalization of the movement and what were the consequences? To what extent did the civil rights movement succeed and how do we measure that success today? Finally, how did the black civil rights movement inspire other groups and minorities in American society to organize? Prerequisite: History 200 or History 201. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    HIST 306, AFAM 361
  • AMER 362: Love in a Time of Capitalism
    Most of us are familiar with the idea that romantic love plays a different role in the contemporary world than it did at other times and the idea that love manifests in different ways across cultures. Rather than attempt a survey of all the possible manifestations of romantic love, this course aims to explore how 'love' features into our understandings of human interaction in the 21st century, particularly in the United States. We will be particularly focusing on the contemporary American notion that love and money are opposing forces. Our first goal will be to identify at least some of the tropes of love that are in current circulation. We will then explore the potential social consequences of those tropes, including the ways in which such tropes are passed on and reproduced across generations and the possibility of commodifying and 'selling' certain tropes as the 'right' way to be in love. Throughout the course, we will collect love stories, and our final task of the semester will be to compare our theoretical and media derived understandings of romantic love to its manifestations in people's lives. Prerequisites: SOAN 110 and 220 or consent of instructor.
    SOAN 362, GSWS 362
  • AMER 364: The Fourteenth Amendment
    (The Fourteenth Amendment: Civil Rights and Equality) Students in this course examine the rulings of the United States Supreme Court in order to learn how the Fourteenth Amendment guides the government's treatment of people based on race, creed, national origin, gender, economic status and sexual orientation. State action, strict scrutiny analysis, affirmative action and voting rights are also covered. Prerequisite: POLS 120 or consent of instructor. Not open to First-Year Students. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    POLS 363
  • AMER 365: American Thought

  • AMER 366: Civil Liberties
    This course focuses on our individual liberties as addressed in the Bill of Rights and the Fourteenth Amendment. Using United States Supreme Court cases, we examine the protection of our individual liberties - the meaning of equal protection and the antidiscrimination principle, expressive freedom and the First Amendment, religious liberty and church-state relations, rights of personal autonomy and privacy, criminal justice, voting rights, property rights and economic freedom. Prerequisite: POLS 120 or permission of instructor. Second year standing is also required.
    POLS 365
  • AMER 367: Apocalypse in PostWWII Amer Envrnmt
    (Apocalypse and Fear in the Post-WWII American Environment.) One dominant strain of the post-World War II American environmental imagination has been fear of imminent environmental apocalypse, which manifests itself on a spectrum from diffuse anxiety to paralyzing terror. This course explores this culture of fear through a variety of topics in postwar American environmental consciousness, including the specter of atomic annihilation, the anti-eco-toxics and environmental justice movements, food security, and climate change. Texts and methodological approaches are literary, historical, anthropological, and sociological. Prerequisite: Any 200-level ES or Hist course.
    ES 363
  • AMER 384: The Rhetorical Presidency
    Examines the rhetorical nature of the office of the President of the United States.
    COMM 384
  • AMER 386: Read Popular Culture:TV Criticism
    Focusing on how culturally we are both producers and products of our popular culture we will try to answer the question: 'are we, as a culture, using the potential of television wisely'?
    COMM 386
  • AMER 390: Internship

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  • AMER 393: Research Project

  • AMER 440: Advanced Writing Seminar
    An advanced course in which each student completes a Senior Writing Project (a portfolio of work in poetry, fiction, drama, or nonfiction prose), while interacting with Chicago in two distinct ways: 1) students will generate writing from the study of specific Chicago neighborhoods, and, 2) students will participate in the literary life of the city through attending and staging literary events. Group discussion and individual conferences. Intended for senior majors in the English major-writing track. Prerequisites: (a) English 235; and (b) any 300-level writing course (English 330, 332, 360, 361, 363, or 364), or English 242/Theater 270. (Meets GEC Senior Studies Requirement.)
  • AMER 478: The 21st Century World (Dis)Order
    The international system of states is undergoing a power shift. Though it will remain the dominant world power for some time to come, most scholars agree that American global preeminence is waning. Yet scholars disagree about the effect of this shift on world order. Some see an effort by the United States and its closest allies to prop-up the current American liberal world order of global economic integration and cooperative security. Others envision either a 'post-American' world in which the United States and rising great powers re-negotiate the ground rules of a new liberal order, or a world in which the United States is one of a small number of great powers competing for power and influence in an illiberal world. Each of these possibilities raises compelling questions about war and peace, and cooperation and discord in twenty-first century international politics. Will this power shift jeopardize the liberal world order? Can this world order persist in the absence of American preeminence? How might the United States and its allies extend the current American world order?
    IREL 480
  • AMER 479: Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy

  • AMER 480: Senior Seminar
    Spring 2017 Topic: The Grateful Dead and American Culture. More than fifty years after the band's founding, the Grateful Dead looms larger than ever. From Haight-Ashbury acid-testers to visionary entrepreneurs, the band that grew up and out of the revolutions of the tumultuous 1960s found a way to mix everything from roots music to free jazz to rock into an "endless tour" that put them in the Fortune 500. The Grateful Dead provided a cultural soundtrack for not only the 1960s, but also the paranoia of the Watergate years, the Reagan-soaked 1980s, and on to the jam-band present. This course will focus on the band?s performance of authentic "Americanness" throughout its half century run. We'll listen to their music, and also to their fans, enthusiasts, and scholars. We'll understand the various subcultures that separate the sixties and now, and in doing so, offer answers to this key question: Why do the Dead survive? (Elective for English, Theater, and Music)
    AMER 200
  • AMER 490: Internship

  • AMER 491: Tutorial

  • AMER 493: Research Project

  • AMER 494: Senior Thesis

 

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  • ARBC 110: Beginning Arabic I
    Students will learn to read, write and understand Modern Standard Literary Arabic, and to use the language in basic conversation, including exchanging courtesies, meeting people, asking questions and providing information. No prerequisite.
    ISLM 110
  • ARBC 112: Beginning Arabic II
    Students will continue to learn to read, write and speak basic Modern Standard Literary Arabic in a variety of cultural situations. Prerequisite: ARBC 110 or equivalent.
    ISLM 112
  • ARBC 210: Intermediate Arabic
    Students will advance their knowledge of reading, writing and speaking basic Modern Literary Arabic as well as their understanding of the use of language in cultural context. Prerequisite: ARBC 112 or equivalent.
  • ARBC 212: Advanced Intermediate Arabic
    Students will continue to advance their knowledge of reading, writing and speaking basic Modern Literary Arabic as well as their understanding of the use of language in cultural context. Prerequisite: ARBC 210 or equivalent.

 

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  • ART 130: Elements of Design
    Introduction to basic design problems in various two- and three-dimensional techniques and media. A prerequisite for most other courses in studio art.
  • ART 131: Studio Art: Drawing
    This introductory course exposes the student to a variety of drawing tools and techniques. The emphasis is on the development of observational skill and on hand-eye coordination. Students learn the basics of value, line, and composition. The stress is on the development of a visual vocabulary and critical skills to express ideas in extended drawings. While focusing on hand/eye coordination and observational skills, the conceptual aspect of the subject matter centers, in large part, on our place in Nature: the plant/human connection, and the human/animal connection. All drawing will be created through observation of the real three-dimensional world; including plants, animals and animal/human skeletons. Emphasis will be on developing a drawing using preliminary studies and compositional ideas. Students will participate in group critiques, and will be exposed to ideas and techniques (historical and contemporary) through slide lectures.
  • ART 133: 3-D Design Foundations
    This course offers students an introduction to three dimensional art and design materials and methods. Inspired by Bauhaus course topics, the curriculum approaches additive and subtractive processes in material and conceptual explorations of form. Students will make studio projects and study important texts in 3D design and sculpture theory in building a vocabulary to deal with spatial design issues including figuration, abstraction, structure, surface, form and function. No prerequisites.
  • ART 142: Digital Design Foundations
    Digital Foundations uses formal exercises of the Bauhaus to teach the Adobe Creative Suite. The curriculum decodes digital tools and culture while explaining fundamental visual design principles within a historical context. Students develop an understanding of the basic principles of design in order to implement them using current software. There are no prerequisites for this course.
  • ART 202: Greece in the Bronze Age
    On-site study of Minoan and Mycenean cultures, with travel to sites such as Agamemnon's citadel at Myceanae and Minos's palace at Knossos. The course extends roughly from mid-March through early April. See Program in Greece under Undergraduate Curriculum for further information. Offered only in Greece and Turkey. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    GKCV 202, CLAS 202, SOAN 204
  • ART 203: Greece in Classical-Roman Ages
    On-site exploration of Greek Civilization, examining its foundations in the Archaic Age, its height during the Classical Age and its transformation during the Hellenistic Age and finally the emergence of Roman influence on Greek cities. The course extends roughly from mid-April to mid-May and includes travel to sites such as Apollo's oracle at Delphi, the sacred island of Delos, and Greek cities along the Aegean coast of Turkey. See Program in Greece under Undergraduate Curriculum for more information. Offered only in Greece and Turkey. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    GKCV 203, CLAS 203, SOAN 203
  • ART 204: Greece in Byzantine-Medieval Ages
    On-site study of the Byzantine Era in the Greek world. The course extends roughly from mid-May to early June, with travel to sites such as Ephesus, the Byzantine cities of Mistra and Monemvasia, and the monasteries of Meteora. See Program in Greece under Undergraduate Curriculum for more information. Offered only in Greece and Turkey. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    GKCV 204, CLAS 204, SOAN 204
  • ART 230: Painting
    This course is designed for the beginning student in oil painting. The emphasis in this course is on the description and analysis of the world around us. Students will learn the basics of color theory, color mixing, how to prepare and stretch a canvas, how to use and mix paint, and different techniques for various effects using brushes, rags, and palette knives. Emphasis will be on value and depth and their relationship to color. Students must have experience in drawing with value. Students will participate in group critiques and will be exposed to ideas and techniques through slide lectures. Prerequisite: Art 131.
  • ART 231: Figure Drawing
    This course is designed to give advanced students an opportunity to develop their ability to draw and interpret the human form. Working from the model, students will explore a variety of techniques including gesture drawing, studies of volume and mass, and contour and cross-contour drawing. Prerequisite: Art 131.
  • ART 232: Photography
    Intended for majors and students with background in design, this course introduces the aesthetics and techniques specific to photography, including fundamentals of camera and darkroom procedure and the study of the expressive possibilities of the medium. Prerequisite: ART 130.
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  • ART 233: Sculpture
    This course will familiarize students with the basic language and art-historical background of sculpture as both a narrative medium and a contemplative objectification of some of humankind's deepest desires. Reading key texts in the theory and history of modern and contemporary sculpture along with the creation of sketches, models and 3-dimensional artworks students will explore how sculpture functions in various contexts to convey meaning and to pose questions of reality and perception, identity, originality, psychology, society and space. Prerequisite: ART 130 or ART 133.
  • ART 234: Landscape Painting
    An outdoor, landscape/nature course involving the student in the observation of nature, transcribed through perceptual data, and resulting in painting and drawing.
  • ART 235: Illustrating Children's Books
    This course introduces students to the children's picture book as a genre and to an analysis of its structure. The course exposes students to a variety of fairy tales and cultures. From these multiple stories, students select a single fairy tale and focus on the plot, characters, and storyline. Working with a variety of research tools, students will develop their own drawings to create the final tale. The culmination of this project will be a handmade book, which will also have a digital component. Class critiques are held throughout the course.
  • ART 236: Ceramics
    This course offers an introduction to ceramic art, including wheel-work, hand-building, and glazing, on a college level. In addition to developing practical skills in ceramics, students will explore the history of the medium and the relationship of concept to visual form. Because this course is sited near the campus, students scheduling their courses must allow time between classes for transport. Cost of materials is not included in tuition; it will be billed upon enrollment and is not refundable.
  • ART 237: Performance Art
    This course will provide students with an understanding of performance art as a constantly evolving and flexible medium. The class will trace the emergence and development of performance art as a form of expression both distinct from and yet dependent upon traditional and experimental forms of theater and other contemporary manifestations of theatricality. Students will negotiate, through reading, research, discussion and planning and practical application, the blurred boundaries between performing and living, entertainment and art.
    THTR 224, ENGL 233
  • ART 244: Digital Art
    This class explores digital media through the eyes of contemporary art. Exposure to contemporary work in two-dimensional digital media, contemporary art theory and criticism will assist the students to develop their own artistic voice in the context of ongoing contemporary conversations in art. Students explore complex image manipulation and generation options and refine technical skills in preparation for advanced artwork. Projects are designed to combine student's conceptual abilities with technical expertise. Emphasis is on integration of digital images, scanned images and drawing into high-resolution images for output and use in large-scale projects, image-sequencing possibilities, and integration of multi-media installations. Prerequisite: ART 142.
  • ART 250: Printmaking
    This studio course introduces students to a range of printmaking techniques. Students will generate several quality editions of printed artwork on paper and fabric as they explore the potential of printmaking processes to approach important topics in art and design. Prerequisite: ART 130 OR ART 131.
  • ART 252: Bookbinding for Artists and Authors
    This course will provide a practical introduction to a variety of bookbinding techniques, from Japanese and pamphlet bindings to hard-cover case binding, in addition to portfolio and presentation box construction. Students will produce both unique books and small-run multiples of original literary and/or visual work, according to their curricular focus. Special emphasis will be placed on how the poetry, prose, drawings and prints students produce for this course can best be presented in the format of their handmade books. Prerequisites: No prerequisites Corequisites: No corequisites
    ENGL 252
  • ART 253: Graphic Design
    Graphic Design focuses on developing graphic communication skills through a series of exercises and assignments that help students to successfully integrate image and text with an emphasis on commercial design practices. Students will explore visual design concepts, and use the communicative power of design elements in order to create effective solutions to real-world visual problems. Students learn the principles and techniques of publication design and photo editing techniques, using Mac platforms with Adobe InDesign, Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator. Emphasis is on topics related to commercial graphics, advertising and publications. Topics include: letter design and typeface, layout, logo and letterhead, computer-generated images, illustration, and print media techniques. Prerequisites: Art 130 and either Art 142 or Art 242.
  • ART 261: Art of Social Change
    Artists have a long history as agents of social change, using "traditional" art forms such as painting, drawing, printmaking and sculpture, and a bit more recently photography, performance and video to critique various aspects of society and to propose alternatives for the future. The consideration of social engagement as an artistic medium in and of itself has become an important current in contemporary art since at least the 1990s. This course will begin with a consideration of some of the ways artists in the past approached social and political concerns. We will then focus on the more recent proliferation of artists with social practices both within and outside of the gallery/museum realm of contemporary art. Students will address various important historical, theoretical and practical texts; conduct discussions and presentations; and collaborate to design and enact original works of socially engaged art. No prerequisites.
    ETHC 261
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  • ART 277: Web Design and Development
    In a project and laboratory-based format, this course focuses on the intersecting skills sets and theoretical knowledge of the graphic artist and Web programmer. Core concepts covered include Web site conceptualization, design conventions and usability considerations, constructing graphical mockups, progressing to XHTML/CSS integration and template construction. Additional topics include Web standards and validation, open source content management systems, dynamically server generated pages, and data collection with XHTML forms. Students will gain proficiency with software such as Adobe's Illustrator and Dreamweaver. A computer laboratory fee will be assessed for this course. Pre-requisites: CSCI 107 and Art 142.
    CSCI 277
  • ART 285: Creative Arts Entrepreneurship
    Creative Arts Entrepreneurship will offer an overview of the processes, practices, and decision-making activities that lead to the realization of our creative ideas. Students from across the humanities, arts, sciences, and business will learn the unique contexts and challenges of creative careers, with an emphasis on collaborative projects. The course will help students understand the nature and structure of arts enterprise while cultivating their own career vision and creative goals. Creative Arts Entrepreneurship is designed for students interested in developing, launching, or advancing innovative enterprises in arts, culture, and design, and those who love the initiative, ingenuity and excitement of putting creative ideas into action. The course combines readings and in-class discussions with site visits, case studies, guest lectures by working artists and creative professionals, and student-driven projects. No prerequisites.
    MUSC 285, ENTP 285, ENGL 285, THTR 285
  • ART 320: Landscape and Representation
    This course explores the many moments in human history when landscape is a subject for representation. Drawing from a wide range of chronological periods and cultures, the course will examine how the natural environment is depicted, for which audiences it is depicted, the artistic strategies by which landscapes are achieved, and the many meanings and associations that accompany the production of landscape imagery.
  • ART 330: Advanced Painting
    Advanced work in painted media. Prerequisite: Art 230.
  • ART 331: Advanced Drawing
    Advanced drawing is designed for the student with previous studio drawing background. The course will explore abstraction and non-objective drawing techniques and ideas. Students will, working from known sources, develop abstract imagery and explore new and varied media and materials. Non-objective compositions will be stressed in the later half of the semester. Color will also be an integral aspect of the drawing process. Slides, lectures and field trips will be included in the course work. Prerequisite: Art 131.
  • ART 332: Advanced Photography
    Advanced work with camera and darkroom.
  • ART 333: Advanced Sculpture
    This course approaches contemporary ideas in sculpture with challenging individual and collaborative studio projects, pertinent reading and writing assignments addressing sculptural practices and forms, and virtual methods of sculptural hypothesis. Topics addressed include the relationship between form and function, the importance of process and materiality, developing a conceptual framework, and the context of presentation in conveying meaning. As a 300-level studio course, students are expected to produce work of sophisticated conceptual and formal quality, and to develop a sense of their own artistic style working in 3 (and 4) dimensions. Written project statements will be important components of the presentation of all studio assignments. Critiques will be rigorous and honest, with the paramount goal of improving the effectiveness of each student's artwork as well as their mechanisms of presentation. Prerequisite: Art 233 OR Art 130 and Art 133.
  • ART 334: Installation Art
    In this course students will integrate a variety of artistic media and processes to negotiate the transformation of specific spaces. Students will work both collaboratively and independently on creative projects with the goal of better understanding the contextual importance of site and the potential meanings of materials. Attention will be paid to engaging audiences in both art-dedicated and non-art spaces, and to sustainable and practical materials and construction plans. Prerequisites: Art 130, or Art 131, or Art 133; AND Art 230, or Art 231, or Art 233, or Art 234, or Art 236, or Art 237, or Art 244, or Art 250, or Art 330, or Art 331, or Art 333, or Art 335, or Art 342, or Art 343. Art 233 recommended.
  • ART 335: Mixed Media:Materials & Tech
    This class will focus on the interaction of various media and their application in both two and three dimensions. The class will emphasize a variety of materials and techniques; students will use collage and various other techniques such as monoprinting, transfer techniques, and work with found objects. Emphasis will be on unorthodox methods. Students will work with a variety of materials while developing ideas and exploring visual methods to create formally and conceptually coherent works of art. Critiques and slide lectures will be included. Prerequisite: Art 131.
  • ART 342: Advanced Computer Imaging
    This course explores the computer as a tool to enhance the image-making process. While Art 341 focuses on issues of construction and representation in two-dimensional image manipulation, this course will allow students who are interested in a wide range of media to learn new approaches to art-making using time-based media. Utilizing applications such as Dreamweaver and Final Cut Pro, the class will consider the ways artists can manipulate images and craft projects in video and web formats. Students will design and produce videos that will be burned onto tape or DVD as well as active Web sites. Prerequisite: Art 142 and one other studio art course.
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  • ART 343: Video Art
    This course combines digital video production techniques with a seminar-style investigation into the use of film and video as an art form. Students will use Final Cut Studio software in a Mac-platform computer lab to produce several independent and collaborative creative video projects addressing ideas crucial to the development of video art, and pertinent to our current connections to technology and life, communication and entertainment. Students will become familiar with common themes, tools and techniques utilized in this changing, but nonetheless historically grounded medium as they find their own creative voices and engage the rapidly growing community of digital video producers and consumers. Prerequisite: ART 130 or ART 142 or both COMM 112 and COMM 275.
    CINE 343
  • ART 344: Digital Color Photography
    Digital Color Photography will explore the use of digital and analog cameras to create color photographs that will range from small and medium to large scale format (9" x 12" through 24" x 36"). Working in response to specific challenges from photographic history, as well as contemporary color photographic work, students will use the basic elements of the camera - the lens, the shutter and the aperture - as well as the inventive use of artificial and natural lighting, setting and backdrop, to create images that will be processed through the digital environment of the computer lab rather than in the darkroom. Processing of images will include learning to control scale, color and file size while moving from digital image to printed document. Students will be exposed to the unique expressive qualities of the color image while exploring the conceptual possibilities of this versatile medium in collaborative as well as individual projects, realizing specific ideas in concrete visual form. Prerequisite: Art 142.
  • ART 350: Advanced Printmaking
    In this course students produce professional quality editions of printed artwork. Students work closely with faculty to propose and execute advanced projects in relief printing, intaglio, serigraphy or other related media, culminating in an exhibition or publication. Prerequisite: Art 250.
  • ART 370: Interactive Web Design
    This course integrates art and design fundamentals into a web-based, interactive format. It includes review of design fundamentals for the web and an introduction to the history of animation and interactive design. The course will also cover web design conventions and considerations including color and typography for the web, grid design and wire-framing. The course will provide detailed coverage of creating HTML and CSS -based web sites using Adobe Dreamweaver. Animation fundamentals using Adobe Flash and advanced interactive techniques using Adobe Flash will also be covered. Prerequisites: Art 142, CSCI 107 and CSCI 270.
  • ART 480: Senior Seminar in Studio Art
    The aim of this course is to provide a 'capstone' experience for students majoring in studio art. The course allows students to reflect on why one makes art and to develop their own conceptual basis for making art. The course will stress issues that confront the studio artist, including professional practices. Students will divide their time between off-campus visits to Chicago-area museums, galleries, and artists' studios and the classroom. Classroom work will focus on readings and discussions of art practices and issues confronting the contemporary artist as well as on making connections between visits to sites in Chicago and the readings. Students will devise artwork that reflects some of these concerns. Prerequisite: senior standing in the major or permission of the instructor.
  • ART 481: Senior Seminar in Studio Art
    The aim of this course is to provide a 'capstone' experience for students majoring in studio art. The course allows students to reflect on why one makes art and to develop their own conceptual basis for making art. The course will stress issues that confront the studio artist, including professional practices. Students will divide their time between off-campus visits to Chicago-area museums, galleries, and artists' studios and the classroom. Classroom work will focus on readings and discussions of art practices and issues confronting the contemporary artist as well as on making connections between visits to sites in Chicago and the readings. Students will devise artwork that reflects some of these concerns.
  • ART 490: Internship

  • ART 492: Creative Project
    A well-documented and well-executed visual project completed in the senior year may count as a senior thesis. (See Academic Regulations in the Student Handbook for details.) As with other theses, the final project will be reviewed by a thesis-examining committee consisting of three faculty, at least one from outside the Art Department. Students are encouraged to consult with members of this committee during the planning and execution of the project.
  • ART 494: Senior Thesis

 

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  • ARTH 110: Introduction to Visual Arts
    This course introduces students to the subjects of art history and the questions and methods used in the discipline; the course considers basic issues, such as how one sees and interprets a work of art, but also explores how art is defined and how it works in culture. A principal aim of the course is to give students the opportunity to analyze and write about works of art. This is the recommended first course in art history and is required of majors.
  • ARTH 205: Japanese Art and Culture
    The course focuses on the history of Japanese art from neolithic to modern times, with emphasis on the art forms of the major periods and their relationship to social, political, and religious developments. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ASIA 205
  • ARTH 206: Chinese Art and Culture
    This course examines the history of Chinese art from the Bronze Age to the present with emphasis on the major art forms and their relationship to contemporary social, political, and religious development. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ASIA 206
  • ARTH 210: Ancient Art
    Painting, sculpture, and architecture of ancient civilizations of Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece, and Rome.
  • ARTH 211: Medieval Art
    A survey of European art from the era of Constantine (ca. 400) through the Gothic period, about 1300.
  • ARTH 212: Italian Renaissance Art
    An introduction to Italian art from the late Gothic period until the Reformation, ca. 1300 to 1600.
  • ARTH 215: Baroque & Rococo
    An introduction to European art during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.
  • ARTH 217: Nineteenth Century Art
    Introduction to art and architecture in Europe and America from the neoclassicism associated with the French and American revolutions to the Impressionist and Post-Impressionist avant-gardes. Course readings emphasize the relationship of art to other social movements. Students tie classroom study to the collections of area museums.
  • ARTH 218: Twentieth Century Art
    Introduction to European and American art from Post-Impressionism to Postmodernism. Course readings reveal competing constructions of this history that is still in the making. Students tie classroom study to the collections of area museums.
  • ARTH 219: American Art
    The visual arts in North America, covering painting, sculpture, architecture, and the applied domestic arts, from the Colonial period to the present.
    AMER 219
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  • ARTH 220: History of Architecture
    Evolution of architectural style and thought from antiquity to the present.
  • ARTH 221: Modern Architecture
    This class examines the history of architecture from the late nineteenth century to the late twentieth century. Students will be introduced to architectural terminology and techniques for analyzing architecture. They will also study the major trends in architectural design in the twentieth century, the issues faced by architects, and the social and functional problems that architecture is designed to solve.
  • ARTH 222: History of Photography
    This course examines the history of photography from its invention in 1839 to the late 20th century. Students will be introduced to terminology and techniques specific to the photographic medium. This course will discuss photographic conventions and customs, and the extent to which they reflect and construct societal institutions (particularly in the United States). Students will also study the special properties of photography as icon, index and symbol, and become conversant in the semiotics of the image. No prerequisites; previous experience in ArtH 110: Introduction to Visual Arts will be helpful.
  • ARTH 223: Northern Renaissance Art
    Arts of the Netherlands, France, Germany, and Spain from ca. 1350 to ca. 1550.
  • ARTH 224: History of Prints
    The graphic arts of the Western tradition, from about 1400 to the twentieth century.
  • ARTH 225: American Architecture
    The course will survey American architecture from the seventeenth century to the present. Topics will include early colonial architecture, architecture of the new republic, nineteenth century eclecticism and domestic revival, the Chicago School and the skyscraper style, and the development of modern architecture in the twentieth century. Other themes to be discussed include changes in domestic demographic and population patterns, post-war housing, issues in American historic preservation and new urbanism.
  • ARTH 226: Colonial Latin American Art
    This course will consider the arts of Central and South America from the conquest to independence (ca. 1500-1850) and will explore the intersections among art, culture, and power in the specific conditions of Colonial Latin America. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement).
    LNAM 226
  • ARTH 238: Curating an Art Collection
    This course explores the curatorial function of the Sonnenschein Gallery of Lake Forest College. Using the study of the history and theory of art galleries/museums as a foundation, this class will use the College's own extensive and eclectic art collection to get practical experience in the study, identification and arrangement of the art collection. The culmination of the class will be to plan and install an art exhibition in the Sonnenschein Gallery using collection components. Prerequisite: ARTH 110
  • ARTH 239: Museum Histories and Practices
    This course will provide an introduction to the rise and functions of museums in Western and global cultures. Among the issues to be considered are: collectors, collecting and display; the history of the Western museum from the Enlightenment to the contemporary era; types and functions of museums from art museums to zoos; spaces and architecture for displaying artifacts and collections; strategies of display and curating; systems and practices among museums; the spread of the "museum idea" across the globe. No prerequisites.
  • ARTH 280: Architecture in East Asia
    This course explores a diverse body of architecture in China and Japan from ancient to contemporary times. We will investigate the major architectural types in traditional East Asia - including cities, temples, palaces, gardens, and houses - as well as individual monuments like Japan's Himeji Castle and the 'Bird's Nest' Olympic stadium in Beijing. In addition to examining the architectural history of these sites, we will discuss thematic issues related to design, space, landscape, ritual, memory, and modernity. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ASIA 280
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  • ARTH 282: Depicting Difference in Western Art
    (Depicting Difference: Images of the Racial and Religious 'Other' in Western Art.) This course will examine how Western cultures visually depicted those they considered different from themselves?those they considered to be 'Other.' We shall investigate European traditions of depicting difference, beginning with Classical Greece and Rome's conceptions of the monstrous races and continuing through to contemporary artistic challenges to stereotypical representations of otherness. While our explorations will range from the Ancient to the Modern world, our course will be particularly focused on the role visual imagery of the 'Other' played in supporting colonialism and Western discourses of cultural superiority in the fifteenth through nineteenth centuries. As this course is focused on how Western cultures depicted those of different racial, religious and cultural backgrounds, it will undoubtedly foster critical analysis and understanding of different races, religions and cultures. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ISLM 282
  • ARTH 286: Topics in Islamic Art
    This course examines the visual arts of early and medieval Islam from the seventh through the thirteenth centuries in Muslim territories, ranging from Central Asia to Spain. Through an examination of diverse media, we shall explore the role of visual arts played in the formation and expression of Islamic cultural identity. Topics will include the uses of figural and non-figural imagery, religious and secular art, public and private art and the status, function, and meaning of the portable luxury objects. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ISLM 286, RELG 286
  • ARTH 306: Buddhist Arts of Asia
    In the early centuries CE, Buddhism spread eastward from its origins in India to China, Korea, and Japan. It brought with it a rich religious tradition that altered forever the visual arts of these regions. Students in this course will explore the painting, sculpture, and monuments of the East Asian Buddhist world from ancient times to the twentieth century, paying particular attention to issues of patronage, ritual, iconography, symbolism, and style in order to better understand the complex relationships between religion and art. No pre-requisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ASIA 306
  • ARTH 320: Landscape and Representation
    This course explores the many moments in human history when landscape is a subject for representation. Drawing from a wide range of chronological periods and cultures, the course will examine how the natural environment is depicted, for which audiences it is depicted, the artistic strategies by which landscapes are achieved, and the many meanings and associations that accompany the production of landscape imagery.
  • ARTH 322: Sight, Site & Insight
    This course will explore the concept of the natural in the history of art and in contemporary art making. Students in the course will look at a variety of sites and analyze both verbal and visual responses to them. Topics will include landscape painting, earth art, urban design, landscape architecture, Native American land use, and many other issues having to do with landscape and human interactions with nature. The class will combine art making with evaluating texts and writing about the natural world. Short field trips to local sites and a long field trip over mid-semester break to the Southwest required.
    ART 322
  • ARTH 323: Monuments and Memory
    This course explores the cultural function of monuments and other images dedicated to memory. We shall consider the definition of a monument and the social behavior of remembrance. Topics will include the commemoration of public triumph, defeat, trauma, private memory, funerary architecture, photography, and mourning. Prerequisite: one art history course.
  • ARTH 325: Women, Art and Society
    This course considers the contributions of women artists to the Western tradition of art making and examines the way art in the Western world has used the figure of woman to carry meaning and express notions of femininity in different periods. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    GSWS 325
  • ARTH 326: Gender Identity in Modern Art
    Since the late nineteenth century, communities of artists and critics have defined themselves in opposition to the dominant forms of maleness and heterosexuality. This course examines the definitions of 'homosexuality' and 'feminism,' and traces their development in and influence on the visual arts. Prerequisite: one art history course. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    GSWS 326
  • ARTH 338: Museum/Gallery Practicum
    This course combines study of the history and theory of art exhibition with field trips to Chicago-area museums and galleries, and culminates with the practical experience of planning and installing an exhibition in the Sonnenschein Gallery. Prerequisite: ArtH 110.
  • ARTH 355: The Art of the Sixties
    Students in this class will examine the many and varied practices of art making in the 1960s, a decade characterized by national and global ideological change, the explosion of counterculture and the retirement of older notions of what qualifies as 'art.' Yet, so as not to study this decade in a vacuum, close attention will be paid to the artistic practices preceding the 1960s in order to more fully understand the iconoclasms that would follow. Pre-requisite: At least one art history class or consent of instructor.
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  • ARTH 360: Contemporary Art
    Focuses on the art of the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, from about 1970 until the present day, to trace the development of contemporary artistic movements and expression. Prerequisite: ARTH 110, or another college-level art history course.
  • ARTH 380: Renaissance Art and Domesticity
    This course examines the original setting of works of art in the secular context of the household during the Renaissance (about 1300-1650). It will also consider representations of the domestic sphere as evidence for the functions of objects in houses, palaces, or villas. Addressing issues of patronage, function and audience, the course explores the uses men and women in the Renaissance made of works of art in their homes. Among the art forms we will analyze are: domestic architecture, paintings (frescoes, portraits, cassone, spalliere), sculpture, furnishings, metalwork, ceramics, tapestries and other textiles. Prerequisite: at least one art history course or consent of the instructor.
    GSWS 380
  • ARTH 383: Hell, Damnation and Romanesque Art
    This seminar will explore the fascinating?and often terrifying?artistic production of the Romanesque period (c. 1000-1200 CE) in Medieval Europe. Although often characterized as part of the 'Dark Ages,' this period is actually one of unprecedented artistic and cultural activity, worthy of in-depth exploration. Taking a thematic approach, this seminar will place Romanesque art within its broader cultural, political and religious contexts. Topics will include: The Cult of Saints; Monasticism; Popes and Kings; Knights and Castles; Crusader Art; and Misogyny and Depictions of Women. Prerequisite: one art history course.
  • ARTH 485: Sem: Means & Meth of Art Historians
    (Seminar: Means and Methods of Art Historians). In-depth consideration of special issues, fields, or topics with careful attention given to questions of methods of investigation and the reporting of research. An exploration of some of the principal methods used by art historians in their investigations of the visual arts including historiography, style and connoisseurship, iconography and iconology, social history, and other means of interpretation. Prerequisite: senior standing in the major or permission of the instructor.
  • ARTH 490: Internship

  • ARTH 494: Senior Thesis

 

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  • ASIA 107: Developing World Thirst for Energy
    This course will introduce the concepts behind the ever-increasing global demand for energy. Through laboratory experiments, field trips, and discussions of current events, students will develop an understanding of the many issues related to meeting the world's energy needs. In particular, the dramatic economic growth in China and India raise additional issues about sustainable energy generation in the face of global imbalances in the carbon cycle.
    CHEM 107
  • ASIA 108: Spoken Chinese for Travelers
    This course is a foundational course in oral proficiency that employs a new method designed to have students quickly speaking and comprehending Mandarin Chinese. This course introduces Mandarin Chinese pronunciation, the pinyin transcription system, and modern colloquial Chinese. The emphasis is only on oral proficiency. The Chinese writing system is not required in this course. Overall, Chinese for Travelers is designed for students who seek to advance rapidly in Chinese as well as prepare for upper-level language study. Particularly for those who aspire to travel abroad, the class offers basic and practical language-survival skills. Of course, the class is also geared to pique your interest in a beautiful land, culture, and people. No prerequisites.
    CHIN 108
  • ASIA 109: Chinese in the Business World
    The course is designed for students and working professionals who have no prior knowledge of Chinese, and are interested in conducting business in China. The objective of this course is to build a solid foundation of basic Chinese in the business context, with a focus on speaking and listening. Topics in the course cover basic daily corporate interactions and business-related social exchanges such as meeting people, introducing companies, making inquiries and appointments, visiting companies, introducing products, initiating dining invitations, etc. This course will also help you gain a better understanding of Chinese business culture, and assist you in overcoming the problems in cross-cultural communication from a comparative perspective. No prerequisite. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    CHIN 109
  • ASIA 110: Beginning Chinese I
    This course is an introduction to the forms of spoken Chinese. Most of the fundamental structures are covered in Chinese 110 and 112, together with writing practice. 112 is a continuation of 110. Lab work is an integral part of the sequence.
    CHIN 110
  • ASIA 111: Beginning Japanese I
    An introduction to the form of spoken Japanese along with Japanese customs and culture.Most of the fundamental structures are covered in Japanese 110 and 112, together with writing practice in the hiragana and the katakana syllabaries. 112 is a continuation of 110. Lab work is an integral part of the sequence. No prerequisites.
    JAPN 110
  • ASIA 112: Beginning Chinese II
    This course is an introduction to the forms of spoken Chinese. Most of the fundamental structures are covered in Chinese 110 and 112, together with writing practice. 112 is a continuation of 110. Lab work is an integral part of the sequence. Prerequisite: CHIN 110 or equivalent.
    CHIN 112
  • ASIA 113: Beginning Japanese II
    An introduction to the form of spoken Japanese along with Japanese customs and culture. Most of the fundamental structures are covered in Japanese 110 and 112, together with writing practice in the hiragana and the katakana syllabaries and some basic kanji. 112 is a continuation of 110. Lab work is an integral part of the sequence. Prerequisite: Japanese 110 or equivalent.
    JAPN 112
  • ASIA 114: Basic Spoken Chinese
    (Basic Spoken Chinese: An Introduction to Speaking and Listening for Beginners.). Basic Spoken Chinese is a beginning-level course in oral proficiency that employs a new method designed to have students quickly speaking and comprehending Mandarin Chinese. This course introduces Mandarin Chinese pronunciation, the pinyin transcription system, and modern colloquial Chinese. The emphasis is only on oral proficiency. Learning the Chinese writing system is not required in this course. This course is designed for students who seek to advance rapidly in spoken Chinese. It is designed to prepare students for study abroad or to enhance their interest in China. CHIN 113 may not be taken concurrently or subsequently to CHIN110 or CHIN112. CHIN 210 may be taken after CHIN 113. No prerequisites.
    CHIN 113
  • ASIA 185: Film and Religion
    Viewing films as meaningful texts, this course examines the perspectives offered by Asian and American filmmakers on such religious questions as: What does it mean to be human? How does death inform the living of life? How do values shape relationships? What is community and how is it created? What is ethical behavior? The range of films explored here function as vehicles for entering religious worldviews, communicating societal values, and probing different responses to the question of how to live a meaningful life. No prerequisites. Intended for first-year students and sophomores. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    RELG 185, CINE 185
  • ASIA 200: Origins of East Asia
    Introduction to the great civilizations of China and Japan, with emphasis on development of their fundamental characteristics. Highlights both shared traditions and significant differences between the two countries. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    HIST 212, IREL 233
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  • ASIA 201: Modern East Asia
    Study of China, Japan, and Korea as each moved toward modern nationhood over the last 200 years. Attention to the difficulties each has confronted, including Japan's vision of empire shattered by World War II, China's civil war, and Korea's transformation through foreign interventions. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    HIST 213, IREL 234
  • ASIA 205: Japanese Art and Culture
    The course focuses on the history of Japanese art from neolithic to modern times, with emphasis on the art forms of the major periods and their relationship to social, political, and religious developments. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ARTH 205
  • ASIA 206: Chinese Art
    This course examines the history of Chinese art from the Bronze Age to the present with emphasis on the major art forms and their relationship to contemporary social, political, and religious development. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ART 206
  • ASIA 210: Intermediate Chinese
    This course will continue the fundamentals of Chinese conversation begun in the first-year series, Chinese 110 and 112, and continue work on reading and writing the language. Extensive oral practice and conversation exercises are stressed. Classes will be supplemented with laboratory exercises and written work. Prerequisite: CHIN 112 or equivalent.
    CHIN 210
  • ASIA 211: Intermediate Japanese
    This course will continue the fundamentals of Japanese conversation begun in the first-year series, Japanese 110 and 112, and continue work on reading and writing the language. Extensive oral practice and conversation exercises are stressed. Classes will be supplemented with work in the language laboratory and daily written work. Prerequisite: Japanese 112 or consent of instructor.
    JAPN 210
  • ASIA 212: Advanced Intermediate Chinese
    This is the second course in intermediate Chinese. It focuses on further developments of the four language skills to support sustained oral and written performance at the intermediate level to prepare students for third year Chinese study. The focus will be on oral expression with expanding vocabulary, enhancing understanding of grammar, and introducing more complex structures and texts. Prerequisite: CHIN 210 or equivalent.
    CHIN 212
  • ASIA 213: Global Islam
    This course explores the origin and development of the Islamic religious tradition, along with varying interpretations of Islamic law and prominent issues facing contemporary Muslims around the world. Participants in the course read classical and contemporary literature as windows into Muslim life in different cultures and historical periods, and view Islamic art and architecture as visual texts. To learn about the rich diversity within Islam, students can work with texts, rituals, poetry, music, and film from a range of cultures within the Muslim world, from the Middle East, Africa, and Asia to Europe and North America. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    RELG 213, ISLM 213, IREL 263
  • ASIA 214: Global Hinduism
    This course examines the teachings of the Hindu religious tradition as presented in the earliest writings of the tradition, as well as in dramas, epic narratives, and contemporary religious practice. In the course of the semester, we will visit Hindu Temples in the Chicago area as we explore the historical, social, and cultural context of Indian religious themes as they continue to be practiced in the 21st century. Texts range from philosophical musings about the nature of the universe to the story of a king who loses his wife to a 10-headed demon. (Meets Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    RELG 214, IREL 264
  • ASIA 215: Global Buddhism
    An introduction to the origins of Buddhism in India as well as to the major cultural and historical influences on the spread of Buddhism throughout Asia, particularly in India, Sri Lanka, Myanmar, Thailand, Tibet, China, and Japan. The course will examine various forms of Buddhist practice including devotion, ethics, sangha membership, meditation, rituals, and festivals. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    RELG 215, IREL 265
  • ASIA 216: Chinese Religions
    Focusing primarily on the teachings of the Confucian (and neo-Confucian), Daoist, and early Chinese Buddhist traditions, we will explore the concepts and practices of these communities within their historical, cultural, and social contexts. Reading narrative, poetic, and classical texts in translation that present such ideas as the ethics of human-heartedness, the relativity of all things, and the importance of self-sacrifice, we will discuss what teachings these masterful texts offer 21st century questioners. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    RELG 216, IREL 266
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  • ASIA 217: Religions of Asia
    (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • ASIA 218: Asian Politics
    (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • ASIA 219: Advanced Intermediate Japanese
    A continuation of the Japanese language fundamentals begun in Japanese 110, 112, and 210. Extensive practice in oral expression and increasingly stronger emphasis on reading and writing, with an extensive use of audio and video materials. Prerequisite: Japanese 210 or consent of the instructor.
    JAPN 212
  • ASIA 220: Islam and Pop Culture
    In recent decades the global Islamic revival has produced a new generation of Muslim film stars and fashion models, Sufi self-help gurus, Muslim comic book heroes, romance novel writers, calligraphy artists, and even Barbie dolls. This course explores the pop sensations, market niches, and even celebrity scandals of 'Popular Islam' within the broader context of religious identity, experience, and authority in Islamic traditions. Balancing textual depth with geographic breadth, the course includes several case studies: Egypt, Indonesia, Iran, Mali, Turkey, and North America. Students will learn about how religious trends are created -- and debated -- on pop culture's public stage. We will reflect critically on both primary materials and inter-disciplinary scholarly writings about the relationships between pop culture, religious identities, devotional practices, and political projects. No pre-requisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    RELG 220, ISLM 220, IREL 260
  • ASIA 224: Literature of the Vietnam War
    This course examines the Vietnam War as refracted through various literary genres. The readings for the course include Graham Greene's The Quiet American, Tim O'Brien's The Things They Carried, and Truong Nhu Tang's Vietcong Memoir. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ENGL 224, AMER 224
  • ASIA 230: East Asian Lit in Translation
    (East Asian Literature in Translation taught in English). This course is an introduction to traditional East Asian literature with the primary focus on China, Japan and Korea. It will concentrate on several themes, topics, authors and representative works of traditional Chinese, Japanese and Korean literature; emphasis on critical reading. This course will provide the students an opportunity to enjoy the most well known poems, novels and short stories produced by the prominent authors of the genres. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    CHIN 230
  • ASIA 232: Chinese Cinema
    This course provides a historical, critical, and theoretical survey of Chinese cinema, broadly defined to include films from Mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. We will look at the specific political, social, economic, technological and aesthetic factors that have influenced the shape and character of Chinese cinema over the last century. We will discuss a range of works by internationally directors, including Zhang Yimou, Feng Xiaogang, Stephen Chow, Ang Lee, etc. As this course serves as a general introduction to Chinese film, it is intended for students who have little or no knowledge of China. All films screened for the course have English subtitles, so no knowledge of the Chinese language is required. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement).
    CHIN 232, CINE 232
  • ASIA 247: Anthropology of Pacific Islands
    This course is intended to provide an ethnographic and historical overview of classic and contemporary directions of anthropological research in the eastern Pacific. The primary course goal is to develop n ethnographic and historical appreciation for Polynesian culture at the three points of the Polynesian triangle. We will work toward this goal by a focused examination of the cultures of particular island groups in the eastern Pacific. En route, students will be introduced to issues as diverse as Polynesian voyaging and myths, and the ways that traditional cultural beliefs and practices and the social institutions in which they coalesce such as chieftanship, kinship and adoption are subject to historical change. We will pay particular attention to the distinct expressions of social relationships and cultural forms that developed under varying conditions across the region. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    SOAN 247
  • ASIA 251: Intro to Chinese Literature in Engl
    (Introduction to Chinese Literature in English) This course will introduce students to Chinese literature through representative works of philosophy, poetry, folklore and modern short stories. The goal of this course is twofold: to grant students glimpses into the rich repertoire of Chinese literature and hence insights into the fundamental humanistic traditions of China; and to develop a set of skills of literary analysis. No knowledge of Chinese language or prior coursework on Chinese culture is required. Taught in English. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    CHIN 251
  • ASIA 252: Chinese Literature and Civilization
    (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
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  • ASIA 253: Philosophy of Self: East and West
    The course will examine how great thinkers from East and West, ancient and modern times, have tackled the relation between reason, passion, and desire. We will study Plato's tripartite model of the soul, the Stoic monism, especially Chrysippus' theory of desire, and various Eastern concepts such as self-overcoming, unselfing, and self-forgetting. We will also include some basic readings from the scientific discussions on mirror neurons and Antonio Damasio's writings on self and emotion. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    PHIL 253, IREL 283
  • ASIA 255: 21st Century Islam
    The 1.5 billion Muslims around the world represent an immense diversity of languages, ethnicities, cultures, contexts and perspectives. This course focuses on 21st century issues faced by Muslims living in different cultures. Contemporary social issues are examined in light of different interpretations of Islamic practice, global communication and social networks, elements of popular culture, and the interface between religion and government. Biographies, short stories, contemporary journalism, and films that explore life in Muslim and non-Muslim countries present a nuanced portrait of contemporary Islam. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    RELG 255, ISLM 255, IREL 268
  • ASIA 260: Intro to Chinese Culture in English
    This course will explore elements of Contemporary Chinese culture and themes related to living, studying or working in China, as seen in films, videos, internet sources, and selected fiction and non-fiction texts. Topics covered include China's diverse geography, peoples and cuisine, doing business in China, the societal role of Chinese medicine, festivals and weddings, interpreting folk and contemporary art forms, current trends and themes in popular culture. This course will be taught in English. No prerequisite. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    CHIN 260
  • ASIA 273: Global Engagement Contemp China I
    Focused on contemporary China, this course provides an introduction to Chinese culture, history, politics, and society. Using lecture, readings, discussions, and field trips, the class creates an opportunity for students to engage contemporary issues facing Chinese culture and society. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • ASIA 274: 21st Century China
    An interdisciplinary class based on individual research and experiential learning in China, this course consists of 8 on-campus orientation sessions, individual pre-travel research, and participation in Asia-related events during the spring semester. The primary focus of the class is a 21-day May study tour in China, followed by post-travel research projects due in June. Pre-requisites: one Asian Studies class or 1 year of an Asian language; and approval for off-campus study. Open to sophomores and juniors. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.) Applicants for early decision (spring) must submit all Stage I and II forms to the Office of Off-Campus Programs, and completed applications and references for the May China Program to the Dean of Faculty Office by May 1. If openings remain unfilled, a second round of applications will be accepted in the fall. Fall Stage I and II forms must be submitted to the Office of Off-Campus Programs, and May China Program applications to the Dean of Faculty Office by October 15.
  • ASIA 275: Desire and Discipline: Asian Morals
    This course offers a focused historical narrative of the development of Asian moral thinking. It shows, at its early phase, how a particular moral philosopher's thinking (such as Mencius and Xun-zi) is largely determined by his thinking on human nature. However, in later periods, particularly after the importation of Buddhism, the debates on human nature are replaced by an intense cognitive and metaphysical interest in the human mind. Moral cultivation begins to focus less on following moral rules but more on cultivating the mind. The effect of this nature-mind shift on Asian moral thinking is both historically profound and theoretically surprising. Readings: Confucius, Mencius, Xun-zi, Lao zi, Zhuang zi, Zhang Zai, Chen Brothers, Zhu Xi and D. T. Suzuki. (Meets the GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    PHIL 275, IREL 285
  • ASIA 276: Female Religious Images in Asia
    Goddess figures in India, China, and Japan are studied in this class along with the roles of human women in particular Asian religious traditions. This class explores the experiences of Buddhist nuns, Hindu and Muslim female saints, traditional healers, and shamans. Readings are drawn from religious texts, myths, and short stories from specific Asian cultures. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    RELG 276, GSWS 276
  • ASIA 279: Hinduism and Narrative
    (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • ASIA 280: Architecture in East Asia
    This course explores a diverse body of architecture in China and Japan from ancient to contemporary times. We will investigate the major architectural types in traditional East Asia - including cities, temples, palaces, gardens, and houses - as well as individual monuments like Japan's Himeji Castle and the 'Bird's Nest' Olympic stadium in Beijing. In addition to examining the architectural history of these sites, we will discuss thematic issues related to design, space, landscape, ritual, memory, and modernity. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ARTH 280
  • ASIA 282: Visions of Family
    (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
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  • ASIA 283: Modern China
    Relying as much as possible on Chinese texts (in translation), this course will examine such topics as China's response to Western imperialism in the nineteenth century; the 1911 Revolution; the May Fourth Movement; the birth of the People's Republic of China; the Cultural Revolution; and the Democracy Movement of the 1980s. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    HIST 260, IREL 230
  • ASIA 284: World War II in Asia
    Through lecture and discussion, we will look at the origins of the war; the invasion of China and the Rape of Nanking; battle at sea and on the mainland of Asia; surrender; lives of individual soldiers, diplomats, refugees, POWs, 'comfort women,' collaborators, and guerrillas; and continuing controversies over memory, apology, reparation, and national identity. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement).
    HIST 264, IREL 232
  • ASIA 285: Topics in Japanese Thought
    The course focuses on the Japanese understanding of nature, life, and history. We will focus on the ideas of fragility, impermanence, and beauty. Students will learn the central ideas of Zen Buddhism. Topics to be covered may include artistic representations in Noh plays, Tea ceremonies, and the Samurai culture. Prerequisite: any course in Asian thought or permission of the instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement).
    PHIL 285, IREL 288
  • ASIA 286: Modern Japan
    From the founding of the last shogunate, the Tokugawa, in 1603 to its present status as an economic giant among the nations of the Pacific. Attention to the achievements as well as the undeniable sufferings and costs incurred during Japan's drive toward great power. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    HIST 262, IREL 231
  • ASIA 305: Comp Philosophy: East & West
    Comparative investigation of Eastern and Western philosophical sources; elucidation and critical examination of fundamental presuppositions, unique conceptual formulations, and alternative approaches to general philosophical issues. Prerequisite: One Western philosophy course and one Asian area course, or consent of the instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    PHIL 305, IREL 385
  • ASIA 306: Buddhist Arts of Asia
    In the early centuries CE, Buddhism spread eastward from its origins in India to China, Korea, and Japan. It brought with it a rich religious tradition that altered forever the visual arts of these regions. Students in this course will explore the painting, sculpture, and monuments of the East Asian Buddhist world from ancient times to the twentieth century, paying particular attention to issues of patronage, ritual, iconography, symbolism, and style in order to better understand the complex relationships between religion and art. No pre-requisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ARTH 306
  • ASIA 307: Topics in East Asian History
    (Topics in East Asian History) Spring 2015 Topic: China's Cultural Revolution.The Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, broke out more than thirty years ago (1966-1976), has been recognized as the darkest era in the history of the People's Republic of China. A comprehensive mass movement initiated by Mao Zedong to eliminate the so-called 'counterrevolutionary elements' in the country's institutions and leadership, the revolution was characterized by nationwide chaos, ultra-leftist frenzy, political zealotry, purges of intellectuals, extreme social turmoil, and ultimate economic collapse. This course intends to reconstruct the history of the Cultural Revolution by revealing the causes of the calamity and prevent human disaster from repeating itself in the future. Prerequisite: One course in Asian history or permission of the instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement)
    HIST 340, IREL 330
  • ASIA 309: Problems Modern Chinese Hist: Film
    (Problems in Modern Chinese History: Film) What are the enduring problems of modern China? How have different Chinese governments confronted them? We will study twentieth-century transformations in Chinese society, politics, and culture on the mainland and Taiwan in the light of modern Chinese and international history through film and discussion of the major issues addressed by Western scholarship. Basic topics to be covered include Sino-Western relations; tradition and modernization; peasant rebellions; revolution and reforms; religion; culture and society; modern science; and intellectuals and the state. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    HIST 342, IREL 332
  • ASIA 310: East-West Seminar
    (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • ASIA 312: Chinese Oral & Written Proficiency
    This course is a continuation of Chinese 212. The focus will be on oral and written expression in cultural context, expanding vocabulary and enhancing understanding of Chinese grammar. Chinese idiomatic expressions and various aspects of Chinese culture will also be explored throughout the course. Prerequisite: CHIN 212 or equivalent. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    CHIN 312
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  • ASIA 313: Chinese for Int'l Affairs&Business
    (Chinese for International Affairs and Business). The course grounds students in real-world applications of political, economic and business/marketing concepts and terminology. The goal of this course is to develop students' Chinese language skills in a communicative political and business context while being aware of Chinese socio-cultural issues. It includes a concurrent emphasis on business terminology, conducting business negotiations, reading newspapers, magazines, and other business-related documents, discussing news and current events, and understanding economic trends and situations in modern China. Particularly recommended for students who are thinking of careers in economics, business, politics, and international relations. Prerequisite: CHIN 212 or equivalent.
    CHIN 313
  • ASIA 314: Hindu Pilgrimage: India and Chicago
    The course explores the ritual practice of pilgrimage at major pilgrimage sites in India, and at parallel temples in the Chicago area. Using extensive field visits and the framework of pilgrimage as the structure of the course, the class prepares for and visits 5-6 Hindu temples in the Chicago area to observe rituals being performed, speak with practitioners, and experience festival worship. Through reading and film, we examine the history, literature, ritual traditions, art, and music of Hindu pilgrims. Following specific pilgrimage routes, we explore this religious practice as it is conducted within 21st century cultures of expanding global communities, in India and in Chicago. The class will use primary source texts, maps, field visits to temples, film, and research to understand Hindu religious communities in India and Chicago. Prerequisite: Religion 214 or permission of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • ASIA 315: Japonisme/Occidentalism

  • ASIA 316: Walking to Heaven: Pilgrimage Asia
    Using a seminar format, this course will explore pilgrimage sites in a range of different Asian cultures including India, China, Japan, Korea, and Pakistan. Students will choose a specific pilgrimage site and religious tradition as the focus of their research. Through reading, film, discussion, research, and student presentations, we will examine the roles of pilgrims and traders, sacred place and sacred time, and the ritual elements present in Asian pilgrimage practices across different religious traditions including Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Christianity. Prerequisite: Religion 213, 214, 215 or 216 or permission of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • ASIA 318: Buddhism and Social Activism
    This course focuses on contemporary Buddhist practitioners in Asia, North America, and Europe committed to environmental movements, human rights activism, prison work, education in impoverished communities, women's rights advocacy, hospice care, and peacemaking. Engaged Buddhists from Japan and Vietnam to Thailand, Burma/Myanmar, India, and North America advocate social action rooted in Buddhist values as a form of religious practice. Using Buddhist texts, films, and case studies, participants research specific aspects of contemporary Engaged Buddhist practice, as a way to explore the relationship between social action and spiritual understanding. Students with experience in the following disciplines may find this course particularly intriguing: sociology, anthropology, environmental studies, history, politics, international relations, women?s studies, and Asian Studies. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    RELG 318
  • ASIA 319: Race & Empire in Colonial S Asia
    (Race and Empire in Colonial South Asia) This course studies colonialism as a cultural project of power, including the connections between imperialism, race, and colonial ideologies of rule in India from the inception of British rule in the mid-eighteenth century until independence in 1947. More specifically, it examines the various ways in which colonial state power was shaped by class, race and gender as the British sought to 'civilize' and rule their Indian subjects. The course also probes some of the ways in which various social groups in India engaged with colonial racial categories and the rhetoric of race during the period of the struggle against British rule. Scholarly accounts will be supplemented by films and literary works to illuminate the various themes under study. Prerequisite: Hist 202 or 203 or permission of the instructor. (Meets the GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    HIST 347
  • ASIA 322: Emerging Markets Analysis
    Analysis of emerging markets of East Asia and Latin America, paying particular attention to growth strategies and the impact of market reforms, financial markets development, and foreign capital flows on economic performance of these countries. The course relies on case studies from Asian countries of China, South Korea, Thailand, Singapore, and Hong Kong and Latin American economies of Brazil, Argentina, Mexico, and Chile. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.) Prerequisite: ECON 220
    BUSN 322, LNAM 322, IREL 310
  • ASIA 330: World Performance
    (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • ASIA 420: China, Japan and the West
    This seminar situates the long history of China, Japan and the West in a world historical context, examining the multiple interactions between China and its partners and adversaries in the past. We will touch on sweeping themes, such as the traditional Chinese tribute system, the formation of empire and efforts to create modern nation-states in China and Japan, industrialization and capitalism, Western imperialism, and cultural interchange between China and Japan and the West, through specific historical topics, using primary sources where possible. The goal of this course is to encourage students who are interested in History to develop their capacity to use analytical skills in historical research.
    HIST 420
  • ASIA 471: Asian Bus Culture & Trade Relations
    Asian Business Culture and Trade Relations. As China, Singapore, South Korea, and Taiwan expand trade activities and increase their global influence, other Asian nations (Cambodia, Laos, Malaysia, Vietnam) continue to face economic hardships. This course will address geographic, historic, cultural, economic, and political factors that influence business opportunities, economic development, and quality of life in Asia. An emphasis will be on regional and global trade relations related to health care, infrastructure, food distribution, telecommunications, and education/job training. Instructional experiences will include field research involving Chicago-area resources along with analytic activities and case problems for business organizations operating or considering operations in Asia. (May be taken by business and Asian studies majors to meet GEC Senior Studies Requirement. Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement if not used for GEC Senior Studies Requirement.). Prerequisites: BUSN 130 (or BUSN 180), BUSN 230, ECON 210, ECON 220, and FIN 210 (or FIN 237); or permission of instructor for Asian Studies majors.
    BUSN 471
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  • ASIA 489: Globalization and Its Impact
    Examines the impact of globalization on rich countries (the United States) and poor countries (Mexico, India, and China). An examination of free trade agreements will cast light on the political motives behind these agreements as well as the economic projections made. The economic impact of the creation of free trade zones is explored using both microeconomics and macroeconomics. Statistical evidence will document whether globalization has caused growth in GDP, employment, and income in poor countries. The responsibility of multinational companies in creating sweatshops, worker exploitation, and cultural disintegration are discussed in light of U.S. businesses located in Mexico, India, and China. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement. May be taken by economics and business majors to meet GEC Senior Studies Requirement.) Prerequisites: Economics 110, 180, 210, and 220.
  • ASIA 493: Research Project
    Independent research plus regular discussions of that research in meetings of students and faculty. (Students registering for a research project over two semesters would register for regular research project credit in the semester without the colloquium.) Open to senior majors and others with permission of the chair.
  • ASIA 494: Senior Thesis
    Senior thesis project plus regular discussion of that research in meetings of students and faculty. (Students writing a thesis over two semesters would register for regular thesis credit in the semester without the colloquium.) Open to senior majors.

 

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  • BIOL 102: People and the World of Plants
    This course introduces students to the fascinating world of the botanical sciences, and to the long legacy of plant-human interaction. We will study traditional modes of herbal healing found in different cultures, explore the origins and development of world agriculture, and consider the effects of stimulant, depressive, and psychotropic plants on the human mind. Field trips to the Chicago Botanic Garden and local prairie and woodland restoration projects will be an important component of this course. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • BIOL 103: Human Biology
    This course examines the structure and function of many of the major organ systems of the human body. In so doing, it will introduce students to a range of important topics related to human beings. These will include the nature of science as a discipline, and the biological basis of health, disease, nutrition, exercise, sensation, and reproduction.
  • BIOL 104: Human Genetics
    An introduction to the inheritance of human characteristics. The nature of the genes, structure and function of chromosomes, developmental genetics, and the relationship between genes and human disease are discussed. Cloning, genetic engineering, and gene therapy are also covered. Three hours per week.
  • BIOL 105: Public Health
    Food poisoning outbreaks, strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, and the rise of infectious diseases including AIDS and TB have brought new awareness and the realization that public health is not just a concern of Third World countries. These and other topics including environmental factors that influence health, vaccine schedules, and how antibiotics work will be covered. Lectures, discussion, and student group projects. Three hours per week.
  • BIOL 106: Nutrition and the Human Body
    American culture is obsessed with food, but what do we really know about food? This course will explore multiple biological aspects of food. The course will begin with basic nutrition and then study diets, vitamins, and other supplements to determine if they really work. The biological, genetic, and environmental aspects of disorders such as obesity, anorexia, diabetes, heart disease, and cancer will be examined. The safety of food has become a greater concern in society due to genetic engineering, irradiation of food, use of pesticides, and food-borne illness such as 'mad cow' and E. coli. These risks will be studied. The course will conclude with an exploration of the effects of meat- or grain-based diets on the environment.
  • BIOL 108: Learning About the Living World
    This course will examine selected topics in life science and earth science such as the human body and its functioning, ecology, ecosystems, weather, the water cycle, and erosion. Designed primarily to provide elementary education majors with the necessary background for teaching in K-8 schools, the course is appropriate for other students interested in strengthening their knowledge and confidence in investigating fundamental concepts and ideas in science. Students will participate in lectures, discussion, student presentations and projects, and laboratory activities. Does not satisfy requirements for the Biology major.
    EDUC 108
  • BIOL 114: Truth and Lies in Medical News
    Students will learn to critically review health research from a variety of sources including professional and academic journals, popular magazines and newspapers, other media sources reporting on medical topics, and the Internet. We will apply analytic skills from a variety of disciplines including human biology, medicine and nursing, biostatistics and public health. Students will be introduced to health research, beginning with application of the scientific method, through study design data collection, quantitative analysis methods, and research reporting. Topical examples will be drawn from medicine, nursing, nutrition, alternative health care, public health, gerontology, exercise, and general health.
  • BIOL 115: Science and Popular Culture
    For many individuals, an understanding of science is often obtained from popular entertainments such as novels, television shows, and movies. In this course, students will examine science from a biological perspective as it is portrayed in popular culture. Students will critically assess the validity of science and scientific assumptions presented in popular culture, while also assessing how scientists are portrayed. As a result, students will better understand science both as a process and as a way of understanding the natural world. Specific topics will include genetic engineering, biological warfare, and plagues. The course will include lectures, student presentations, and papers.
  • BIOL 116: Exploring the Brain
    This course will address how the mind and brain work by exploring current and classical neurobiological topics, particularly those of interest to college students, through the use of professional and academic journals, textbooks, popular magazines and newspapers, as well as other media sources. Topics will include neuronal development and neuronal death; diseases of the brain, such as Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, depression, and psychiatric disorders; and topics such as drugs and alcoholism.
    NEUR 116
  • BIOL 117: Tropical Biology
    The immense biological diversity in the tropics provides scientists with a frontier for the discovery of new species, new drugs and new ecological relationships. This course will introduce non-science majors to tropical ecosystem structure and function, ecological relationships among forest species, medicinal uses of rainforest products and approaches to conservation in equatorial regions.
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  • BIOL 120: Organismal Biology
    This course will address the organization and function of multicellular organisms. Although focused primarily on plants and animals, other kinds of organisms will be discussed. Regulation, homeostasis, and integration of function; nutrient acquisition, processing, and assimilation; photosynthesis; gas exchange; reproductive patterns; and development are all topics that are included in this course. Readings from an introductory text and the secondary and primary scientific literature will be required. Students must also register for a lab. Co-requisite: CHEM 115. Science placement test required for entrance to both BIOL 120 and CHEM 115. Please see Requirements page on the Biology Department website for details.
  • BIOL 130: Bio Inq: Deadly Shape Hostage Brain
    (Biological Inquiry Seminar: Deadly Shapes, Hostage Brains) Age-related neurological diseases that hold our brain hostage are major 21st-century global health burdens and are among the most actively funded areas of medical research. In this course, students will delve into primary literature through research projects that investigate how deadly protein shapes underlie complex neurodegenerative illnesses, like Alzheimer's, Huntington disease, and Parkinson disease and discover how little we still know, despite astonishing advances. Students will dissect human brains to understand the underlying brain pathology. Trips to Chicago to visit neurology laboratories, neuroscience research centers, and attend a major neuroscience conference will present the latest advances in neurological research. Additionally, students will debate ethical dilemmas that face society as neuroscientists race towards solving current medical mysteries and experiment with potential new treatments. Students who have taken FIYS106 will not receive credit for this course. Two discussion/lecture and two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 120. Corequisite: CHEM 116.
    NEUR 130
  • BIOL 131: Bio Inq: Invasion Ecology
    (Biological Inquiry Seminar: Invasion Ecology) This course will introduce students to the study of invasive species. The course will demonstrate how invasive species are used to address complex issues in ecology, evolution, and biogeography, and how invasive species can affect habitat structure, community composition, and ecosystem services. Invasion ecology is integrative by its very nature and students will have the chance to explore numerous aspects in invasion ecology from local examples of species of economic and ecological concern, to species considered global epidemics. Specific examples will be driven by student interest. The course may include local field trips. Prerequisite: BIOL 120. Corequisite: CHEM 116.
  • BIOL 132: Bio Inq: Plant-Animal Interactions
    (Biological Inquiry Seminar: Plant-Animal Interactions) This course will introduce students to the ecological and evolutionary relationships between plants and the animals that eat them, defend them, or carry their pollen or seeds. The course will address chemical and physical plant defenses against animals, ecological interactions among plants and animals, and relationships in a community context, using examples from tropical, temperate, and marine ecosystems. The course includes local field trips. Prerequisite: BIOL 120. Corequisite: CHEM 116.
  • BIOL 133: Bio Inq: Tropical Forest Biology
    (Biological Inquiry Seminar: Tropical Forest Biology) The immense biological diversity in tropical forests provides scientists with a frontier for the discovery of new species, new drugs and new ecological relationships. This course will address tropical forest structure and function, ecological relationships among forest species and issues surrounding the conservation of tropical forests. The course may include local field trips. Prerequisite: BIOL 120. Corequisite: CHEM 116.
  • BIOL 134: Bio Inq: Emerging World Diseases
    (Biological Inquiry Seminar: Emerging World Diseases) In this age of antibiotics and vaccines, why do millions die each year from infectious diseases worldwide? With new viruses and pathogens continually emerging, can we ever hope to win the battle? This course will address the biological mechanism of infectious disease and the socio- economic and ecological factors that influence the outbreak of disease in various world populations. Emerging (e.g. SARS, Ebola, West Nile) and re-emerging (e.g. tuberculosis) diseases will be studied, as well as other major threats to global public health (e.g. malaria, anthrax). Discussion, lecture, student presentations, and laboratory sessions. Prerequisite: BIOL 120. Corequisite: CHEM 116. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • BIOL 135: Bio Inq: Human Ecology
    (Biological Inquiry Seminar: Human Ecology) Human beings are some of the most interesting, complicated, self serving, expressive, destructive, and beautiful organisms to evolve on Earth. Participants in Human Ecology will investigate the many ways in which the Earth is an ecosystem for humans, with the principal goal of this course to compare and contrast how humans have changed the Earth to better suit its needs as a species, and the consequences that have and are arising from such ecosystem modification. Topics covered through the course include human evolution, food acquisition, economics, and climate change among many others. Participants will be required to attend multiple field trips throughout the semester. One 3-hour meeting per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 120. Corequisite: CHEM 116.
  • BIOL 136: Bio Inq: Sensing the Environment
    (Biological Inquiry Seminar: Sensing the Environment) Virtually everything an animal does depends on receiving and correctly interpreting information from its external and internal environments. This course will examine the nature of different stimuli and the general properties of sensory reception. Specific biological examples will be chosen by students, and could include topics such as photoreception, chemoreception, mechanoreception, electroreception, thermoreception, magnetoreception, and nociception. Two discussion/lecture and two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 120. Corequisite: CHEM 116.
  • BIOL 137: Bio Inq: Diet & Disease
    (Biological Inquiry Seminar: Diet & Disease) The leading causes of disability and death in developed countries are multifactoral diseases that have a strong behavioral component, including: diabetes, heart disease, obesity and cancer. Are we truly what we eat? This course will examine the relationship between diet and human diseases. The semester will begin with a foundation of basic nutritional concepts including metabolism, daily requirements during growth, development and athletic training, as well as digestion and energy needs. In addition, we will examine the genetic, endocrine and neurological controls of eating and hunger and learn the cellular and physiological basis of the major food related diseases. We will critically analyze some popular diets and food supplements, in addition to analyzing different eating habits from around the world and assess if food groups promote or prevent different types of diseases. Prerequisite: BIOL 120. Corequisite: CHEM 116.
  • BIOL 138: Bio Inq: Human Evolution
    (Biological Inquiry Seminar: Human Evolution) This course will introduce students to basic concepts of evolution as they apply to the evolution of our own species, Homo sapiens. We will consider what fossil and molecular evidence tell us about the origin of the human species; how adaptive evolution has shaped human populations morphologically, physiologically, and behaviorally; how human evolution has been intertwined with the evolution of other organisms and diseases; and the ways in which humans are currently evolving and are likely to evolve in the future. Class sessions will combine discussion, short lectures, student presentations, and other formats. This course will emphasize development of abilities to critically read scientific literature, communicate effectively about science, appreciate how and why we do science, and use electronic tools to search scientific literature. Prerequisites: Biology 120 and Chemistry 115. Not open to students who have taken FIYS 177
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  • BIOL 139: Bio Inq: Biology Aging
    (Biological Inquiry Seminar: Biology Aging) From yeast to humans, virtually all organisms change with time. Various explanations have been proposed for aging and senescence, including environmental factors such as accumulated DNA damage, metabolism, and oxidative stress, as well as genetic factors regulating molecular clocks, cellular repair, and homeostasis. This course will investigate the physiology and underling mechanisms of aging focusing on current research. Students will explore the topics through reading of primary literature, discussion, writing assignments, and presentations. Three discussion/lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 120. Corequisite: CHEM 116.
  • BIOL 141: Bio Inq: Health Science Reporting
    (Biological Inquiry Seminar: Health Science Reporting) The scientific method requires researchers to build upon knowledge generated by others. Much of this knowledge is disseminated through scholarly articles in scientific journals. Because scientific papers are often complex, including technical terms and statistical analyses, misunderstandings are common. News and popular media broadcast medical and health findings to the general public, frequently oversimplifying or misinterpreting the science. In this course, students will critique medical journalism and medical research by comparing popular reporting to original scientific sources. Emphasizing reading and understanding of scholarly literature in medicine, students will develop their capacity to recognize, comprehend, and critique medical research. Class activities will include lectures, discussion, student presentations, and written exercises. Prerequisite: BIOL 120. Corequisite: CHEM 116.
  • BIOL 142: Bio Inq: The Biology of Dogs
    (Biological Inquiry Seminar: The Biology of Dogs) Dogs are not only 'man's best friend,' but are increasingly used as biological models for research. Our familiarity with their behavior, diseases, and pedigree has made them central to the study of many aspects of biology, including genetics, neurology, and evolution. In this course, students will explore the biology of dogs and what this tells us about ourselves. By the end of the course, students will have developed an understanding of the scientific process and the capacity to recognize the relevance of research on non-human models. Class activities will include lectures, discussions, student presentations, written exercises, laboratories, and field trips. Prerequisite: BIOL 120. Corequisite: CHEM 116.
  • BIOL 143: Bio Inq: The Biology of Sex
    (Biological Inquiry Seminar: The Biology of Sex) The ability to reproduce is a defining quality of life yet the diversity of methods used by organisms to replicate is staggering. In this course we explore the many ways that organisms reproduce, both sexually and asexually; how these different modes of reproduction evolved; the influence these modes of reproduction have on animal form and function; and what an understanding of the biology of sex tells us about human sex and sexuality. The course will address the misconception that gender roles (the 'promiscuous' male versus the 'coy' female) are biologically universal, and relate the diversity of sexual systems evident in biology to the diversity of human gender roles and sexuality. Class activities will include lectures, discussion, student presentations, written exercises, laboratories, and field trips. Prerequisite: BIOL 120 Corequisite: CHEM 116 (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • BIOL 144: Bio Inq: Brain That Changes Itself
    (Biological Inquiry Seminar: The Brain That Changes Itself) Our brains are able to reshape themselves over time, through a remarkable process known as neuroplasticity. This process is constantly occurring and extremely important, because it allows our brains to adapt to new experiences and remember novel information. In this course students will learn how neuroplasticity contributes to learning and memory. This will begin with a discussion of how nerve cells in the brain are organized and how they communicate to transfer information. Students will then explore how these cells and connections change over time, with an emphasis on how neuroplasticity contributes to learning and memory. The course will conclude with a discussion of how aging and neurodegenerative diseases impair plasticity and cognition. Students will use the primary literature to learn about cutting-edge electrophysiological, molecular, genetic, and imaging techniques used in the study of neuroplasticity. Discussion, lecture, research projects, and student presentations. Prerequisite: BIOL 120. Corequisite: CHEM 116.
  • BIOL 150: Reasoning & Statistical Inference
    (Reasoning and Statistical Inference in Biology) This course is designed to develop and expand students' understanding of quantitative biological information. The focus of the course is on quantitative literacy. Specific topics will include interpretation of descriptive statistics, graphical representations of biological data, bivariate statistics, and the results of hypothesis testing. Examples will be drawn from published and unpublished data sources, including and faculty and student research. Students will also work with practice datasets. Strongly recommended for first-year students interested in the Biology Major. Three lecture/discussion hours per week. No prerequisite.
  • BIOL 203: Spring Flora of the Great Lakes
    (Spring Flora of the Western Great Lakes.) This course introduces students to the identification, systematics, ecology, and natural history of the spring flora of the Western Great Lakes. This course includes extensive field work in the greater Chicago area and eastern Wisconsin. Students learn to identify between 150 and 200 species of wildflowers, grasses, trees, shrubs, and other plants, and learn the characteristics of 15 to 20 plant families. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Natural and Mathematical Sciences Requirement.) This Summer Session course in 2016 will be held in the afternoons on Tuesdays and Wednesdays plus full field days on Thursdays and Fridays.
    ES 203
  • BIOL 204: Summer Flora of the Great Lakes
    (Summer Flora of the Western Great Lakes). This course introduces students to the identification, systematics, ecology, and natural history of the summer flora of the Western Great Lakes. This course includes extensive field work in the greater Chicago area, eastern Wisconsin, and Michigan's Upper Peninsula. Students learn to identify between 150 and 200 species of wildflowers, grasses, trees, shrubs, and other plants, and learn the characteristics of 15 to 20 plant families. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Natural and Mathematical Sciences Requirement.) This Summer Session course in 2016 will be held in the afternoons on Mondays and Tuesdays plus full field days on Wednesdays and Thursdays.
    ES 204
  • BIOL 205: Field School: Lake Michigan Flora
    This course introduces students to the identification, systematics, evolution, ecology, and natural history of the summer flora of the land surrounding Lake Michigan. This course is an extensive off-campus three-week field course in Illinois, Wisconsin, Michigan and Indiana. Students learn to identify between 150 and 200 species of wildflowers, grasses, trees, shrubs, and other plants, and learn the characteristics of 15 to 20 plant families. Additional fee will be assessed. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Natural and Mathematical Sciences Requirement.)
    ES 205
  • BIOL 208: Human Anatomy
    This course introduces the structure of mammalian bodies, with particular emphasis on the human body. All of the major body systems (skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, etc.) are covered. Lab includes dissection and study of representative mammalian specimens, as well as study of human skeletons and models. Class meets seven hours per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 120, CHEM 115.
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  • BIOL 220: Ecology and Evolution
    The roles of ecological and evolutionary processes in shaping life's diversity are examined. Specific topics may include adaptive evolution, origins of species, reconstruction of evolutionary history, population dynamics and extinction, species interactions, community processes, conservation, and the importance of these topics to humanity. Lab sessions will combine group work in field research projects with quantitative analyses and synthesis of your findings in terms of published results from the primary literature. These projects will result in a written and/or oral presentation of your findings. This is an intermediate-level biology course that assumes prior experience with the primary scientific literature, analysis of quantitative data and mathematical models, and rigorous laboratory work. Three lecture hours plus one four-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 120, CHEM 115, and Biological Inquiry (13x-14x)
  • BIOL 221: Molecules, Genes, and Cells
    This course will examine cells as the fundamental units of life. Topics will include the structure and function of the cell and its molecular constituents; energy relationships at the cellular level; and an introduction to the nature and organization of the genetic material. Laboratory sessions will emphasize student-designed projects. Classroom sessions will involve group work, discussions, seminars, problem-solving sessions, and lectures. Three lecture and four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 120 and CHEM 116.
  • BIOL 320: Microbiology
    This course will focus on the biology of single-celled organisms, with emphasis on bacteria and infectious disease. Topics include antibiotic mechanisms and resistance, bacterial gene swapping, epidemiology, host-microbe interactions, and the immune response. Several weeks of independent study will allow the student to isolate, research, and identify three bacterial species. Three lecture and four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: Biol 221, and either Biol 220 or Junior status. Students must also register for a lab.
  • BIOL 322: Molecular Biology
    The structure and function of nucleic acids and proteins in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells: DNA replication, transcription, translation, and regulation. Laboratories will apply current molecular techniques to an open-ended research problem. Three lecture and four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: Biol 221, and either Biol 220 or Junior status.
  • BIOL 324: Advanced Cell Biology
    The structure and function of the cell and its organelles, with emphasis on membrane-related processes including transport, energetics, cell-to-cell signaling, and nerve and muscle cell function. Research reports will include extensive library and Internet exploration and analysis. Three lecture and four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: Biol 221, and either Biol 220 or Junior status.
    NEUR 324
  • BIOL 325: Topics in Advanced Cell Biology
    The structure and function of the cell and its organelles, with emphasis on the extracellular matrix, membrane-related processes including transport, cell-to-cell signaling, protein processing, and post-transcriptional regulation. Current techniques will be explored in the context of primary research literature. Research reports will include extensive library and Internet exploration and analysis. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: Biol 221, and either Biol 220 or Junior status. Not open to students who have taken BIOL 324.
  • BIOL 330: Applied Data Analy for Biologists
    (Applied Data Analysis for Biologists) This course introduces students to statistical analysis procedures as they are applied in biological research. Statistical content will introduce univariate and bivariate methods, moving on to multi-variable approaches. Classroom sessions will consist of lectures, discussions, and demonstrations. In addition to these more-formal sessions, a supervised laboratory in which students conduct hands-on computer-assisted statistical analyses, will take place weekly. Sample data will be drawn from multiple sub-disciplines within biology. These may include any of the following topics: cellular and molecular biology, organismal research, ecology, evolutionary biology, human physiology and medicine. Two 80-minute classroom and one four-hour laboratory meeting per week. Prerequisites: Math 150 or equivalent, Biol 220, and either Biol 221 or Junior status.
  • BIOL 340: Animal Physiology
    This course will focus on mechanisms of homeostasis in vertebrates and invertebrates. A particular emphasis will be placed on examining specific adaptations (functional, morphological, and behavioral) to different environmental conditions, as well as problems associated with physical size. Topics will include integration and response to stimuli, gas exchange, circulation, movement, buoyancy, metabolism, thermal regulation, osmoregulation, and excretion. Three lecture and four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: Biol 221, and either Biol 220 or Junior status.
    NEUR 340
  • BIOL 342: Developmental Biology
    Analysis of the genetic, molecular, and structural changes that occur between fertilization and the development of the adult form. This course will examine many concepts including establishment of cell fates, embryonic patterning, and morphogenesis. Students will also analyze key experiments and methods that have provided an understanding of development. The laboratory will demonstrate important developmental principles, such as fertilization, gastrulation, differentiation, and morphogenesis though the use of invertebrate and vertebrate organisms. Three discussion and four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: Biol 221, and either Biol 220 or Junior status. Students must also register for a lab.
    NEUR 342
  • BIOL 344: Animal Behavior
    A study of current ideas about the biological basis and evolution of animal behavior. Topics will include molecular, hormonal, and genetic bases of behavior; adaptive behavior patterns; mating systems and reproductive behavior; and evolution of altruism and helping behavior. Three lecture and four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: Biol 220, and either Biol 221 or Junior status.
    NEUR 344
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  • BIOL 346: Molecular Neuroscience
    Neurobiology associated with brain function (perception, movement, homeostasis, affect, and cognition), neurological and psychiatric illnesses, and brain injury. A reading- and writing-intensive course with a problem-based learning approach that comprehensively explores the breadth of neurobiology (molecular, cellular, anatomical, physiological, behavioral, and medical). Laboratory exercises emphasize neuroanatomy and neuronal cell biology. Several experimental projects complement lecture and laboratory learning. Six hours per week. Prerequisites: Biol 221, and either Biol 220 or Junior status.
    NEUR 346L
  • BIOL 352: Molecular Genetics
    A study of the molecular basis for inheritance, particularly with respect to human traits and disorders. Topics include the structure, expression, and segregation of genes and chromosomes, use of model organisms in the study of human disease, genetic engineering and gene therapy, and principles of genome science. Laboratory will apply current molecular techniques to an original research problem. Three lecture and four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: Biol 221, and either Biol 220 or Junior status. (Cross-listed as NEUR 352.)
    NEUR 352
  • BIOL 360: Mechanisms of Neurodegeneration
    This course will examine the cellular and physiological basis of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and prion disease. A special emphasis will be placed on investigating the primary causes of neurodegenerative diseases, such as the role of protein misfolding, genetics, and neurotransmitters. Cutting-edge primary literature will be used to provide a current understanding of neurodegeneration, as well as insights into the techniques and methods used in this field. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: Biol 221, and either Biol 220 or Junior status.
  • BIOL 362: Mechanisms of Brain Dysfunction
    This course will examine the biochemical and molecular basis of both rare and common nervous system disorders that are at the frontiers of molecular medicine. Students will select from illnesses that disable processes as diverse as memory, language, cognition, sensation, movement, emotion, and homeostasis. A special emphasis will be placed on investigating the primary causes of dysfunction, such as the role of protein misfolding, genetics, and neurotransmitters. By discussing the latest primary literature students will gain current understanding of neurological and psychiatric illnesses, as well as insights into the techniques and methods used in this field. Students will seek to further new knowledge by authoring an original grant proposal. Finally, depending on the semester offered, students will serve as advanced peer mentors for first year students either enrolled in FIYS 106 or BIOL 130 courses. Prerequisites: Biol 221, and either Biol 220 or Junior status. Two 80-minute sessions per week.
    NEUR 362
  • BIOL 370: Ecology
    This course examines current concepts and research in ecology at the levels of populations, communities, landscapes, ecosystems, and global processes. Emphasis will be placed on field research methods and reading of the primary literature. Lectures, discussions, and other classroom activities will be combined with field and laboratory exercises. Three classroom and four laboratory/field hours per week. Prerequisites: Biol 220, and either Biol 221 or Junior status. (Cross-listed as ES 370.)
  • BIOL 372: Pharmacology: Drug, Brain, Behavior
    In this course, we will explore ideas and principles regarding neuronal communication and drug interactions that govern behavior. We will explore communication patterns of both electrical and chemical signaling, define complex dynamics of drug distributions and identify how these processes are influenced by individual genetics. This class will also investigate the interaction between neurotransmitters and drugs at specific neuronal receptors, which will be discussed from the perspective of agonism and antagonism. We will use these principles to guide our understanding of pharmaco-therapeutics that are focused on symptom targeting. Students will also have the opportunity to discuss clinical cases and participate in the development of strategic therapeutic approaches based on current research towards the treatment of psychiatric and neurological disorders. Prerequisites: PSYC110 and BIOL221 with a grade of at least C-, or permission of instructor.
    NEUR 372, PSYC 372
  • BIOL 373: Community Ecology
    This course will address G. Evelyn Hutchinson's foundational question: 'Why are there so many kinds of animals?' We will approach this question by studying the mechanistic drivers of biodiversity, how diversity is maintained, and the interactions between species in communities. This course will consist of a weekly seminar presentation based on a topic in community ecology interspersed with student-led discussions based on readings from foundational and modern papers related to the lecture topic. The lab will focus on quantification of biodiversity, use of computer and statistical tools to analyze ecological data, and experimental design for field studies. Lab will culminate with students designing and conducting an original field-based research project applying the skills learned in lab to a relevant hypothesis discussed in class. Three lecture and four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: Biol 220, and either Biol 221 or Junior status.

  • BIOL 374: Biogeography
    This course will examine patterns of biodiversity, species distributions, island biogeography, the role of the Earth's history in shaping modern species distributions, and the impact of current climate change and land use change on future species distributions. Each week students will read foundational papers in Biogeography. We will then read a recent paper that touches on the questions raised in the foundational papers, with the idea of identifying both which foundational hypotheses have been well tested and, perhaps more interestingly, which have not. By discussing the latest primary literature, students will learn how to unite concepts and information from ecology, evolutionary biology, geology, and physical geography to answer questions of importance to modern society. The lab section of the course will be focused on learning GIS techniques and how they are applied to biologically interesting questions. Students will author an original research project applying the skills learned in lab to a relevant hypothesis discussed in class. Three 50-minute discussion sessions per week plus one lab section. Prerequisites: Biol 220, and either Biol 221 or Junior status.
  • BIOL 375: Conservation Biology
    This course will examine how biological principles and information can be applied to conservation of species, ecosystems, and natural resources. Topics may include endangered species, conservation genetics, landscape and ecosystem-level conservation, restoration, biodiversity in human-influenced systems, and others. This course is scheduled to allow extended field trips and will also include lecture, discussion, and other classroom and laboratory activities. Prerequisites: Biol 220, and either Biol 221 or Junior status. (Cross-listed as ES 375.)
  • BIOL 384: Plant Biology
    This course aims to provide a thorough knowledge and understanding of land and aquatic plants, photosynthetic protists and fungi, including: molecular biology; chemical organization and genetics; structures and functions of plant cells, tissues, and organs; principles of systematic botany, nomenclature, and classification; evolutionary relationships among the major groups; and the relationship between plants and their environments. An emphasis on hands-on experimentation will allow students to design experiments, analyze data, and present their results. Three 50-minute lectures and one 3-hour lab per week are required. Prerequisites: Biol 220, and either Biol 221 or Junior status.
    ES 384
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  • BIOL 389: Evolution
    This course will focus on the mechanisms of evolutionary change, ranging from short-term microevolutionary processes within populations to the origins of new species. Topics will include evidence for evolution, short-term microevolutionary processes, natural selection, adaptation, phylogenetic reconstruction, divergence and speciation, 'evo-devo', and human evolution. Classroom sessions will consist of lectures, discussions, and student presentations. Three lecture and four laboratory hours per week (including Field Museum trips). Prerequisites: Biol 220, and either Biol 221 or Junior status.
  • BIOL 389: Evolution
    This course will focus on the mechanisms of evolutionary change, ranging from short-term microevolutionary processes within populations to the origins of new species. Topics will include evidence for evolution, short-term microevolutionary processes, natural selection, adaptation, phylogenetic reconstruction, divergence and speciation, 'evo-devo', and human evolution. Classroom sessions will consist of lectures, discussions, and student presentations. Three lecture and four laboratory hours per week (including Field Museum trips). Prerequisites: Biol 220, and either Biol 221 or Junior status.
    NEUR 389
  • BIOL 479: Sr Sem: Receptors and Signal Transd
    Senior Seminar: Receptors and Signal Transduction. This course is designed to provide a capstone experience for biology and neuroscience majors. It will focus on the neurobiology of sensory receptors and signal transduction mechanisms. Specific topics will depend on student interests, and may include photoreception, chemoreception, mechanoreception, electroreception, thermoreception, magnetoreception, and/or nociception. Classes will involve discussions of the primary literature, student presentations, and short lectures. Prerequisite: Open to senior biology and neuroscience majors who have completed at least one 300-level course in the major or by permission of the instructor.
    NEUR 479
  • BIOL 480: Neural Frontiers
    This course is designed to provide a scholarship capstone for biology and neuroscience majors. Students will explore diverse topics of their interest at the frontiers of neuroscience, one of the most active research fields of the 21st century that is regularly considered as science's final frontier. Students will select from topics as diverse as memory, language, cognition, sensation, movement, neural stem cells, and complex neurological diseases. Students will engage in the art of being a scientific scholar in three complementary ways. They will learn new knowledge by discussing the latest primary literature in journal clubs. They will seek new knowledge by authoring an original grant proposal. They will explore how a career in science extends knowledge by role-playing a world famous neuroscientist. Finally students will serve as consultants for First-Year Studies students. Prerequisite: Open to senior biology and neuroscience majors who have completed at least one 300-level course in the major or by permission of the instructor.
    NEUR 480
  • BIOL 481: Sr Sem: Oncology
    (Senior Seminar: Oncology) This course will examine characteristics of cancer at the cellular and organismal levels, as well as investigate the current methods of treatment and prevention of cancer. This will involve intensive library research, report writing, and student led discussions and presentations. Prerequisite: Open to senior biology and neuroscience majors who have completed at least one 300-level course in the major or by permission of the instructor.
    NEUR 481
  • BIOL 482: Sr Sem: Sex and Evolution
    (Senior Seminar: Sex and Evolution) An application of evolutionary principles to understanding phenomena related to sexual reproduction. This seminar will emphasize theory and empirical tests of theory reported in the primary literature in evolution, behavior, and genetics. Exact topics will depend on student interests. Classes will involve discussions, student presentations, and short lectures. Prerequisite: Open to senior biology and neuroscience majors who have completed at least one 300-level course in the major or by permission of the instructor.
    NEUR 482
  • BIOL 483: Sr Sem: Plant and Animal Interact
    (Senior Seminar: Plant and Animal Interactions) This course will examine the ecological and evolutionary relationships between plants and the animals that eat them, defend them, or carry their pollen or seeds. The course will address plant defenses against animals, ecological interactions among plants and animals, and relationships in a community context, using examples from tropical and marine ecosystems as well as those of North America and Europe. Particular attention will be given to changes over geological time and the central importance of these relationships in maintaining food production and conservation of biological diversity. Prerequisite: Open to senior biology majors who have completed at least one 300-level Biology course or by permission of instructor.
  • BIOL 484: Sr Sem: Biology of Extinctions
    Human-induced extinctions are proceeding at an incredible rate, which will have wide-ranging effects on current biological systems. Extinctions of human diseases have been thought of as beneficial, whereas enormous effort has been expended to protect a few survivors of disappearing plants and animals. Specific topics will depend on student interests, but may include historic patterns in extinction, historic and modern causes of extinctions, and the biological and economic implications of extinctions. Topics will be studied by analysis of the primary literature and include student-selected case studies. Classes will involve discussions, student presentations, and short lectures. Prerequisite: Open to senior biology majors who have completed at least one 300-level course in the major or by permission of the instructor.
  • BIOL 485: Sr Sem: The Nobel Prizes
    (Senior Seminar: The Nobel Prizes: A Century of Innovation and Discovery) Koch, Fleming, Muller, Watson, Crick, von Bekesy, Golgi, and y Cajal are all Nobel Prize winners. Why are some names known to non-science students, whereas others are not even recognizable to most scientists? Every fall the Nobel Prize committee announces their awards. While their deliberations are shrouded in secrecy, the fame of the award is such that the general public often knows the names of winners. This course will examine the work and life of select prize winners in physiology/medicine and chemistry over the past 100 years. Reading will include the original work by the Novel laureates, as well as biographies and autobiographies of the winners. Discussion, presentations and papers will examine the impact of the winners' work, including a critical analysis of how important the work was at the time and how important it remains today, and why some awards were given years after the work was conducted, while others were recognized within a few years. The course will also include a history of the prize and of Alfred Nobel, and explore controversies associated with the award, including the dearth of female recipients. The semester will conclude with nominations for next year's award winners. Prerequisite: Open to senior biology and neuroscience majors who have completed at least one 300-level course in the major or by permission of the instructor.
    NEUR 485
  • BIOL 486: Sr Sem: Biol Natural Hallucinogens
    (Senior Seminar: Biology of Natural Hallucinogens) A wide range of plants, fungi, and animals produce psychoactive compounds, primarily as forms of self-defense. Peyote, khat, coca, and opium are common examples of naturally occurring substances that, when ingested by humans, alter the way in which neurons interact, creating effects that vary from medicinal to toxic. An in depth analysis of the primary literature will be used to explore and analyze the wide range of biological effects induced by these compounds, as well as the biology of the organisms producing psychoactive substances. Prerequisite: Open to senior biology majors who have completed at least one 300-level course in the major or by permission of the instructor.
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  • BIOL 487: Sr Sem: Biol Impli Climate Change
    (Senior Seminar: Biological Implications of Climate Change) As our global climate changes, it is expected that the effects on biological systems will be wide-ranging. Changes in temperature, atmospheric CO2 concentrations, rainfall patterns, storm frequency and sea level have the potential to alter geographic distributions of species, change the spread of infectious diseases, reset plant phenologies, drive evolutionary change and even modify plant and animal physiology and biochemistry. An in depth analysis of primary literature will be used to explore and analyze the myriad biological effects that may occur in response to global climate change. Prerequisite: Open to senior biology majors who have completed at least one 300-level Biology course or by permission of instructor.
  • BIOL 488: Sr Sem: Cellular Basis of Disease
    (Senior Seminar: Cellular Basis of Disease) A study of the cellular and molecular basis of infectious diseases and their treatments, including viral and acterial agents, through intensive library research, report writing, and student presentations. Prerequisite: Open to senior biology and neuroscience majors who have completed at least one 300-level course in the major or by permission of the instructor.
    NEUR 488
  • BIOL 489: Sr Sem: Biology of War
    War can have devastating effects on human health and the environment. Factors considered in this course include nuclear fallout, widespread pesticide (e.g. Agent Orange), biological weapons, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, and natural resource availability. An analysis of primary literature will be used to explore and analyze the myriad biological effects of modern and historical warfare. Prerequisite: Open to senior biology and neuroscience majors who have completed at least one 300-level course in the major or by permission of the instructor.
    NEUR 489
  • BIOL 490: Internship
    Off-campus research experience supervised by a departmental faculty member. Consult the faculty member designated as the department's internship liaison for application information.
  • BIOL 493: Research Project
    Research in collaboration with a departmental faculty member. Consult with any member of the department for application information.
  • BIOL 494: Senior Thesis
    Research guided by a departmental faculty member culminating in a senior thesis, fulfilling the College's Senior Studies Requirement. Consult any member of the department for further information.

 

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  • BUSN 130: Applied Statistics
    Distribution analysis, sampling theory, statistical inference, and regression analysis, with emphasis on the application of statistical techniques using spreadsheet software to analyze economic and business issues. Students who have taken this course will not receive credit for MATH 150. Prerequisite or corequisite: ECON 129.
    ECON 130, FIN 130
  • BUSN 210: Managerial Economics
    Application of economic analysis to business decisions. It covers economic tools with applications to demand analysis, pricing policies, competitive strategy, cost analysis, and decision making. Prerequisites: ECON 110, either MATH 110 or MATH 160.
  • BUSN 225: Principles of Marketing
    Analysis of how marketing concepts impact an organization through the development of the marketing mix (product, price, place and promotion). Building upon these concepts, students will develop an understanding of how marketing managers develop specific strategies in order to gain competitive advantage in a global economy (formerly BUSN 345). No prerequisites.
    ENTP 225, IREL 213
  • BUSN 230: Financial Accounting
    Methods, practices, and concepts underlying the communication of relevant financial information to external parties. Development of the accounting model, measurement processes, data terminology and classification, internal control, interpretation and uses of financial statements. Prerequisites: ECON 110 and either MATH 110 or MATH 160, both with grades of C- or better.
  • BUSN 240: Chicago Business and Industry
    (Chicago Business and Industry: Growth, Change and Globalization.) This course is about the development of Chicago industry and the effects of on-going economic change and globalization on Chicago business. Business and industry are key elements to the success and wellbeing of urban America. Chicago is a case study in historic business transformation. The class will experience, evaluate and determine how business change works and the direction it can go. We will examine market needs as well as look at how Chicago history, cross-cultural roots and urban planning contribute to the process. We will also examine current Chicago businesses and institutions that contribute to and drive re-invention in a globalized world. No prerequisites.
  • BUSN 280: The Mexican-American Border
    As the only place where the third world and first world touch, the Mexican-American border is unique. This course will focus on the border and how its unique location in the world has created a culture, language, politics, religion and economy that reflect the interdependence between these two neighboring countries. The course will begin with the history of the border from the Gadsden Purchase in 1854 to the passage of NAFTA in 2004 and then examine the impact of free trade on Mexico. The course will explore how people (immigration - both legal and illegal), resources (oil, workers), consumer products (household appliances, food, music, and art), environmental waste (toxic waste, water and air pollution) and technology (outsourcing) cross borders as globalization impacts both Mexicans and Americans. The course involves a three-week stay along the border in May. Pre-requisites: ECON 110 and SPAN 112 or its equivalent. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    IREL 280, ECON 280, LNAM 280, SPAN 201
  • BUSN 310: International Marketing Research
    A study of methods related to quantitative and qualitative research in varied international business and global non-profit settings. The course emphasizes research in industrialized societies, global emerging markets, and developing economies. Coverage includes theoretical foundations and applications of research designs, data collection methods, and data analysis techniques. Learning experiences involve planning and implementing field research, case study analysis, and team presentations based on data collection experiences. Prerequisite: BUSN 225.
  • BUSN 315: Operations Management
    The course covers subjects related to the management process in a production system. The following topics are covered: design of products and services, quality control systems, capacity planning, process design, work analysis and measurement, facility location, and production scheduling. The inventory control system unit will discuss the relationship between inventory systems and other functions in an organization. Prerequisite: BUSN 230.
  • BUSN 320: Principles of Sales and Negotiation
    The course will present various theories and practices in sales and negotiation techniques, using applications from modern businesses. It will also discuss various management strategies used to develop and motivate a sales force, including departmental structures and retention incentives. Prerequisite: BUSN 225.
    ENTP 320
  • BUSN 322: Emerging Markets Analysis
    Analysis of emerging markets of East Asia and Latin America, paying particular attention to growth strategies and the impact of market reforms, financial markets development, and foreign capital flows on economic performance of these countries. The course relies on case studies from Asian countries of China, South Korea, Thailand, Singapore, and Hong Kong and Latin American economies of Brazil, Argentina, Mexico, and Chile. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.) Prerequisite: ECON 220.
    ASIA 322, LNAM 322, IREL 310
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  • BUSN 325: Advertising, Media and Digital Mark
    (Advertising, Media and Digital Marketing). The course will examine different types of marketing, advertising, and communication strategies presented through both traditional methods (such as television and print) and non-traditional methods (such as blogs and social networks). Digital marketing, social media and interactive marketing will be explored in the context of an overall integrated marketing campaign. Prerequisite: BUSN 225.
    ENTP 325
  • BUSN 330: Intermediate Accounting
    Accounting concepts, principles, and theory with an emphasis on the special problems that arise in applying these concepts to external reporting. Prerequisites: Business 230 with a grade of C- or better.
  • BUSN 331: Managerial Accounting
    Use of accounting information for evaluation of planning and control decisions. Topics include budgeting, cost-volume analysis, product costing, and standards for planning, control, and performance measurement. Prerequisite: Business 230 with a grade of C- or better.
  • BUSN 332: Auditing
    Exploration of issues related to internal and external auditing. This course examines auditing standards (Generally Accepted Auditing Standards), fraud detection, professional ethics, and recent changes to regulations (including US Securities laws). Prerequisites: ECON 129, BUSN 330.
  • BUSN 333: Cost Accounting
    Advanced topics in cost and managerial accounting. Topics include cost accumulation, cost behavior, break even analysis, capital budgeting, management control systems, cost allocation methods and performance measurement. Prerequisites: ECON 129 (Excel), BUSN 331.
  • BUSN 340: Chicago Business and Industry
    This course is about the development of Chicago industry and the effects of on-going economic change and globalization on Chicago business. Business and industry are key elements to the success and wellbeing of urban America. Chicago is a case study in historic business transformation. The class will experience, evaluate and determine how business change works and the direction it can go. We will examine market needs as well as look at how Chicago history, cross-cultural roots and urban planning contribute to the process. We will also examine current Chicago businesses and institutions that contribute to and drive re-invention in a globalized world. Not open to students who have completed BUSN 240. Prerequisite: ECON 110.
  • BUSN 341: Global Cultures & Intnl Bus-Chgo
    (Global Cultures and International Business Activities of Chicago) As influences of global activities increase locally, Chicago provides vast resources for the study of cultures, economic policies, political relations, and global business strategies. More than 130 consulates and foreign trade offices, and headquarters of many global companies, are in Chicago. This course will address the development and implications of various cultures in relation to local and global business activities. An emphasis will be field research, visits, and other activities involving Chicago-area resources. Instructional activities will include team projects, interviews, and observations to address issues related to Chicago's role in international trade and economic development for emerging markets. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.) Prerequisite: Junior standing, or permission of instructor.
    IREL 311
  • BUSN 342: African Culture & Business Develop
    (African Culture and Business Development.) While globalization can potentially enhance economic development and improve the quality of life, many nations, especially those in Africa, do not receive these benefits. Course emphasis will be on an analysis of efforts by businesses, community organizations, and government agencies to serve African societies plagued by poverty and other social concerns. Instructional resources will include: readings from sources with varied points of view; speakers representing countries and cultural groups; and field research visits to cultural exhibits and retail enterprises. Instructional experiences will include: (1) interviews with people familiar with various African cultures and business activities; (2) student team projects to analyze global cases for improvement of food production, water purification, health delivery, telecommunications, and educational programs and; (3) promotional activities to expand awareness of efforts to enhance economic development and quality of life in Africa. Prerequisite: Junior standing, or permission of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    IREL 312
  • BUSN 346: Entrepreneurial Marketing
    This project-based course focuses on marketing strategies that are relevant for new businesses or new product launches within a corporate setting. A broad overview of advertising development including account planning/research, the creative process, production, and media planning will be examined. Focus will be on print advertising, electronic media, digital interactive media, direct mail, and specialty advertising. Through the Entrepreneurial Marketing Analysis Project, students will have the opportunity to work with a local small business examining their current marketing and promotional strategies within the environment in which they are operating. Prerequisite: BUSN/ENTP 225 (formerly BUSN/ENTP 345).
    ENTP 346
  • BUSN 350: Capital Budgeting
    Study of advanced financial management and the evaluation of domestic and global business investment opportunities. Topics include the discounting of cash flows, foreign market risk analysis, capital asset pricing, and financial leverage decisions. Prerequisite: FIN 210.
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  • BUSN 360: Social Entrepreneurship
    Social entrepreneurship is a cross-cultural and interdisciplinary practice that combines traditional business and finance principles with expertise from fields as diverse as agriculture, medicine, law, engineering, environmental studies and sociology. The efforts of social entrepreneurs attempt to address problems such as poverty, hunger, disease, pollution, illiteracy, and inadequate housing in developing areas of Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The result of these efforts is often a new business model for improved economic development and enhanced quality of life in a particular cultural setting. Strategic partnerships contribute to the success of such social enterprises through connections with government, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), relief agencies, microfinance institutions, and human rights groups in varied cultural settings. This course prepares students for a changing business environment through cross-cultural and interdisciplinary assignments including field interviews, team projects, and student-created videos. Prerequisite: FIN 210. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ENTP 360, IREL 316
  • BUSN 430: Federal Tax Accounting
    Advanced discussion of tax issues relating to individual and corporate income taxation. Concepts for individual taxation include gross income, exclusions, deductions, exemptions, credits, as well as property transactions. Concepts for corporate income taxation include differing tax aspects of corporations and partnerships such as formation, operations and distributions. Prerequisite: BUSN 330.
  • BUSN 460: Brand Management and Positioning
    Designed for the marketing enthusiast, this course will dive deeply into the key marketing responsibilities necessary to build strong and profitable brands. Using both theory and practice, students will address the tasks that constitute modern marketing management, including: driving the company's mission, vision and strategic plan, capturing marketing insights and performance, connecting with customers, shaping marketing offerings, and delivering and communicating value. The course is designed to be highly interactive. Through case studies, presentations, problem-solving, and hands-on activities, students will have the opportunity to apply the concepts, ideas, and strategies presented in the text and in class in their weekly work. Prerequisite: BUSN 345. Not open to students who have completed BUSN 370.
  • BUSN 470: Latin American Global Business
    Emphasizes analytic activities and case problems for corporate and entrepreneurial organizations operating or considering operations in Latin America. Economic theories, statistical tests, accounting records, financial analysis, and marketing concepts will be used to investigate business situations. (May be taken by business and international relations majors to meet GEC Senior Studies Requirement. Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement if not used for GEC Senior Studies Requirement.) Prerequisites: BUSN 130 (or BUSN 180), BUSN 230, ECON 210, ECON 220, and FIN 210 (or FIN 237); or permission of instructor for Latin American Studies majors.
    LNAM 470
  • BUSN 471: Asian Bus Culture & Trade Relations
    Asian Business Culture and Trade Relations. As China, Singapore, South Korea, and Taiwan expand trade activities and increase their global influence, other Asian nations (Cambodia, Laos, Malaysia, Vietnam) continue to face economic hardships. This course will address geographic, historic, cultural, economic, and political factors that influence business opportunities, economic development, and quality of life in Asia. An emphasis will be on regional and global trade relations related to health care, infrastructure, food distribution, telecommunications, and education/job training. Instructional experiences will include field research involving Chicago-area resources along with analytic activities and case problems for business organizations operating or considering operations in Asia. (May be taken by business and Asian studies majors to meet GEC Senior Studies Requirement. Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement if not used for GEC Senior Studies Requirement.). Prerequisites: BUSN 130 (or BUSN 180), BUSN 230, ECON 210, ECON 220, and FIN 210 (or FIN 237); or permission of instructor for Asian Studies majors.
    ASIA 471
  • BUSN 489: Globalization and Its Impact
    Examines the impact of globalization on rich countries (the United States) and poor countries (Mexico, India, and China). An examination of free trade agreements will cast light on the political motives behind these agreements as well as the economic projections made. The economic impact of the creation of free trade zones is explored using both microeconomics and macroeconomics. Statistical evidence will document whether globalization has caused growth in GDP, employment, and income in poor countries. The responsibility of multinational companies in creating sweatshops, worker exploitation, and cultural disintegration are discussed in light of U.S. businesses located in Mexico, India, and China. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.) Prerequisites: ECON/BUSN 130 (or ECON/BUSN 180), ECON 210, and ECON 220.
    ECON 489
  • BUSN 490: Internship
    Provides an opportunity to supplement academic training with work experience in the field of business and economics. Interested students must work with Career Services to develop a resume and register with the instructor by the following deadlines: by April 1 for a Fall internship; by November 1 for a Spring internship; and by the week following spring break for a Summer internship. Business and Economics internships may be done for either one or two credits. Internships need to be for different experiences therefore continuation of previous internships, part-time or summer jobs is not allowed. The department will not give credit for internships that do not build directly on prior course work. Students on academic probation are ineligible for this program. Contact the Internship Supervisor for Economics and Business regarding additional information and guidelines.
    ECON 490, FIN 490

 

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  • CHEM 102: Chemistry and the Environment
    Explore chemical phenomena in the world around you. Learn about the chemical cycles present throughout nature. Understand the chemistry behind current environmental issues such as air pollution, ozone depletion, global warming, acid rain, and energy sources (fossil fuels, nuclear, renewable). The relevant scientific background will be developed as needed to explain these particular topics. Lectures, discussions, and demonstrations. Not applicable toward the major or minor.
  • CHEM 103: Our Chemical World
    This course is a descriptive examination of modern chemistry that will emphasize aspects important for students in the humanities and social sciences. Among the topics to be examined: the impact of science and technology on society; chemical change; nuclear chemistry; consumer chemistry; acids and bases; and plastics and polymers. Demonstrations and some experiments with group participation. Not applicable toward the major or minor.
  • CHEM 105: The Chemistry of Art
    This course will explore fundamental principles of chemistry and the scientific method through the lens of art. The course will introduce concepts necessary for an understanding of the electromagnetic spectrum; the chemical and physical principles that help to explain color; the chemical composition and interactions of atoms and molecules as they apply to pigments, dyes, binders, glazes, paper, fabrics, and metals; as well as the chemical changes active in processes like fresco painting, etching and photography. Building on a fundamental understanding of chemical and physical principles at work in the materials used to create art, the course will culminate with an exploration of case studies in the use of technology for art conservation and/or the detection of forgeries. The course format will include lecture, some short laboratory exercises, and a field trip. No prerequisites.
  • CHEM 107: Developing World Thirst for Energy
    This course will introduce the concepts behind the ever-increasing global demand for energy. Through laboratory experiments, field trips, and discussions of current events, students will develop an understanding of the many issues related to meeting the world's energy needs. In particular, the dramatic economic growth in China and India raise additional issues about sustainable energy generation in the face of global imbalances in the carbon cycle.
    ASIA 107
  • CHEM 108: Environmental Chemistry
    A working knowledge of most environmental issues facing us in the twenty-first century requires an understanding of some key geochemical principles. This course introduces chemistry concepts and skills as they arise in the context of current environmental issues, including chemical cycles in nature, air pollution, ozone depletion, global warming, acid rain, energy sources, water quality, and solid waste. Students will be asked to collect and interpret their own data, as well as to use simple models to explain environmental issues from a scientific perspective.
    ES 108
  • CHEM 109: Learning About the Physical World
    This course will examine selected topics in physical science such as the physical and chemical properties of matter, energy, motion of objects, waves and vibrations, components of the solar system and interactions of objects in the universe. This course is appropriate for students interested in strengthening their knowledge and confidence in investigating fundamental concepts and ideas in science. The course is designed with elementary education majors in mind to provide them with the necessary background for teaching science. Students will participate in lectures, discussions, projects, and laboratory activities. Two 80-minute class hours per week. Not applicable toward the chemistry major or minor.
    EDUC 109
  • CHEM 114: Foundations of Chemistry
    Foundations of Chemistry is designed to develop fundamental study skills along with a quantitative and conceptual understanding of chemistry. This course will emphasize stoichiometry, atomic and molecular structure, and solution chemistry principles. There is no laboratory component for this course and it does not count toward the chemistry major or minor. However, the course can serve as an entrance to the major or minor. The course is intended to be a skills-building and preparatory course for subsequent enrollment into Chemistry 115. Prerequisite: Completion of a science placement test to assess quantitative skills and, for non-first year students, permission of instructor.
  • CHEM 115: Chemistry I
    An introduction to and study of the fundamental concepts and principles of chemistry. Atomic and molecular structure, periodic relationships, chemical bonding, stoichiometry. Properties and theories of gases, liquids, and solids. Laboratory introduces quantitative measurements and computer applications. This course will meet admissions requirements for medical, dental, or pharmacy school. Three class meetings, one laboratory per week. Students must register for a lab. Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on the departmental placement test to assess quantitative skills or a passing grade in Chemistry 114. Please see Chemistry Department requirements page for details.
  • CHEM 116: Chemistry II
    Thermodynamics and kinetics; chemical equilibria; acids, bases, and buffers; coordination compounds; descriptive chemistry of metals and nonmetals. Laboratory is both quantitative and descriptive and uses much instrumentation. Three class meetings, one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 115.
  • CHEM 220: Org Chemistry I
    Introduction to functional groups; nomenclature; resonance; inductive and steric effects; stereochemistry; carbonyl chemistry; nature of organic reactions. Laboratory focuses on microscale synthetic techniques, gas chromatography, and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Three class meetings, one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 116 or permission of the instructor. Students must also register for a lab.
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  • CHEM 221: Org Chemistry II
    Addition, substitution, and elimination reactions; molecular rearrangements; aromaticity; carbohydrates and heterocyclic chemistry. Laboratory focuses on microscale organic synthesis, infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and GC/MS. Three class meetings, one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 220 or permission of the instructor.
  • CHEM 300: Biochemistry
    Introduction to biochemistry at the cellular and chemical levels. Emphasis on protein structure and function, enzymes, bioenergetics, intermediary metabolism, carbohydrates, and other biological molecules. Three class meetings, one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 221 and BIOL 120, or permission of the instructor. Students must also register for a lab.
  • CHEM 320: Physical Chem I
    Quantum mechanics and the nature of the chemical bond. Emphasis on understanding atomic orbitals, atomic and molecular energy, and the chemical bond. Applications of molecular quantum mechanics; spectroscopy and computational chemistry. Laboratory focuses on experiments that led to the development of quantum mechanics, molecular modeling, and spectroscopy. Three class meetings, one laboratory per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 221, MATH 111 or MATH 116; prerequisite or corequisite: PHYS 110 or PHYS 120. Students must also register for a lab.
  • CHEM 321: Physical Chem II
    The energy and dynamic behavior of groups of molecules. Emphasis on non-ideal gases, statistical mechanics, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, and reaction-rate theory. Laboratory focuses on kinetics and thermodynamics with a culminating independent project-based experience. Prerequisite or corequisite: PHYS 111 or PHYS 121.
  • CHEM 340: Inorganic Chemistry
    Relationship among structure, properties, and chemical reactivity of elements from the entire periodic table. Molecular bonding theories, molecular symmetry and group theory, solid-state materials, transition-metal complexes, catalysts, and bioinorganic molecules. Laboratory work includes synthesis, spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and inert-atmosphere techniques. Two class meetings and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 321.
  • CHEM 410: Instrumental Analysis
    Theory and techniques of instrumentation used in modern chemical analysis. Optical spectroscopy (UV-Vis, fluorescence, FT-IR, Raman), NMR, mass spectrometry, electroanalytical chemistry, and modern separation techniques (GC, HPLC, and electrophoresis). Laboratory experiments will include most modern instrumental methods and culminate in an independent project. Three class meetings, one laboratory per week. Satisfies the Senior Studies Requirement. Prerequisite (or corequisite with premission of the instructor): CHEM 320. Students must also register for a lab.
  • CHEM 415: Biochemistry
    Application of chemistry to biological molecules. Topics selected from the following: X-ray crystallography; NMR spectroscopy; molecular modeling; computational methods in biochemical systems; protein-DNA interactions; photobiophysics; enzyme catalysis and mechanisms; and DNA chemistry. Four class meetings, no laboratory. Prerequisites: CHEM 300 and CHEM 321, or permission of the instructor.
  • CHEM 430: Advanced Organic Chemistry
    Extended treatment of familiar topics of organic chemistry. Emphasis on stereochemistry, radical chemistry, and reactions used in modern organic synthesis. Laboratory is oriented toward synthesis, structural analysis, and the use of chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. Three class meetings, one laboratory per week. Prerequisites: Chemistry 221 and 321.
  • CHEM 493: Research Project
    Independent research guided by a faculty advisor. Research areas include organic synthesis; organometallic catalysis; enzyme inhibition; X-ray crystallography; computational chemistry; molecular modeling; solid state chemistry; and spectroscopic studies of air pollution.
  • CHEM 494: Senior Thesis
    An extensive, in-depth, independent research project with faculty guidance. Includes a formal written dissertation and oral presentation. Satisfies the Senior Studies Requirement.
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  • CHIN 108: Spoken Chinese for Travelers
    This course is a foundational course in oral proficiency that employs a new method designed to have students quickly speaking and comprehending Mandarin Chinese. This course introduces Mandarin Chinese pronunciation, the pinyin transcription system, and modern colloquial Chinese. The emphasis is only on oral proficiency. The Chinese writing system is not required in this course. Overall, Chinese for Travelers is designed for students who seek to advance rapidly in Chinese as well as prepare for upper-level language study. Particularly for those who aspire to travel abroad, the class offers basic and practical language-survival skills. Of course, the class is also geared to pique your interest in a beautiful land, culture, and people. No prerequisites.
    ASIA 108
  • CHIN 109: Chinese in the Business World
    The course is designed for students and working professionals who have no prior knowledge of Chinese, and are interested in conducting business in China. The objective of this course is to build a solid foundation of basic Chinese in the business context, with a focus on speaking and listening. Topics in the course cover basic daily corporate interactions and business-related social exchanges such as meeting people, introducing companies, making inquiries and appointments, visiting companies, introducing products, initiating dining invitations, etc. This course will also help you gain a better understanding of Chinese business culture, and assist you in overcoming the problems in cross-cultural communication from a comparative perspective. No prerequisite. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ASIA 109
  • CHIN 110: Beginning Chinese I
    This course is an introduction to the forms of spoken Chinese. Most of the fundamental structures are covered in Chinese 110 and 112, together with writing practice. 112 is a continuation of 110. Lab work is an integral part of the sequence.
    ASIA 110
  • CHIN 112: Beginning Chinese II
    This course is an introduction to the forms of spoken Chinese. Most of the fundamental structures are covered in Chinese 110 and 112, together with writing practice. 112 is a continuation of 110. Lab work is an integral part of the sequence. Prerequisite: CHIN 110 or equivalent.
    ASIA 112
  • CHIN 113: Basic Spoken Chinese
    (Basic Spoken Chinese: An Introduction to Speaking and Listening for Beginners.). Basic Spoken Chinese is a beginning-level course in oral proficiency that employs a new method designed to have students quickly speaking and comprehending Mandarin Chinese. This course introduces Mandarin Chinese pronunciation, the pinyin transcription system, and modern colloquial Chinese. The emphasis is only on oral proficiency. Learning the Chinese writing system is not required in this course. This course is designed for students who seek to advance rapidly in spoken Chinese. It is designed to prepare students for study abroad or to enhance their interest in China. CHIN 113 may not be taken concurrently or subsequently to CHIN110 or CHIN112. CHIN 210 may be taken after CHIN 113. No prerequisites.
    ASIA 114
  • CHIN 210: Intermediate Chinese
    This course will continue the fundamentals of Chinese conversation begun in the first-year series, Chinese 110 and 112, and continue work on reading and writing the language. Extensive oral practice and conversation exercises are stressed. Classes will be supplemented with laboratory exercises and written work. Prerequisite: CHIN 112 or equivalent.
    ASIA 210
  • CHIN 212: Advanced Intermediate Chinese
    This is the second course in intermediate Chinese. It focuses on further developments of the four language skills to support sustained oral and written performance at the intermediate level to prepare students for third year Chinese study. The focus will be on oral expression with expanding vocabulary, enhancing understanding of grammar, and introducing more complex structures and texts. Prerequisite: CHIN 210 or equivalent.
    ASIA 212
  • CHIN 230: East Asian Lit in Translation
    (East Asian Literature in Translation taught in English). This course is an introduction to traditional East Asian literature with the primary focus on China, Japan and Korea. It will concentrate on several themes, topics, authors and representative works of traditional Chinese, Japanese and Korean literature; emphasis on critical reading. This course will provide the students an opportunity to enjoy the most well known poems, novels and short stories produced by the prominent authors of the genres. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ASIA 230
  • CHIN 232: Chinese Cinema
    This course provides a historical, critical, and theoretical survey of Chinese cinema, broadly defined to include films from Mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. We will look at the specific political, social, economic, technological and aesthetic factors that have influenced the shape and character of Chinese cinema over the last century. We will discuss a range of works by internationally directors, including Zhang Yimou, Feng Xiaogang, Stephen Chow, Ang Lee, etc. As this course serves as a general introduction to Chinese film, it is intended for students who have little or no knowledge of China. All films screened for the course have English subtitles, so no knowledge of the Chinese language is required. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement).
    ASIA 232, CINE 232
  • CHIN 251: Intro to Chinese Literature in Engl
    (Introduction to Chinese Literature in English) This course will introduce students to Chinese literature through representative works of philosophy, poetry, folklore and modern short stories. The goal of this course is twofold: to grant students glimpses into the rich repertoire of Chinese literature and hence insights into the fundamental humanistic traditions of China; and to develop a set of skills of literary analysis. No knowledge of Chinese language or prior coursework on Chinese culture is required. Taught in English. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ASIA 251
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  • CHIN 260: Intro to Chinese Culture in English
    This course will explore elements of Contemporary Chinese culture and themes related to living, studying or working in China, as seen in films, videos, internet sources, and selected fiction and non-fiction texts. Topics covered include China's diverse geography, peoples and cuisine, doing business in China, the societal role of Chinese medicine, festivals and weddings, interpreting folk and contemporary art forms, current trends and themes in popular culture. This course will be taught in English. No prerequisite. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ASIA 260
  • CHIN 312: Chinese Oral & Written Proficiency
    This course is a continuation of Chinese 212. The focus will be on oral and written expression in cultural context, expanding vocabulary and enhancing understanding of Chinese grammar. Chinese idiomatic expressions and various aspects of Chinese culture will also be explored throughout the course. Prerequisite: CHIN 212 or equivalent. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ASIA 312
  • CHIN 313: Chinese for Int'l Affairs&Business
    (Chinese for International Affairs and Business). The course grounds students in real-world applications of political, economic and business/marketing concepts and terminology. The goal of this course is to develop students' Chinese language skills in a communicative political and business context while being aware of Chinese socio-cultural issues. It includes a concurrent emphasis on business terminology, conducting business negotiations, reading newspapers, magazines, and other business-related documents, discussing news and current events, and understanding economic trends and situations in modern China. Particularly recommended for students who are thinking of careers in economics, business, politics, and international relations. Prerequisite: CHIN 212 or equivalent.
    ASIA 313

 

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  • CINE 175: Introduction to Film Studies
    This course addresses basic topics in cinema studies, including: cinema technique, film production style, the basic language of film criticism, genres of cinema, movements from the history of cinema, and film criticism. Many topics are addressed through careful analysis of particularly important and representative films and directors. No prerequisites.
    AMER 175
  • CINE 185: Film and Religion
    Viewing films as meaningful texts, this course examines the perspectives offered by Asian and American filmmakers on such religious questions as: What does it mean to be human? How does death inform the living of life? How do values shape relationships? What is community and how is it created? What is ethical behavior? The range of films explored here function as vehicles for entering religious worldviews, communicating societal values, and probing different responses to the question of how to live a meaningful life. No prerequisites. Intended for first-year students and sophomores. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)

    RELG 185, ASIA 185
  • CINE 201: Digital Filmmaking
    This course gives students experience in narrative film production through use of practical projects. The course also provides an understanding of the basic terms and elements of narrative films. Students are introduced to the preproduction, production and post-production steps of narrative filmmaking while they explore the fundamentals of narrative film structure and production. Prerequisite: CINE 175.
  • CINE 230: Exploring French Lit thru Film
    (Exploring French Literature through Film) This course, taught in English (with an option for French majors to complete reading and writing in French), will examine French literary works, both historical and contemporary, through a variety of cinematic examples taken from French films. This course will compare the expression of theme, character, and plot structure in written literature (plays and narratives) and in corresponding cinematic adaptations. The course will also address whether the author's literary style is reflected in or displaced by the cinematic style of French 'auteurs' (film directors) studied. The question of translation across genres (literature to film), across language and culture (example of American remakes), and across history (a historical period depicted in a modern cinematic era) will also be discussed. No prerequisite. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement. )
    FREN 230
  • CINE 231: French Culture through Film
    (Exploring French Culture through Film) This course, taught in English, examines contemporary French cultural perceptions through a variety of cinematic examples taken from French films. Cultural analysis will include discussions of French history, literature, politics, geography, and music. In addition, the topic of 'remaking culture' through film is addressed, as the current wave of cinematic remakes invites cross-cultural comparisons between the United States and France. The course will examine major French directors and their cinematic portrayals of the French, as well as documentaries and filmed interviews, and will analyze the 'authenticity' of the portrait they produce of French society. Prerequisite: FREN 212 or equivalent. Not open to students who have completed FREN 338: Cinema Francais. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    FREN 231
  • CINE 232: Chinese Cinema
    This course provides a historical, critical, and theoretical survey of Chinese cinema, broadly defined to include films from Mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. We will look at the specific political, social, economic, technological and aesthetic factors that have influenced the shape and character of Chinese cinema over the last century. We will discuss a range of works by internationally directors, including Zhang Yimou, Feng Xiaogang, Stephen Chow, Ang Lee, etc. As this course serves as a general introduction to Chinese film, it is intended for students who have little or no knowledge of China. All films screened for the course have English subtitles, so no knowledge of the Chinese language is required. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement).
    CHIN 232, ASIA 232
  • CINE 236: Latin American Film
    Taught in English. An interdisciplinary study of Latin American film, from multiple perspectives: artistic, historical, political, and socio-economic. This course will highlight the artistic achievements of Latin American filmmakers from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico. We will use selected readings from original works for films that are based on fiction. A number of films have been Academy Award nominees or winners. Further readings will include a history of Latin American cinema, movie reviews, and interviews with directors. The course will scrutinize the links among cultural phenomena, socio-political events, and the art of filmmaking. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    SPAN 236, LNAM 236
  • CINE 240: Shakespeare on Film
    This course will focus on major cinematic adaptations of Shakespeare's plays, with attention both to the original texts and to the process of transferring them to the new medium by film directors. We will pay special attention to plays that have been filmed a number of times, so that we can develop useful comparisons: Richard III (Olivier, Loncraine), Romeo and Juliet (Zeffirelli, Luhrmann, Shakespeare in Love), Henry V (Olivier, Branagh), Hamlet (Olivier, Zeffirelli, Almereyda), and Macbeth (Polanski, Kurzel). Major goals will be to develop our ability to do close readings of both the original texts and the films, to do creative film adaptation projects, and to develop effective ways of expressing both our analytical and our creative ideas. No prerequisites.
    THTR 240, ENGL 239
  • CINE 255: Philosophy and European Film
    This course explores the philosophical content of contemporary European movies with special emphasis on metaphysical, ethical, and aesthetic ideas developed and visually presented by recognized filmmakers including Ingmar Bergman, Akira Kurosawa, Satyajit Ray, Luis Bunuel, Francois Truffaut, DeSica, Erich Rohmer, Fellini, and Antonioni, and special emphasis on Krzysztof Kieslowski.
    PHIL 255
  • CINE 258: Spike Lee and Black Aesthetics
    As one of the greatest filmmakers of all time, Spike Lee is both loathed and loved. His films challenge the stereotypes and paternalistic assumptions about African Americans that have become sacrosanct in America's popular imagination. We will explore how the aesthetic representation of race, class, and gender in Spike Lee's filmography have helped create a new genre of film called African American noir. In so doing, we will watch several of Spike Lee's films, documentary projects, and television ads. Ultimately, our goal will be to appreciate Lee's cinematic technique, examine his critique of white supremacy, and consider the cultural and historical events that have shaped his artistic vision. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    PHIL 258, AFAM 258
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  • CINE 266: Music in Film
    Music has played an important part of the movie-going experience since the beginnings of the film industry in the 1890's, and the blending of music and drama has deeper roots still. This course charts the development of music and sound in film, from these deep roots through the mis-named silent-movie era and on to the great film composers of the twentieth century and today. Students will learn the fundamental elements of a film score, investigate how a film composer works, and develop a vocabulary for describing and assessing film music. No prior knowledge of music or film history is necessary.
    MUSC 266, AMER 266
  • CINE 301: Romantic Comedies & Phil of Love
    (Romantic Comedies and Philosophy of Love) Why do we like to watch romantic comedies? What's satisfying about them, even when they're not great films? Film theorist Leo Braudy claimed that 'genre [film] ? always involves a complex relation between the compulsions of the past and the freedoms of the present. ? [They] affect their audience ? by their ability to express the warring traditions in society and the social importance of understanding convention.' In this course, following Braudy, we will investigate the relationship between the film genre of romantic comedy and age-old thinking about love, marriage, and romance. We'll read some ancient and modern philosophy of love, as well as some relevant film theory, and watch and discuss an array of romantic comedies, trying to unpack what we really believe about love. Prerequisite: One Philosophy course or permission of the instructor. ('Genre: The Conventions of Connection,' Film Theory and Criticism, eds. Leo Braudy and Marshall Cohen. New York: Oxford U. Press, 538).
    PHIL 301, GSWS 301
  • CINE 302: Philos Issues in Documentary Film
    (Philosophical Issues in Documentary Film) What is a documentary film? What does it mean for a movie to be 'non-fiction'? In this course, we will view and discuss a number of documentary films, e.g., those of Robert Flaherty, Leni Riefenstahl, Claude Lanzmann, Albert Maysles, Erroll Morris, and Seth Gordon. We'll also read some aesthetic and film theory, to try to understand what about these films is and is not 'true,' 'good' or 'beautiful.' Prerequisite: One Philosophy course or permission of the instructor.
    PHIL 302
  • CINE 336: Modern German Film
    In our overview of German film from its inception to the opening of the 21st century, students examine and discuss famous as well as off-beat masterpieces of cinema from the perspectives of political and cultural history as well as specifically cinematic aesthetics. The course views and debates films (subtitled in English) by such noted filmmakers as Lang, Fassbinder, Herzog, Schlöndorff, Wenders, Holland, Verhoeven and Fatih Akin. Readings, lectures, and discussions are in English, and the course encourages comparisons with films from other cultures, including popular Hollywood cinema. Prerequisite: a course that develops analytic-interpretive skills, such as, but not limited to: ENGL 210, ENGL 211, ENGL 212, ENGL 216, ENGL 217, COMM 255, or COMM 275; or permission of instructor. (Offered as a Tutorial.)
    GERM 333
  • CINE 337: Cine e Historia en América Latina
    The course examines the ways that movies view historical events and periods, while at the same time shaping public perception of those events and periods in Latin America. Examples of topics are the Conquest of the Americas, the legacy of Peron, the Castro and post-Castro eras in Cuba, the Catholic Church in Mexico, dictatorship and democracy in Brazil and Chile, and narco-trafficking. The basic format will be discussion with occasional interactive lectures. Readings will include essays on cinema and history. Students will view films mostly in DVD format from several countries. Assignments will include short essays, oral presentations, and a midterm and a final exam. (Counts toward the Spanish major and minor. Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    SPAN 333, LNAM 333
  • CINE 338: Cinema Francais
    This interdisciplinary course provides an overview of French cinematic history, with an emphasis on how French films and movements represent various social and political concerns of their time period. Film will be studied as an art form and cultural text to be interpreted, and films by major directors will illustrate key cinematic concepts and themes. Readings will address the socio-political context, from French film beginnings to the complexity of post-colonial French identity and cultural globalization depicted in contemporary French and Francophone films. This course is discussion-based,with occasional lectures, is taught in French, and will acquaint students with cinematic terms used to interpret the genre. Prerequisite: FREN212 or equivalent. Not open to students who have completed FREN 333: French Culture Through Film in English. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement.)
    FREN 338
  • CINE 339: Cine Español
    An interdisciplinary study of Spanish film, from multiple perspectives: artistic, historical, political, and socio-economic. This course will highlight the artistic achievements of Spanish filmmakers from several periods, including Luis Buñuel, Carlos Saura, and Pedro Almodovar. Readings will include essays on film history, the language of cinema, movie reviews, and interviews with directors. The course will scrutinize the links among cultural phenomena, socio-political events, and the art of filmmaking. Films will be treated as complex aesthetic objects whose language does not merely photograph socio-historical reality but transfigures it. The course will also consider Spain in its broadest Iberian sense and will include films in Catalan, Galician, and Portuguese. Classes will be based mainly on discussion interspersed with occasional lectures. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    SPAN 334, LNAM 334
  • CINE 341: Cine Latinoamericano
    An interdisciplinary study of Latin American film, from multiple perspectives: artistic, historical, political, and socio-economic. This course will highlight the artistic achievements of Latin American filmmakers from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico. We will use selected readings from original works for films that are based on fiction. A number of films have been Academy Award nominees or winners. Further readings will include a history of Latin American cinema, movie reviews, and interviews with directors. The course will scrutinize the links among cultural phenomena, socio-political events, and the art of filmmaking. Films will be treated as complex aesthetic objects whose language does not merely photograph socio-historical reality but transfigures it. Classes will be based mainly on discussion interspersed with occasional lectures. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    SPAN 338, LNAM 338
  • CINE 343: Video Art
    This course combines digital video production techniques with a seminar-style investigation into the use of film and video as an art form. Students will use Final Cut Studio software in a Mac-platform computer lab to produce several independent and collaborative creative video projects addressing ideas crucial to the development of video art, and pertinent to our current connections to technology and life, communication and entertainment. Students will become familiar with common themes, tools and techniques utilized in this changing, but nonetheless historically grounded medium as they find their own creative voices and engage the rapidly growing community of digital video producers and consumers. Prerequisite: ART 130 or ART 142 or both COMM 112 and COMM 275.
    ART 343
  • CINE 360: History and the Moving Image
    This course explores the role of moving images (film, television, internet) in understanding history as both collective process and contested interpretation. The course will integrate a discussion of recent historical methodologies concerning moving images, with examples from a variety of forms, including historical epics, documentaries, propaganda, television series, literary adaptations, and biographies. Special emphasis will be placed upon the ambiguities of historical context, including the time of production, the period depicted, and changing audiences over time. Topics include: 'Feudal Codes of Conduct in Democratic Societies,' 'Film as Foundation Myth for Totalitarian Ideologies' and 'Situation Comedy of the 1970s as Social History.' Prerequisite: Two history courses or permission of the instructor.
    HIST 360, AMER 340
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  • CINE 370: Film Editing Theories and Practice
    This course focuses on different theories and approaches in film editing. It examines the techniques and aesthetic principles of editing of various filmmakers in film history. This class also provides practical experiences for students, who are assigned creative video editing projects. Prerequisite: CINE 175.
  • CINE 376: Queer Cinema
    This course will focus on queer cinema--films that not only challenge prevailing sexual norms, but also seek to undermine the categories of gender and sex. Gender and sexual norms are perpetuated and challenged through notions of visibility, a key tactic in the fight for societal acceptance and civil rights. How sexuality is made visible and invisible will serve as a central focus in our analysis of queer film and media, focusing primarily on explicit representations of GLBTQ characters. Through feminist and queer theory, film theory and cultural criticism, we will analyze the contested relationships between spectators and texts, identity and commodities, realism and fantasy, activism and entertainment, desire and politics. Prerequisite: COMM 255, COMM 275, or permission of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    COMM 376, GSWS 376
  • CINE 380: Cine, Literatura y Sociedad Amr Lat
    (Cine, Literatura y Sociedad América Latina ) This course is an interdisciplinary study of Latin American societies, focusing on film and literature from multiple perspectives: artistic, historical, political, and socio-economic. The seminar will highlight the magisterial artistic achievements of Latin American novelists, short story writers, and playwrights and film adaptations of their works. It will scrutinize the links between socio-political events and artistic production. Seminar materials will include films, chapters from novels, short stories, plays, and readings on film, social issues, and politics. The basic format will be discussion with occasional interactive lectures. Assignments will include short essays, oral presentations, and a final exam. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    SPAN 380, LNAM 380
  • CINE 381: The Movies of Wilder and Hitchcock
    ("How Beautifully Made": The Movies of Billy Wilder and Alfred Hitchcock.) In June 1960, Alfred Hitchcock sent this letter to Billy Wilder: "I saw THE APARTMENT the other day. I cannot tell you how much I enjoyed it and how beautifully made. I felt this so much that I was impelled to drop you this note." Two meticulous directors with dark senses of humor and interest in the darker sides of the human psyche, Wilder and Hitchcock will help us understand how great movies are made. In this course we will watch, read about, and discuss several of each director's best movies, comparing and contrasting as we go. No prerequisites.
  • CINE 382: Reel Journalism: Hollywood & News
    (Reel Journalism: Hollywood and the Newsroom.) The news media has been a popular subject for Hollywood since the inception of filmmaking. Whether it's the story pursued by journalists or reporters' own narratives, movies such as Citizen Kane, All The President's Men, Good Night & Good Luck, and, most recently, Spotlight won awards, entertained millions, and grossed millions more at the box office. In this course, we observe how ethical standards are portrayed on the big screen and explore filmmaking techniques.and metaphors. Students also will gain perspectives of important U.S. history that continue to be relative in current events. No prerequisites.

 

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  • CLAS 210: Ancient Greece
    Greek civilization from the first awakening of reason in Homeric poetry and early philosophy to the spread throughout the Mediterranean world of a civilization of headlong, revolutionary innovation in every department of life and thought. Key episodes of the intellectual, political, and military history of the Greeks examined through examples of their literature and thought.
    HIST 240
  • CLAS 211: Roman History
    This course examines the history of Italy and the Mediterranean world during the thousand-plus years of Roman rule. We begin with Rome's establishment as a small city-state, as recorded in both legend and archaeological evidence. We chart Rome's political development and imperial expansion under the republic, study the career of Augustus and the revolution by which he transformed Rome into an empire, and conclude with that empire's fragmentation into the Byzantine, Latin Christian, and Islamic worlds. The topics studied will include: key political institutions and leaders; war, imperialism, and their consequences, including slavery and social unrest; the work of authors such as Cicero, Vergil, Seneca, and Marcus Aurelius; the varied Roman religious scene and the rise of Christianity and Islam; Roman social history, including class, marriage, and slavery. Students will work extensively with primary documents in translation.
    HIST 204
  • CLAS 250: Classical Rhetorical Tradition
    This course is an historical survey of theorizing about the role of public discourse in human affairs from ancient Greece and Rome. We consider how the functions and nature of public discourse is understood, whether its skillful use can be taught, and the relationship between public argument and reaching social consensus about issues of truth and ethics. We will apply these ancient concepts to contemporary ideas in order to explore how concepts from different periods in time can aid us in evaluating contemporary persuasive messages in public life.
    COMM 250
  • CLAS 275: Greek Greats
    Students will read canonical works at the core of classical Greek civilization and situate the imaginative appropriation of this rich literature in a cultural context that is both historical and contemporary. Students read Homer's epic Iliad (selections) and Odyssey (in its entirety), three plays each by the tragedians Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, two works of the satirical Aristophanes, and examples of lyric poetry ranging from Archaic to Hellenistic times. Immersion in primary sources provides ample historical perspectives as well as critical approaches to issues of our time. The course involves lectures but is principally a seminar. Ancient Greek drama and theater will be investigated utilizing film and interactive Web-based media and sources. Prerequisites: second-year standing and a Lake Forest College literature course, or permission of the instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • CLAS 280: Cultivating Ancient Worlds
    This course is a multi- and interdisciplinary undertaking, highlighting our two primary means of engaging the cultures of antiquity: the primary texts of literature and collections of artifacts in museums. Civilizations treated: Mesopotamia (Sumerian, Akkadian, Assyrian, Babylonian), Egypt, Persia, Greece, and China. Texts include everything from formulaic phrases, ritual incantation, epigraphy, and diplomatic reports to lyric poetry, philosophic dialogues, and vast epic narrative. We will read and discuss texts, and visit major collections in Chicago. Prerequisite: second-year standing.
  • CLAS 290: Ancient Greek Philosophy
    The nature of reality, knowledge, goodness, and beauty traced from the pre-Socratics through Plato and Aristotle. Some attention may be given to the transition to the medieval period.
    PHIL 290
  • CLAS 302: Greek and Roman Religion
    (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)

 

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  • CWR 100: College Writing
    Designed to enhance students' reading, writing, and reasoning strategies - and to build their confidence and enjoyment in college writing - this course requires critical response, careful analysis, and research-based argument. Through critical engagement with texts and writing processes, students will learn how to construct arguments to meet the challenges of academic and professional writing. This course is designed to improve students' writing habits, reduce anxiety associated with writing, and improve overall academic performance. (Does not meet GEC Humanitites Requirement.)

 

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  • COMM 110: Introduction to Communication
    Communication is a word that encompasses a wide range of human activity. This course will introduce students to: the over-arching theoretical considerations that define the field of communication, fundamental questions about how best to go about the practice of communication inquiry, keystone works in the history of the field of communication, and philosophical considerations that undergird the contemporary study of communication. The course is dedicated to the two animating themes in Lake Forest College's Department of Communication: media studies and rhetoric. Readings, written assignments, and class discussion will involve these two themes and the numerous points of contact between them.
  • COMM 112: Intro to Visual Communication
    This course examines forms of visual communication outside the traditional fine arts of painting and sculpture. It will concentrate primarily on the history and theory of graphic design, advertising, and propaganda, with consideration of both static and moving images.
  • COMM 120: Intro to Journalism
    Introduction to Journalism presents students with the skills and information that are essential for reliable, accurate, and independent news reporting. This course addresses the fundamental skills associated with journalistic writing, and presents students with the essential issues facing journalism today. In addition to writing, this course addresses the laws, ethics, and fundamentals of news literacy, with a keen focus on the critical thinking skills required for news judgment.
  • COMM 135: Rhetoric and Speech
    Preparation and criticism of both formal and informal public speeches, including exposition, narration, description, argumentation, and persuasion.
  • COMM 212: Visual Rhetoric
    We are surrounded by visual communication in our daily lives, yet the ubiquity of visual imagery makes it difficult for us to critically evaluate the images we see. In this course we will approach visual artifacts as texts, paying particular attention to their relationship to the political, social, and economic climate in which they reside. Throughout the semester we will develop a lexicon of visual terms, engage a variety of visual texts, such as monuments, advertisements, photography, typography, and architecture, and practice evaluating visual arguments. Not open to students who have already completed COMM 112 or COMM 370.
  • COMM 250: Classical Rhetorical Tradition
    This course is an historical survey of theorizing about the role of public discourse in human affairs from ancient Greece and Rome. We consider how the functions and nature of public discourse is understood, whether its skillful use can be taught, and the relationship between public argument and reaching social consensus about issues of truth and ethics. We will apply these ancient concepts to contemporary ideas in order to explore how concepts from different periods in time can aid us in evaluating contemporary persuasive messages in public life.
    CLAS 250
  • COMM 251: Rhetorical History of the U.S.
    A historical survey of rhetorical artifacts focusing on how interested parties use discourse to establish, maintain or revive power. (Cross-listed as American Studies 251.)
    AMER 251
  • COMM 253: Argumentation and Advocacy
    This course offers an introduction to the theory and practice of argumentation. We will consider how arguments are created, presented, reframed, and refuted in contexts ranging from interpersonal disagreements to public controversies. In order to recognize how different strategies of argumentation change depending on the context, we will explore the important public dimension of argumentation and advocacy, recognizing skill in advocacy as a fundamental element of effective democracy.
  • COMM 255: Communication Criticism
    In this course we consider how texts work rhetorically to persuade audiences. The course introduces students to the fundamental concepts and tools for describing, analyzing, interpreting and evaluating a variety of forms of persuasive discourse communicated through different media. Communication Criticism is designed to provide students with knowledge about the nature, function and effects of persuasive communication, as well as to develop the skills necessary to produce analytical critiques of public discourse. Prerequisite: COMM 110 with a grade of C or better.
  • COMM 256: Communication Research Methods
    This course presents students with a wide variety of qualitative and quantitative research methods for doing research in communication, in scholarly and professional contexts. In the course of a semester, this course covers the philosophical rationales undergirding these varied research approaches. With this established, the course gives students a hands-on sense of communication research methods, including: survey research, content analysis, experimental approaches, interviewing, discourse analysis, field research, and historical methods. The course will at all times involve careful attention to how the field of communication requires a heightened sense of circumspection regarding its own methods of study. Prerequisite: Comm 255 or consent of the instructor.
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  • COMM 268: Integrating Mkting W/ Journalism
    This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the holistic marketing communications approach that focuses on presenting a consistent message using complimentary media including print journalism, broadcast journalism and advertising journalism. Students will develop a basic understanding of print journalism, broadcast journalism and advertising journalism in respect to their role within the communication process. Marketing communication tools that will be examined include advertising, direct marketing, interactive/internet marketing, sales promotion, publicity/public relations and personal selling. The course will also cover legal and ethical issues involved with marketing communications and journalism.
    BUSN 268
  • COMM 274: Visual Chicago
    This course is a special adaptation of COMM 212: Visual Rhetoric to be taught in the College's "In the Loop" program. In this course we will approach visual artifacts as texts, paying particular attention to their relationship to the political, social, and economic climate in which they reside. Throughout the semester we will develop a lexicon of visual terms, engage a variety of visual texts, such as monuments, advertisements, photography, typography, and architecture, and practice evaluating visual arguments. What makes this course different from COMM 212 is that our visual texts and assignments will focus on Chicago based visual artifacts. Not open to students who have already completed COMM 112, COMM 212, or COMM 370. No prerequisites:
  • COMM 281: Theories of Mass Communication
    In this course, we examine the major theories and social critiques developed in response to systems of mass media and communication, including film, radio, television, and a national press. These theories and critiques range in concern from the democratic potential of mass media, to their role in manufacturing and mediating cultural values. Students engage with the major schools of thought that have become the foundation for contemporary mass communication and media research, including: early sociological approaches to communication theory, the strong and limited media effects traditions, the technology-oriented theories of the Canadian School, the Frankfurt School, British Cultural Studies, and American Cultural Studies. Students examine how definitions of mass media and communication have changed over time, and how these concepts continue to evolve alongside our interactions with modern media and communication technologies.
  • COMM 283: Race, Class, Gender, and the Media
    Race, class, and gender occupy important places in the contemporary study of the media. This course explores the connections between race, class, and gender through the exploration of the intersections between these important components of social structure and ideology. The motivating goal in this course is to show students how social structure and meaning become intertwined elements in how we experience race, class, and gender. An important element in this course will be the emphasis on the identities and positions of relatively less empowered groups in contemporary society. This will be done through a focused consideration of structural and ideological elements of contemporary culture as found in: the media industry, journalism, social constructions of reality, music, film, television, radio, and the internet. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • COMM 285: Modern Media History
    This course provides a broad overview of the history of the media of communication. This is done through use of a chronological treatment of: face-to-face communication, writing, printing, telegraphy, telephony, motion pictures, radio, television, and the internet. Though the course begins with a review of ancient communication media, the focus here is placed on the media in Western society from the 19th through the 21st centuries. The most important goal in this course is to consider how media of communication relate to: culture, social structure, the economy, politics, and knowledge.
  • COMM 287: Media Systems and Institutions
    Behind our favorite movies, TV programs, websites, and songs exist powerful media institutions. Disney, Fox, Warner Brothers, Google, and Apple are just a few of the media industry giants upon which we have grown increasingly dependent for our everyday entertainment and information needs. In this course we examine these media institutions, including their historical development, organizational structure, and methods of production and distribution. We also analyze and compare the various types of media systems that exist in the U.S. and worldwide, including commercial, public, and state-controlled media models. Finally, we consider the issues of globalization and digital convergence, and the ways these phenomena are changing the organization and function of modern media industries.
  • COMM 320: Advanced Journalism
    Though we have recently seen dramatic changes in how news consumers receive their news, what has not changed is the need for solid reporting and writing skills. This course gives students the opportunity to learn the intricacies of specific types of journalistic writing, including news, feature, sport, investigative/in-depth, opinion and review writing. Advanced Journalism also introduces students to techniques relating to journalistic style and editing. Using the fundamentals taught in Introduction to Journalism (Communication 120), students in Advanced Journalism write stories and opinion pieces to be used in the editorial production of student media at Lake Forest College. Prerequisite: Comm 120.
  • COMM 350: Topics in Communication
    Intensive study of selected subjects within the field of communications. Topics vary by semester. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement, depending on topic.)

  • COMM 370: Visual Rhetoric
    Although much of the rhetorical tradition focuses on how speech and writing persuade audiences, visual elements continue to be important. In this course students will develop a strong understanding of visual rhetorical theories and the ways these theories guide critical interpretation of visual texts. Through an analysis of a diverse set of communication media--including photographs, television programs, advertisements, political campaigns, museums, and monuments - we will consider the ways that visual texts move individuals, communities, and publics to rhetorical action. Prerequisite: COMM 255 or permission of instructor.
  • COMM 372: Rhetoric of Economics & the Market
    In this course we consider the relationship between rhetorical discourse and economics. Do economists merely present empirical conclusions or do they use the techniques of persuasion to create both disciplinary and public understandings of their subject? Is the free market an 'invisible hand' that works to stabilize society or is it a construct of persuasive discourse? Finally we will examine the value of public deliberation regarding complex economic policies. Prerequisite: COMM 255 or permission of instructor.
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  • COMM 373: Cultural Theory and Media Studies
    In this course students examine a variety of advanced communication theories now current in the field of communication studies, including reception theory, Marxist materialism, political economy, public sphere theory, ritual theory, technological approaches, and production of culture theory. A central goal of this course is to help students contextualize and critique political, social, and economic constructions of culture. Prerequisite: Comm 255, or another 200-level Communication course approved by the Department Chair, or consent of the instructor.
  • COMM 374: Rhetorical Chicago
    The Second City, the City with Big Shoulders, The Windy City, City in the Garden, Hog Butcher to the World, the City that Works: these are just some of the nicknames for the City of Chicago. This seminar examines the City of Chicago as both the site and source of rhetoric by using rhetorical theory and skills to explore art, architecture, geography, emblems, music, theater, sports, holidays, politics, media, museums, controversies and important rhetorical events including William Jennings Bryan's 1896 Cross of Gold speech, FDR's 1932 nomination acceptance, and Obama's 2008 victory speech. This course takes advantage of Lake Forest College's proximity to the City of Chicago in order to explore two key concepts in communication: the discursive construction of place and the impact of place on rhetoric. Prerequisite: Comm 255 or permission of instructor
  • COMM 375: Documentary Production
    This course will emphasize the power of documentaries and their potential to address issues of social significance. Specifically we will integrate critical viewings with practical documentary production. This course covers the aesthetic and technical fundamentals of producing documentaries. It provides working tools to plan and make arguments creatively, collaboratively, and artistically. The goal is to gain experience in video production while learning about the history and theory of documentary film and video.
  • COMM 376: Queer Cinema
    This course will focus on queer cinema--films that not only challenge prevailing sexual norms, but also seek to undermine the categories of gender and sex. Gender and sexual norms are perpetuated and challenged through notions of visibility, a key tactic in the fight for societal acceptance and civil rights. How sexuality is made visible and invisible will serve as a central focus in our analysis of queer film and media, focusing primarily on explicit representations of GLBTQ characters. Through feminist and queer theory, film theory and cultural criticism, we will analyze the contested relationships between spectators and texts, identity and commodities, realism and fantasy, activism and entertainment, desire and politics. Prerequisite: COMM 255, COMM 275, or permission of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    GSWS 376, CINE 376
  • COMM 380: Black Cinema
    Black Cinema addresses a range of periods and movements in Black Cinema: the Los Angeles School (for example Haile Gerima), Blaxploitation and its critics, Women directors (Leslie Harris, Julie Dash, Yvonne Welbon, Kasi Lemmons) critiques of Hollywood (ex: Robert Townsend's Hollywood Shuffle) and a unit on Spike Lee. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    AFAM 380
  • COMM 381: Hist & Theory Freedom of Expression
    (History and Theory of Freedom of Expression) This course explores the origins of the concept of free expression and draws out the varying philosophical assumptions that influence the discussion of free expression in the contemporary world. The course compares and contrasts classical liberal and romantic theories of expression. We examine both philosophies as they are reflected in historical examples of debates concerning freedom of expression, with a special emphasis on freedom of the press, but also addressing issues related to censorship, propaganda, pornography, and hate speech. The course culminates with a consideration of how arguments about freedom of expression come to rely on the precepts of these philosophies. Prerequisite: Comm 255, or Jour 320, or consent of instructor.
  • COMM 382: Women's Rhet & Feminist Critique
    Traces the development of women's oratorical tradition and the feminist critique by looking at how U.S. women argued for the right to speak before they had the vote and then how they continue arguing for equality once the right to suffrage had been established. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    GSWS 382
  • COMM 383: New Media & Society
    This course offers students a wide array of theoretical lenses for understanding what is often called 'the information society.' The course begins with a sustained consideration of the utopian myths associated with novelty as it relates to technology. After this, the focus moves to different ways to understand how new media (always a treacherous term) relate to: the public and political engagement, journalism, interpersonal communication, popular culture, the forces of political economy, surveillance, consumption, and religion. Prerequisite: Comm 255, or another 200-level Communication course approved by the Department Chair, or consent of the instructor.
  • COMM 384: Rhetorical Presidency:2016 Election
    Examines the rhetorical nature of the office of the President of the United States. Prerequisite: Comm 255, or another 200-level Communication course approved by the Department Chair, or consent of the instructor.
    AMER 384
  • COMM 385: The Public Sphere
    In this course we take up the issue of the 'public sphere' to consider its value and operation in modern society. The classic public sphere concerned public debate that took place in small coffeehouses where locals would meet to discuss the issues of the day. Now, public debate can be found strewn across the media: in entertainment, theater, music, art, schools, and of course in journalism. The course is framed by key questions such as: What counts as 'public' and 'private'? What is the role of the public? What voices are excluded in the public sphere? What are the best ways to be public? What role do journalism, photography, film, literature, and sports have in a public sphere? Prerequisite: Comm 255 or Jour 320 or by permission of instructor.
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  • COMM 386: Reading Popular Culture:Television
    Focusing on how culturally we are both producers and products of our popular culture we will try to answer the question: 'are we, as a culture, using the potential of television wisely'?
    AMER 386
  • COMM 387: Rhetoric of Law
    This course will introduce students to the idea that the US legal system is rhetorical in that it shapes and is shaped by discourse. We will begin by considering what is rhetorical about the law and will then focus our attention on the rhetorical effects of legal discourse. Bearing in mind that the law is particularly performative- that is, it has the power to produce the effects that it names- we will consider the role that the actual language of the law plays in doing the work of the law. We will examine a variety of legal texts and contexts including the courtroom, the trial transcript, appellate opinion, legal textbooks and the Supreme Court opinion in order to understand how prior legal discourses affect the outcomes of legal questions. To do so we will learn about and apply particular critical lenses to our texts including rhetorical culture, critical legal studies, narrative and the law as literature movement, and discourse analysis. In addition to reading trial transcripts and legal opinions, students will be expected to visit a courtroom and watch the proceedings during the course of the semester. Prerequisite: Comm 255, or consent of the instructor.
  • COMM 388: Rhetoric and Public Memory
    Ancient rhetoricians such as Aristotle, Cicero and Quintilian have made memory central to the study and teaching of rhetoric. However, recent work by contemporary scholars goes beyond examinations of memory as mnemonic aid to consider memory, and its construction, as rhetorical activity. The primary interest in this respect is the persuasive and communicative features of memory and memory-making. This course examines the rhetoric of collective memory by focusing on how the past is constructed to serve the present. We will explore the communicative bases of public memory and its role in experiences of place and understandings of identity. We will consider how rhetoricians have addressed the issue of memory, paying close attention to how they discuss the materiality of memory, the social and cultural politics shaping the construction of memory, and the theoretical concepts and methods used to rhetorically analyze texts and sites of memory. Prerequisite: COMM 255 or permission from instructor.
  • COMM 389: Political Economy of Media
    This course introduces students to critical theories concerned with the political and economic authority of modern media industries. We discuss the potential impact of the consolidation of media ownership on the diversity and localism of media; the gatekeeping and agenda-setting functions of globalizing and corporatized media; the increasingly influential role of multinational media corporations in international policy and trade negotiations; the importance of institutional structure as it relates to the world of journalism; the struggle between public and commercial interests to define and control the infrastructure, content, and interactive spaces of new media; and the possibilities and pitfalls of past and present media reform movements. Prerequisite: Comm 255, or Jour 320, or consent of the instructor.
  • COMM 390: Internship
    Off-campus professional work experience. One credit acceptable, but two credit internships preferred.
  • COMM 420: Senior Seminar
    Focus of seminar changes frequently.
    Fall 2016 Seminar: Advertising and Consumer Culture. The historical development of U.S. media industries has been integrally linked to advertising. And as the political, economic, and cultural reach of U.S. media has grown, so too has the power and influence of the advertising industry. In this course, we examine the history of the U.S. advertising industry, the policies that have shaped its role in contemporary society, and the cultural implications of living in a world dominated by advertising.
    Spring 2017 Seminar: Fashion, Identity, and Power. Fashion is among the most visible and meaningful ways in which we express ourselves. In addition to being "what we wear," it is a mode of communication and a reflection of the historical moment. Changes in clothing and discourses surrounding clothing indicate shifts in relationships and reflect tensions between groups of people. In this seminar we will explore the various social, cultural, economic, political, and personal meanings associated with fashion and consumption, while using media and cultural theory to trace the implications of sartorial style for the production and reproduction of gender norms from the 18th century to the present moment.

 

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  • CSCI 107: Introduction to Web Programming
    A broad introduction to World Wide Web programming and related technologies. Topics include Internet history and its architecture, managing an account on a Web server, HTML markup, use of style sheets (CSS), page layout design, introduction to interactive programming with JavaScript, the document object model (DOM), and HTML forms. This is a general audience course suitable for those with no prior programming experience.
  • CSCI 109: Intro to Programming for Robots
    This course introduces the basic elements of computer programming by using the Mindstorms programming environment. Students work in teams, writing programs to make their robots perform assigned tasks. The standard building blocks of programming (sequencing, repetition, selection) are developed in the user-friendly, icon-based, drag-and-drop Mindstorms environment. During the second half of the course, students program robots in Python and Java. Each student must have a laptop computer for each class session. This is a beginning course, designed for students with no programming experience. (Not open to students who have completed FIYS 113 or CSCI 112. Does not satisfy requirements for the CSCI major or minor.)
  • CSCI 112: Computer Science I
    Introduction to computer science. Topics include the basic building blocks of problem solving (sequence, selection, repetition), object-oriented programming, basic data structures and algorithms. A prior knowledge of computer science is not required, although a good background in high school Mathematics is recommended. Students may receive credit for this course based on the AP computer science exam.
  • CSCI 212: Computer Science II
    Continuation of Computer Science I. Emphasis on advanced data structures, algorithms, and object-oriented design. Topics include linked data structures, recursion, algorithm analysis, interfaces, and inheritance. Prerequisite: Computer Science 112 with a grade of C or better.
  • CSCI 213: Intro to Computer Architecture
    Computer architecture, including digital logic, modern CPU design, memory layout, assembly language programming, addressing techniques, input/output design, and interfacing with high-level languages. Prerequisite: Computer Science 112.
  • CSCI 214: Principles of Digital Logic
    Basic logic, digital electronics, microcomputer architecture, and interfacing, with hands-on laboratory activity. Prerequisite: Computer Science 213.
  • CSCI 260: Symbolic Logic
    An introduction to propositional and predicate logic. Topics include formal semantics, translation, natural deduction, quantification theory, and completeness. The relevance of logic to computer theory and artificial intelligence is stressed.
  • CSCI 270: Web Development
    This course builds upon Web programming fundamentals. Review of HTML fundamentals and introduction to HTML 5. Review of CSS fundamentals. Detailed coverage of CSS topics including cascade, selectors, box model, positioning, and pure CSS page layout. Introduction to grid design and wireframing. Review of JavaScript fundamentals. Introduction to using pre-written DHTML widgets and JavaScript frameworks such as JQuery. Introduction to server-side scripting with PHP. Prerequisites: Art 142 and CSCI 107. Students are encouraged to take CSCI 112 before this course.
  • CSCI 277: Web Design and Development
    In a project and laboratory-based format, this course focuses on the intersecting skills sets and theoretical knowledge of the graphic artist and Web programmer. Core concepts covered include Web site conceptualization, design conventions and usability considerations, constructing graphical mockups, progressing to XHTML/CSS integration and template construction. Additional topics include Web standards and validation, open source content management systems, dynamically server generated pages, and data collection with XHTML forms. Students will gain proficiency with software such as Adobe's Illustrator and Dreamweaver. A computer laboratory fee will be assessed for this course. Pre-requisites: CSCI 107 and Art 142.
    ART 277
  • CSCI 312: Client-Server Web Applications
    An in-depth study of building Web applications using the client-server model. Topics include an overview of HTML and HTML forms for collecting user data, client-server interaction, CGI programming, storage and manipulation of server data using databases, and returning dynamic content to the client. Preprocessed HTML documents with PHP or Java Server Pages and Web session control with cookies and other useful objects. Additional topics may include the distributed object framework, XML for data extensibility, and an overview of Microsoft's Active Server Pages (ASP) and .NET platform for distributed Web applications. Prerequisite: Computer Science 212.
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  • CSCI 317: Data Structures and Algorithms
    The study of advanced data structures and algorithm analysis. Topics include trees, hash tables, heaps, sorting algorithms, and graph algorithms. The emphasis will be on applying data structures to design and implement efficient algorithms. Additional topics may include dynamic programming and computational complexity. Prerequisite: Computer Science 212.

  • CSCI 318: Programming Languages
    A study of different problem solving paradigms, and representative programming languages. Topics include imperative vs. functional vs. event-driven vs. declarative paradigms, markup vs. computation, typing, memory organization, scope, and lifetime management. Lab exercises focus on working in the various paradigms, and the trade-offs involved. Prerequisite: Computer Science 212.
  • CSCI 323: Cryptography
    An introduction to cryptology and cryptanalysis, the making of codes and the breaking of codes. History and basic concepts. Classical ciphers and attacks on classical ciphers. One-time Pad. Modern ciphers including DES, AES. Public key ciphers including RSA and Diffie-Hellman. Digital signatures. Additional topics may include Elliptic Curve systems, knapsack systems, and other cryptographic systems. Prerequisites: Mathematics 230 and Computer Science 212, or permission of the instructor.
    MATH 323
  • CSCI 334: Theory of Computation
    This course covers fundamental ideas in the theory of computation, including formal languages, computability, complexity, and reducibility among computational problems. Topics include formal languages, finite state automata, Kleene's theorem, formal grammars, pushdown automata, context-free languages, Turing machines, computability, Church's Thesis, decidability, unsolvability, and NP- completeness. Prerequisites: CSCI 212 and Mathematics 230.
    MATH 334
  • CSCI 336: Operating Systems
    An introduction to modern operating systems and their most important features. Topics include multiprocessing, virtual memory, multithreading, concurrency, I/O, networking, security, and distributed computing. Students construct a major component of an operating system in C or C++. Prerequisites: Computer Science 212 and 213.
  • CSCI 360: Math Modeling
    Introduction to the process and techniques of modeling actual situations using mathematical methods and computer simulation. Topics may include optimization, dynamical systems, axiom systems, queuing theory, and introduction of a simulation language. Team projects and reports. Prerequisites: Mathematics 111, Computer Science 212, and some additional sophistication in at least one of the following: mathematics, computer science, or applying mathematics in a field of interest.
  • CSCI 365: Algebraic Coding Theory

  • CSCI 375: Combinatorics & Graph Theory
    Enumeration techniques with emphasis on permutations and combinations, generating functions, recurrence relations, inclusion and exclusion, and the pigeonhole principle. Graph theory with emphasis on trees, circuits, cut sets, planar graphs, chromatic numbers, and transportation networks. Additional topics from designs with emphasis on Latin squares, finite projective and affine geometries, block designs, and design of experiments. Prerequisite: Mathematics 230.
    MATH 375
  • CSCI 417: Algorithms and Algorithm Analysis
    The study of algorithms and their mathematical analysis. Divide-and-conquer, greedy, brute-force, dynamic programming, backtracking, advanced tree and graph algorithms, big-O notation, case and amortized analysis. Prerequisites: Mathematics 230 and Computer Science 317.
  • CSCI 425: Artificial Intelligence
    An introduction to AI via topics including tree and graph searches, min-max methods, alpha-beta pruning, heuristics, backtracking, natural language processing, and computer vision. Prerequisite: Computer Science 212.
    NEUR 425
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  • CSCI 427: Introduction to Database Systems
    An in-depth study of proper methods of design for database systems, with an emphasis on the relational model. Topics include relational design, query languages, and transactional processing. Lab exercises focus on GUI-driven, SQL-based access as well as modern, multi-tier styles of design. Prerequisite: Computer Science 212.
  • CSCI 461: Compiler Design
    An introduction to the design and construction of compilers for modern programming languages. Topics include grammars, formal language definition, abstract syntax trees, symbol tables, syntax and semantic checking, code generation, and optimization. Students construct a modern compiler for an object-oriented programming language. Prerequisites: Mathematics 230 and Computer Science 212 and 213.
  • CSCI 488: Senior Seminar in Computer Science
    A seminar-like discussion of software engineering, object-oriented design, and large-scale software development. Students will practice modern software engineering as well as read and present papers concerning the subject. Prerequisites: Computer Science 317, 318 and permission of the instructor. (Meets GEC Senior Studies Requirement.)
  • CSCI 489: Advanced Topics in Computer Science
    Special topics and projects in computer science, including but not limited to distributed systems, secure computing, Web development, user-interface design, and software engineering. Prerequisites: Computer Science 317, 318, and permission of instructor. (Meets GEC Senior Studies Requirement.)

 

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  • ECON 110: Principles of Economics
    An introduction to both microeconomics, the theory of consumer and producer behavior, and macroeconomics, the determination of aggregate levels of production, employment, inflation, and growth. Application of economic principles to the analysis of current problems of the U.S. economy.
    IREL 110
  • ECON 129: MS Excel for E/B/F Students
    (Beginning and Intermediate Microsoft Excel Workshop for Economics, Business, & Finance Students). This hands-on workshop for the E/B/F Department allows students to learn basic and intermediate Microsoft Excel skills. These skills will be applied in future E/B/F courses and in the workplace using spreadsheet software. By the end of this course, students will be able to perform spreadsheet calculations, and create professional graphs and charts from data. Skills included in this workshop are: working with formulas and functions (including Regression Analysis and best-fit lines), formatting a worksheet, working with charts, analyzing data using formulas, managing workbook data, using tables (including Pivot Tables & Charts), Analyzing table data, automating worksheet tasks, enhancing charts, Macros & VBA, and using the What If analysis. Working files are included to allow students to follow along using the same source material that the author uses throughout the lessons. This course meets for seven 90-minute instructor-led sessions in a PC computer lab and seven online meetings. This 0.50-credit course is graded Credit/D/F and has no prerequisites.
  • ECON 130: Applied Statistics
    Distribution analysis, sampling theory, statistical inference, and regression analysis, with emphasis on the application of statistical techniques using spreadsheet software to analyze economic and business issues. Students who have taken this course will not receive credit for MATH 150. Prerequisite or corequisite: ECON 129.
    BUSN 130, FIN 130
  • ECON 210: Microeconomic Theory
    Application of both theoretical and empirical analysis to consumer demand; to the firm both as producer of goods and as buyer of inputs, in both monopoly and competitive markets; and to public policy issues such as public goods, law and economics, and the environment. Prerequisites: ECON 110 and MATH 110 or MATH 160 with grades of C- or better.
  • ECON 220: Macroeconomic Theory
    Analysis of the determinants of aggregate production, prices, interest rates, and employment in macroeconomic models that combine the business, household, government, and financial sectors. Prerequisites: ECON 110 and MATH 110 or MATH 160 with grades of C- or better.
    IREL 212
  • ECON 245: Child Labor in Latin America
    Explores the role of child labor in the economies of developing Latin American countries, focusing on the question 'Do countries need to use child labor to industrialize?' Historically, industrialized countries have relied heavily on children to work in factories and mines. Today it appears history is repeating itself as developing countries utilize children in the informal sectors. The employment of children in Brazil, Colombia, Peru, Chile, and Argentina will be examined in detail. The economic, political, social/cultural, and technological explanations for child labor will be explored for each country. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.) Prerequisite: ECON 110.
    LNAM 245, IREL 215
  • ECON 265: Poverty, Inequality, Discrimination
    This course explores how the discipline of economics can explain and analyze the causes and effects of poverty, inequality and discrimination. It will examine how various populations (defined by race, age, gender, class, sexual orientation, etc.) experience these differently. Students will be introduced to (1) economic theories of poverty, inequality and discrimination, (2) ways to measure each and (3) public policies designed to mitigate poverty, inequality and discrimination in the US. Since women are more likely than men to be poor and a large number of policies are aimed at women and children, particular emphasis is given to the role of gender. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.) Prerequisite: ECON 110 with a grade of C- or better.
    GSWS 265
  • ECON 280: The Mexican-American Border
    As the only place where the third world and first world touch, the Mexican-American border is unique. This course will focus on the border and how its unique location in the world has created a culture, language, politics, religion and economy that reflect the interdependence between these two neighboring countries. The course will begin with the history of the border from the Gadsden Purchase in 1854 to the passage of NAFTA in 2004 and then examine the impact of free trade on Mexico. The course will explore how people (immigration - both legal and illegal), resources (oil, workers), consumer products (household appliances, food, music, and art), environmental waste (toxic waste, water and air pollution) and technology (outsourcing) cross borders as globalization impacts both Mexicans and Americans. The course involves a three-week stay along the border in May. Pre-requisites: ECON 110 and SPAN 112 or its equivalent. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    IREL 280, BUSN 280, LNAM 280, SPAN 201
  • ECON 310: Industrial Organization
    Analysis of the behavior of firms under different industrial structures - competitive, monopolistic, oligopolistic. An evaluation of antitrust policies and other government regulations of industry. Specific topics covered include advertising, auctions, networks, product differentiation, market standards, and vertical and horizontal integrations. Prerequisite: ECON 210 with a grade of C- or better.
  • ECON 313: Money & Banking
    Analysis of bank and nonbank financial institutions. Topics include the S&L crisis, the impact of the 1980 and 1982 deregulation acts, the changing role of the Federal Reserve and the ability to conduct effective monetary policy, and bank asset and liability management. Prerequisite: ECON 220.
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  • ECON 320: Labor Economics
    In this course, standard theories of labor economics are developed. Topics include labor supply, labor demand, education, discrimination, contracting, and unions. Particular emphasis is given to the labor force participation of married women and single mothers, earnings, wage distributions and inequality, job training, and employment benefits. Empirical analysis complements theoretical modeling, especially in the area of women's work and international comparisons regarding labor laws and labor market outcomes. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.) Prerequisite: ECON 210.
    GSWS 320
  • ECON 325: Economics of Land
    (The Economics of Land: Valuation, Use, and Taxation) The course examines several different roles of land in the economy; as a productive asset, as an investment, as a store of value, and as a base for taxation. Topics to be covered include various definitions of property rights, regulatory policy toward land use and land preservation, models of land valuation, and the theory and practice of property taxation and tax preferences. We will examine policies across different states, countries, and eras. Prerequisite: ECON 210.
  • ECON 330: Econometrics
    Use of statistical methods, especially multiple regression, to test hypotheses based on economic theory. Some use of computer programs. Prerequisites: ECON/BUSN/FIN 130, MATH 110, and either ECON 210 or ECON 220.
  • ECON 340: Environ & Natural Resource Econ
    (Environmental and Natural Resource Economics) Examines different economic theories regarding optimal use of renewable and nonrenewable resources, why market responses to pollution are typically unsatisfactory, and optimal pollution control. These theories are then applied to the real world, taking into consideration political and technological constraints. The impact of past and current policy on the environment will be studied, as will the potential impact of proposed legislation. Prerequisite: ECON 210 or permission of the instructor.
    ES 340
  • ECON 345: Economics and Law
    This course covers an economic analysis of laws and legal institutions with an emphasis on how they affect markets and individual decision-making. Topics covered will include property, contract, tort, criminal, environmental, and antitrust laws. Prerequisite: ECON 210.
  • ECON 350: Public Finance
    Theory and policy analysis of the effects of government spending and taxation on the allocation and distribution of income. Special attention is given to tax reform proposals and other current policy issues. Prerequisite: ECON 210.
  • ECON 360: Health Economics
    Examines how economic analysis can be applied to various components of the health care system. Microeconomic theory is used to understand the operation of health care markets and the behavior of participants (consumers, insurers, physicians, and hospitals) in the health care industry. International comparisons and the role of the public sector will be included. Prerequisites: ECON 210.
  • ECON 375: Economics of Sport
    The purpose of this course is to analyze the economics of sport. Sport throughout the world has a distinct and substantial commercial character, and developments in the world of modern sport cannot be fully understood without applying economic principles and methodology. Topics discussed include the market for players, the implications of the functioning of league monopolies, and an analysis of the economic impact of stadiums and mega-sports events such as the World Cup and the Olympic Games. Prerequisite: ECON 210.
  • ECON 380: Game Theory
    Game theory is the study of purposeful behavior in strategic situations. Game theory incorporates mathematical models of conflict and cooperation in situations of uncertainty (about nature and about decision makers). Various solution concepts such as Nash equilibrium, subgame perfect equilibrium, Bayesian and perfect Bayesian equilibrium will be analyzed. These concepts will be illustrated using a variety of economic models, from industrial organization, bargaining, the role of repeated interaction, and models of asymmetric information. Prerequisites: ECON 210 and MATH 110.
  • ECON 381: Economics of Development
    Studies the problem of sustaining accelerated economic growth in less-developed countries. This course emphasizes the issues of growth; poverty and inequality; how land labor and credit affect economic development; problems of capital formation, economic planning and international specialization and trade; and the interaction of industrialization, agricultural development, and population change. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.) Prerequisite: ECON 210.
    IREL 318
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  • ECON 385: Mathematical Economics
    Calculus and linear algebra are applied to the analysis of microeconomic and macroeconomic theory. The tools of mathematical optimization are developed with a particular focus on comparative statics. Issues of discrete and continuous time and uncertainty in economics are explored. Prerequisites: MATH 111 and either ECON 210 or 220; or permission of instructor.
  • ECON 430: International Trade Theory & Policy
    Analysis of elements of economic structure that determine trade flows, theory relating to how trade flows alter economic structure, the free trade versus protectionism argument, and selected topics in international economic integration and development. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.) Prerequisites: ECON 210 and ECON 220; and junior or senior standing.
  • ECON 431: International Finance
    Identifies and analyzes fundamentals of international financial theory. Topics include exchange rate determination, balance of payments accounting, and international monetary systems and their evolution. Prerequisites: Economics 210 and 220; and junior or senior standing.
    FIN 431
  • ECON 440: Advanced Macroeconomics
    Analysis and comparison of Keynesian, neoKeynesian, neoclassical, monetarist, and rational expectationist perspectives on macroeconomic theory and stabilization policy. Prerequisites: MATH 110 and ECON 220; and junior or senior standing.
  • ECON 483: Behavioral Economics and Finance
    This course surveys research incorporating evidence from psychology into economic and financial decision-making theory. The aim of the course is to understand economic and financial models that more realistically explain and predict observed outcomes. The course explores prospect theory, biases in probabilistic judgment, projections biases, default effects, self-control problems, mental accounting, fairness and altruism. Students will use these tools to understand public goods contributions, financial market anomalies, consumption and savings behavior and myriad market outcomes. Prerequisites: ECON/BUSN/FIN 130 (or ECON/BUSN 180) and ECON 210.
    FIN 483
  • ECON 489: Globalization and Its Impact
    Examines the impact of globalization on rich countries (the United States) and poor countries (Mexico, India, and China). An examination of free trade agreements will cast light on the political motives behind these agreements as well as the economic projections made. The economic impact of the creation of free trade zones is explored using both microeconomics and macroeconomics. Statistical evidence will document whether globalization has caused growth in GDP, employment, and income in poor countries. The responsibility of multinational companies in creating sweatshops, worker exploitation, and cultural disintegration are discussed in light of U.S. businesses located in Mexico, India, and China. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.) Prerequisites: ECON/BUSN 130 (or ECON/BUSN 180), ECON 210, and ECON 220.
    BUSN 489
  • ECON 490: Internship
    Provides an opportunity to supplement academic training with work experience in the field of business and economics. Interested students must work with Career Services to develop a resume and register with the instructor by the following deadlines: by April 1 for a Fall internship; by November 1 for a Spring internship; and by the week following spring break for a Summer internship. Business and Economics internships may be done for either one or two credits. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, Economics 110 with a grade of C- or better as well as other designated courses relevant to the internship and earning a C or better in combination of these courses and Economics 110. Internships need to be for different experiences therefore continuation of previous internships, part-time or summer jobs is not allowed. The department will not give credit for internships that do not build directly on prior course work. Students on academic probation are ineligible for this program. Contact the Internship Supervisor for Economics and Business regarding additional information and guidelines.
    BUSN 490, FIN 490

 

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  • EDUC 104: Elem Math from Advanced Standpoint

    EDUC 104: Elementary Math from an Advanced Standpoint

    This course presents a critical examination of several topics from elementary mathematics. The course stresses three themes: mathematics in the liberal arts, mathematics from a historical perspective, and mathematics as a problem-solving activity. Topics to be covered include college algebra, numeration systems, non-base-10 representations, and elementary number theory including primes and factorizations, rationals as terminating and repeating decimals, irrationals, simple probability experiments, elementary set theory, and mathematical reasoning. Cross-listed as: MATH 104
    MATH 104
  • EDUC 108: Learning About the Living World
    This course will examine selected topics in life science and earth science such as the human body and its functioning, ecology, ecosystems, weather, the water cycle, and erosion. Designed primarily to provide elementary education majors with the necessary background for teaching in K-8 schools, the course is appropriate for other students interested in strengthening their knowledge and confidence in investigating fundamental concepts and ideas in science. Students will participate in lectures, discussion, student presentations and projects, and laboratory activities. Two 50-minute class hours per week plus one two-hour session for laboratory, demonstrations, or field work. Does not satisfy requirements for the Biology major.
    BIOL 108
  • EDUC 109: Learning About the Physical World
    This course will examine selected topics in physical science such as the physical and chemical properties of matter, energy, motion of objects, waves and vibrations, components of the solar system and interactions of objects in the universe. This course is appropriate for students interested in strengthening their knowledge and confidence in investigating fundamental concepts and ideas in science. The course is designed with elementary education majors in mind to provide them with the necessary background for teaching science. Students will participate in lectures, discussions, projects, and laboratory activities. Two 80-minute class hours per week. Not applicable toward the chemistry major or minor.
    CHEM 109
  • EDUC 170: Intro to Music Teaching & Learning
    This course introduces students to the skills of teaching music. It explores how human beings acquire musicianship, and covers the foundational elements of music education. Musical elements addressed include: musical development, musical aptitude, listening, movement, rhythm, song teaching, singing, improvisation, composition, and basic teaching techniques associated with these. Students should expect to actively engage in music making, teaching, and critical thinking. Peer teaching and clinical work with elementary students are key components of this course. Prerequisite: MUSC 150 or permission of instructor.
    MUSC 170, MUSE 170
  • EDUC 210: Observing the Schooling Process
    An introduction to the teaching-learning process from elementary through high school. Participants observe, analyze, and discuss a variety of educational environments, including classrooms with exceptional students and classrooms in multicultural settings. Major focus on developing competencies in educational library research and writing skills. Not open to First-Year students.
  • EDUC 212: Educational Reform in the U.S.
    This course will explore the meaning of educational reform in the United States, both from a historical and philosophical perspective and in the context of contemporary educational policy. Students will begin the course by studying the progressive educational reform movement of the early twentieth century. They will look at ways in which progressive education initiatives, including the open education movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s, have been challenged by proponents of standardization in schools. Charter schools, magnet schools, school vouchers, and No Child Left Behind also will be examined in order to better understand how the notion of educational reform is one that can be viewed from a wide variety of perspectives and within multiple contexts.
    AMER 212, PHIL 214
  • EDUC 215: Instructional CommTheory & Practice

    EDUC 215: Instructional Communication Theory and Practice

    This course applies socio-linguistic theory to the understanding of learning in academic settings. Based on the premise that knowledge is socially constructed, race, gender, class, and ethnicity are considered social markers that shape the meanings and the values assigned to instructional messages. Students study communication practices in the classroom, apply theories in their analyses, and practice methods and strategies toward becoming more effective communicators through creation and/or delivery of lecture, discussion and cooperative learning simulations. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • EDUC 220: Philosophy of Education
    Survey of significant theories of education, introduction to philosophical analysis of educational concepts, and development of analytical skills applicable to clarifying and resolving pedagogical and policy issues.
    PHIL 220
  • EDUC 232: The Teaching of Writing
    Introduces students to theories of writing development with the intention of learning to teach others how to improve their writing skills and strategies.
  • EDUC 239: Hist of Educ in American Society
    (History of Education in American Society) Historical role of education in American society; education as a panacea and as a practical solution; schooling vs. education. Emphasis is on the twentieth century.
    HIST 239, AMER 270
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  • EDUC 244: Anthropology of Education
    For the anthropologist, education is the mechanism of socialreproduction, a strategy not limited to schooling but in fact encompassing a person's entire life. For much of the world, the privileging of schooling as a site of education has had real ramifications on the possibility of maintaining cultural forms that go against the pressures of globalization and capitalism. This course opens with a broad consideration of education before focusing on schooling as the preferred institutional form of education under early 21st century globalism. Our questions will include both how schooling operates to maintain existing social structures and power relations and the possibilities - and consequences - of schools as a site of change. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    SOAN 244
  • EDUC 271: Teaching Winds and Percussion
    EDUC 271: The Art of Teaching Wind and Percussion Instruments. This course introduces students to the techniques of teaching woodwind, brass, and percussion instruments. Students will develop competency on these instruments and learn appropriate instructional strategies to teach these instruments. Specific instruments include: flute, clarinet, alto saxophone, trumpet, horn, trombone, euphonium, snare drum, and bells. Students should expect to actively engage in music making, teaching, and critical thinking. Peer teaching and clinical work with elementary/middle school students are key components of this course. Prerequisites: EDUC 170 Corequisites: No corequisites
    MUSC 271, MUSE 271
  • EDUC 272: Teaching String Instruments
    EDUC 272: The Art of Teaching String Instruments. This course introduces students to the techniques of playing and teaching string instruments. Students will develop competency on these instruments and learn appropriate instructional strategies to teach these instruments. Specific instruments include: violin, viola, cello, and bass. Students should expect to actively engage in music making, teaching, and critical thinking. Peer teaching and clinical work with elementary/middle school students are key components of this course. Prerequisites: EDUC 170, with a grade of B- or better. Corequisites: No corequisites.
    MUSC 272, MUSE 272
  • EDUC 273: Teaching Instrumental Ensembles
    EDUC 273: The Art of Teaching Instrumental Ensembles. This course introduces students to the techniques of teaching bands and orchestras. This course is intended to provide students with a strong foundation of both skill and conceptual understanding in order to prepare them for a career in instrumental music education. It involve learning within both a college classroom setting and as a teacher and observer within K-12 schools. Specific elements include: conducting, score study, rehearsal technique, practical elements associated with organizing and executing an instrumental ensemble, and band/orchestra literature. Students should expect to actively engage in music making, teaching, and critical thinking. Peer teaching and clinical work with middle school students are key components of this course. Prerequisites: EDUC 170 with a grade of B- or better. Corequisites: No corequisites.
    MUSC 273, MUSE 273
  • EDUC 274: Teaching Choral Ensembles
    EDUC 274: The Art of Teaching Choral Ensembles. This course introduces students to the techniques of teaching choir. This course is intended to provide students with a strong foundation of both skill and conceptual understanding in order to prepare them for a career in vocal music education. It involves learning within both a classroom setting and as a teacher and observer within K-12 schools. Specific elements include: conducting, score study, rehearsal technique, practical elements associated with organizing and executing a choral ensemble, and choral literature. Students should expect to actively engage in music making, teaching, and critical thinking. Peer teaching and clinical work with middle school students are key components of this course. Prerequisites: EDUC 170 with a grade of B- or better. Corequisites: No corequisites.
    MUSC 274, MUSE 274
  • EDUC 275: Teaching Music in Elementary School
    EDUC 275: Teaching Music in the Elementary School. This course introduces students to the techniques of teaching music to elementary age students. Students will become exposed to developmentally appropriate musical activities for students in kindergarten through eighth grade. Multiple approaches will be presented including Orff, Kodaly, Dalcroze, and Music Learning Theory. Students should expect to actively engage in music making, teaching, and critical thinking. Peer teaching and clinical work with elementary students are key components of this course. Prerequisites: EDUC 170 with a grade of B- or better. Corequisites: No corequisites.
    MUSE 275
  • EDUC 303: Reading Methods in Elementary Schl

    EDUC 303: Reading Methods in the Elementary School

    Places emphasis on theories of language acquisition and on characteristics of language development as they relate to teaching reading and the language arts. Includes research-based practices related to teaching reading comprehension, vocabulary acquisition and development, fluency, and grapho-phonemic skills; includes multiple approaches to reading and language instruction. Students will learn strategies for teaching ELL students and students with exceptional needs and differentiation models for meeting the needs of each student. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 304. Prerequisites: Education 210 and licensure candidate status.
    EDUC 403
  • EDUC 304: Elementary Fieldwork & Seminar
    Half-day pre-student teaching fieldwork practicum in the elementary school. Elementary licensure candidates complete 150 hours of supervised classroom observation and participation. Placements are arranged by the Education Department and supervised by faculty within the Education Department on a biweekly basis. Placement in a multicultural setting with a focus on instructional strategies for English language learners (ELLs) is required. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 303. Prerequisites: Education 210 and licensure candidate status. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.) Cross-listed as: EDUC 404.
    EDUC 404
  • EDUC 305: Teaching in the Elementary School
    This course emphasizes the importance of developing special skills, competencies, and understanding for teaching elementary school students. It includes philosophy, curriculum, instruction, and methods; design and development of elementary-grade lessons and programs; and observation and participation in elementary school classrooms. Prerequisites: Education 210, Education 313, Education 315, and Psychology 210.
  • EDUC 309: Immigration and Education

    EDUC 309: Immigration and Education: Race, Language, and American Schools

    While immigration has become a lightning rod for political debate, there is a long history of using education as a tool toward socializing different newcomer groups into American society. This course will examine the ways in which schools have wrestled with the issues of immigration, race, and language as well as the policies and programs that serve to meet immigrant needs in schools, and the social and political implications of immigration. There will be special attention given to Chicago's particular port-of-entry issues. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
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  • EDUC 310: Equity & Social Justice in Educ
    (Equity and Social Justice in Education) This course intends to examine notions of 'equity' and 'social justice' in the context of three aspects of education: the historical founding of U.S. schools on oppressive ideals; the ways in which race, gender, and sexual orientation affect and disrupt one's experiences of schooling; and the evolution of the efforts to work against these phenomena within the field of education. The course will explore equity and social justice from a variety of perspectives and through different texts, including analytical journal articles and personal narratives. Readings and discussions will be based heavily on the local world of public education as a microcosm of these issues as they have played out nationally and internationally. Not open to first-year students. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ETHC 340, AFAM 310
  • EDUC 311: Advanced Fieldwork
    Students who have completed 210 and wish to have additional experience of a different nature in school settings may apply for independent study in schools. Research on some special aspect of schooling is often required. This course is graded only on a Credit/D/Fail basis.
  • EDUC 312: Integrating Arts in Learning Proc

    EDUC 312: Integrating the Arts in the Learning Process

    This course focuses on the integration of the fine arts in the elementary school curriculum. Students will learn how to meaningfully incorporate the visual arts, drama, music, and dance across the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities in K-8 classrooms to enrich the learning process.
  • EDUC 313: Reading Methods in Content Areas
    Multiple approaches to the teaching of reading, characteristics of language development and its relation to intellectual development in the disciplines, and the application of instructional models to the teaching of writing and reading in the content areas, including teaching exceptional students, especially English Language Learners. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 315. Prerequisites: Education 210 and teacher licensure candidate status.
    EDUC 413
  • EDUC 314: Inclusive Learning Environments
    Emphasis on approaches and methodology that establish an inclusive classroom environment, including methods of instruction and curriculum and instructional and management modifications for students with exceptionalities. Response to Intervention, IEPs, and other school practices that aim to meet the needs of each child are included in this course. Topics include identification of various exceptionalities (e.g., learning disabilities, mental retardation, physical disabilities, etc.) that affect students and the structuring of their learning environments; the role of the special educator in relation to the regular classroom teacher; federal and state legislation that governs special education and the role of the regular classroom teacher; observation and analysis of students with exceptionalities in various learning environments; multicultural and linguistic differences as related to special education; instructional strategy modifications for special populations; and the development of classroom cultures that are sensitive and responsive to differences in gender and sexual orientation. Prerequisite: Psychology 210, Psychology 318, or permission of the department chairperson. Cross-listed as: EDUC 414

    EDUC 414
  • EDUC 315: Middle School Fieldwork & Seminar
    Half-day pre-student teaching fieldwork practicum in the middle and junior high school. Secondary licensure candidates complete 150 hours of supervised classroom observation and participation. Placements are arranged by the Education Department and supervised by faculty within the Education Department on a biweekly basis. Placement at a multicultural site with a focus on instructional strategies for English language learners (ELLs) is required. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 313. Prerequisite: Acceptance for licensure candidacy. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.) Cross-listed as: EDUC 415.
    EDUC 415
  • EDUC 320: Comparative and International Educ
    (Comparative and International Education: Education as the Practice of Freedom) This course examines both the study and practice of comparative and international education. The course is organized with a multidisciplinary perspective with analysis of history, theory, methods, and issues in comparative and international education. A major goal of the course is to interrogate the linkages between education and society. Recurrent themes will be examined to demonstrate how every educational system not only arises from but also shapes its particular socio-cultural context. Students will have the opportunity to deepen and expand their knowledge of educational issues within a global context. Not open to first year students. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ETHC 330, SOAN 344, IREL 388
  • EDUC 322: Education in Developing Countries
    (Education and Development in Developing Countries) This course explores the historical background, philosophical foundations and major themes in the education of 'developing countries' within the broader context of global development and social change. The specific goal of this course is to familiarize students with the evolution of and critical issues in formal education in most low income, less industrialized nations. Students will be able to explore contemporary themes in education from a historical and comparative perspective. Additionally, they will expand their conceptual schema for rethinking educational issues within and beyond their own societies. Geographically, this course covers countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America, but runs comparisons with countries in Europe and North America when theoretically relevant. Reading materials build on development studies and several disciplines in the social sciences and humanities such as history, philosophy, anthropology, sociology and education. Not open to first year students. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    IREL 322, SOAN 343
  • EDUC 403: Reading in the Elementary School
    Reading Methods in the Elementary School: Places emphasis on theories of language acquisition and on characteristics of language development as they relate to teaching reading and the language arts. Includes research-based practices related to teaching reading comprehension, vocabulary acquisition and development, fluency, and grapho-phonemic skills; includes multiple approaches to reading and language instruction. Students will learn strategies for teaching ELL students and students with exceptional needs and differentiation models for meeting the needs of each student. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 404. Prerequisites: Education 210 and MAT licensure candidate status.
    EDUC 303
  • EDUC 404: Elementary Fieldwork & Seminar
    Half-day pre-student teaching fieldwork practicum in the elementary school. Elementary licensure candidates complete 150 hours of supervised classroom observation and participation. Placements are arranged by the Education Department and supervised by faculty within the Education Department on a biweekly basis. Placement in a multicultural setting with a focus on instructional strategies for English language learners (ELLs) is required. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 403. Prerequisites: Education 210 and licensure candidate status. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.) Cross-listed as: EDUC 304.
    EDUC 304
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  • EDUC 406: Teaching Adolescent Students
    This course emphasizes the importance of developing special skills, competencies, and understanding for teaching middle school students. It includes middle-grade philosophy, curriculum, instruction, and methods; design and development of middle-grade lessons and programs; assessment coordination and referral of students to health and social services; and observation and participation in middle school classrooms. Prerequisites: Education 303 and 304.
    EDUC 506
  • EDUC 411: Advanced Fieldwork
    Students who have completed 210 and wish to have additional experience of a different nature in school settings may apply for independent study in schools. Research on some special aspect of schooling is often required. This course is graded only on a Credit/D/Fail basis.
  • EDUC 413: Reading Methods in Content Areas
    Multiple approaches to the teaching of reading, characteristics of language development and its relation to intellectual development in the disciplines, and the application of instructional models to the teaching of writing and reading in the content areas, including teaching exceptional students, especially the English Language Learners. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 415. Prerequisites: Education 210 and MAT licensure candidate status.
    EDUC 313
  • EDUC 414: Inclusive Learning Environments
    Emphasis on approaches and methodology that establish an inclusive classroom environment, including methods of instruction and curriculum and instructional and management modifications for students with exceptionalities. Response to Intervention, IEPs, and other school practices that aim to meet the needs of each child are included in this course. Topics include identification of various exceptionalities (e.g., learning disabilities, mental retardation, physical disabilities, etc.) that affect students and the structuring of their learning environments; the role of the special educator in relation to the regular classroom teacher; federal and state legislation that governs special education and the role of the regular classroom teacher; observation and analysis of students with exceptionalities in various learning environments; multicultural and linguistic differences as related to special education; instructional strategy modifications for special populations; and the development of classroom cultures that are sensitive and responsive to differences in gender and sexual orientation. Prerequisite: Psychology 210, Psychology 318, or permission of the department chairperson. Cross-listed as: EDUC 314

    EDUC 314
  • EDUC 415: Middle School Fieldwork & Seminar
    Half-day pre-student teaching fieldwork practicum in the middle and junior high school. Secondary licensure candidates complete 150 hours of supervised classroom observation and participation. Placements are arranged by the Education Department and supervised by faculty within the Education Department on a biweekly basis. Placement at a multicultural site with a focus on instructional strategies for English language learners (ELLs) is required. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 413. Prerequisite: Acceptance for licensure candidacy. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.) Cross-listed as: EDUC 315.
    EDUC 315
  • EDUC 416: Elem & Mid Schl-Literacy & Soc Stud

    EDUC 416: Curriculum and Instruction in the Elementary and Middle School: Content-Area Literacy and Social Studies

    Seminar focusing on research-based content area reading practices and curriculum and instructional planning. Includes theoretical and philosophical frameworks for curriculum design, instructional approaches, and assessment, including data analysis and its use in instructional planning. Also stresses principles of establishing various learning environments for student engagement in learning and curriculum integration and how curricula are organized for children at differing developmental levels with various backgrounds in school literacy environments. Prerequisite: Education 303/304 with a grade of B- or better; co-requisite: Education 417.
    EDUC 516
  • EDUC 417: Elem & Mid Schl-Math & Science

    EDUC 417: Curriculum and Instruction in the Elementary and Middle School: Math and Science

    Seminar focusing on curriculum and instructional planning in math and science and how math and science curricula are organized for children at differing developmental levels and with various backgrounds. Includes theoretical and philosophical frameworks for curriculum design, instructional approaches, and assessment in math and science. Students will practice creating Teacher Work Samples that use data to plan instruction and help focus teachers on the impact of instruction on student learning Also stresses principles of and practice for using various technological teaching tools. This course has fieldwork experiences in science, math, and technology instruction. Prerequisite: Education 303/304 with a grade of B- or better; co-requisite Education 416.
    EDUC 517
  • EDUC 418: Elem Student Teaching & Seminar

    EDUC 418: Elementary Student Teaching and Seminar

    Full-day supervised teaching for 14 weeks in a cooperating school and a weekly seminar. This course is graded only on a SCR/D/Fail basis. (There will be a licensure portfolio scoring fee for this class of $300.) Prerequisite: Education 416/417 with a grade of B- or better.
    EDUC 518
  • EDUC 419: Adolescent Curr & Instruc Design
    EDUC 419: Adolescent Curriculum and Instructional Design

    This senior seminar focuses on the practical use of educational theory in the adolescent classroom by investigating and applying knowledge of research-based curriculum design practices, learning theory, lesson and course planning, assessment and use of data to improve instruction, integration of classroom technology, reading in the content areas, and classroom management. Students will conduct analyses of teaching theory and practice, create and analyze lesson design using an edTPA model, and analyze unit structures and resources through a series of authentic tasks. Prerequisite: Education 313/315 with a grade of B- or better; co-requisite Education 420. Cross-listed as: EDUC 519.

    EDUC 519
  • EDUC 420: Disc Spec Mthds Teachng Adolescents

    EDUC 420: Discipline-Specific Methods for Teaching Adolescents

    This senior seminar focuses on approaches and methodology in the teaching of the content area of licensure. Students will explore research-based instructional theories central to their teaching discipline, subject matter-specific ways of constructing knowledge, and specific methods of inquiry and assessment for learning in a particular subject field. Students will conduct research on an area of study relevant to their discipline, present content-area demonstration lessons, and construct a culminating unit demonstrating best practices for teaching in their disciplines. In addition, each student will be assigned a clinical placement in an adolescent classroom for observation hours and consultation with a field-based faculty mentor in connection with the class. Prerequisite: Education 313/315 with a grade of B- or better; co-requisite Education 419.
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  • EDUC 421: St Teach in Adolescent Classrms

    EDUC 421: Student Teaching in Adolescent Classrooms

    Full-day supervised teaching for 14 weeks at the appropriate grade level in a cooperating school and a weekly seminar. This course is graded only on a SCR/D/Fail basis. (There will be a licensure portfolio scoring fee for this class of $300.) Prerequisite: Education 419/420 or 422 with a grade of B- or better. Cross-listed as: EDUC 521
    EDUC 521
  • EDUC 422: Discipline-Specific K-12 Curriculum
    (Discipline-Specific K-12 Curriculum and Instructional Design) This senior seminar focuses on approaches and methodology in the teaching of the content area of licensure. Students will explore research-based instructional theories central to their teaching discipline, subject matter-specific ways of constructing knowledge, and specific methods of inquiry and assessment for learning in a particular subject field. Students will conduct research on an area of study relevant to their discipline, present content-area demonstration lessons, and construct a culminating unit demonstrating best practices for teaching in their disciplines. In addition, each student will be assigned two clinical placements: one in a high school for observation hours and consultation with a field-based faculty mentor; and one in an elementary school for a practicum teaching experience with a mentor teacher and a college supervisor. Prerequisite: entrance into teacher licensure program; EDUC 313 and 315 with grades of B- or better; co-requisite EDUC 419.
    EDUC 522
  • EDUC 450: Special Studies in Education
    Advanced research in the process of schooling and teaching. May be an independent project or an advanced internship. Available only to juniors and seniors. Can be taken for one or two credits depending on the scope of the project and with approval of Department Chair.
  • EDUC 501: Introduction to Teacher Research
    This course provides the MAT candidate with an introduction to educational research. Topics include the context of teacher research, an introduction to multiple varieties of teacher research, with an emphasis on action research, as well as grounding in quantitative and qualitative research methods. A case study of action research will be completed. Prerequisite: Second year MAT licensure candidate status.
  • EDUC 502: Teacher Action Research Project
    This course provides the MAT candidate with an opportunity to conduct a teacher action research project within the context of the student teaching placement. Supervision will be provided by Education Department Faculty members as well as the cooperating teaching in the elementary or secondary placement. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 518 or 521. Prerequisite: Education 516/517 sequence or 519/520 sequence or 522 sequence with a grade of B- or better and second year MAT licensure candidate status.
  • EDUC 506: Teaching Adolescent Students
    This course emphasizes the importance of developing special skills, competencies, and understanding for teaching middle school students. It includes middle-grade philosophy, curriculum, instruction, and methods; design and development of middle-grade lessons and programs; assessment coordination and referral of students to health and social services; and observation and participation in middle school classrooms. Prerequisites: Education 403/404 with a grade of B- or better and second year MAT licensure candidate status.
    EDUC 406
  • EDUC 516: Elem & Mid Schl-Literacy & Soc Stud
    (Curriculum and Instruction in the Elementary and Middle School: Content-Area Literacy and Social Studies) This graduate seminar focuses on research-based content area reading practices and curriculum and instructional planning. Includes theoretical and philosophical frameworks for curriculum design, instructional approaches, and assessment, including data analysis and its use in instructional planning. Also stresses principles of establishing various learning environments for student engagement in learning and curriculum integration and how curricula are organized for children at differing developmental levels with various backgrounds in school literacy environments. Additional work aligned with the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards criteria will be required. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 517. Prerequisite: Education 403 and 404 with a grade of B- or better and second year MAT licensure candidate status.

    EDUC 416
  • EDUC 517: Elem & Mid Schl-Math & Science
    (Curriculum and Instruction in the Elementary and Middle School: Math and Science) This graduate seminar focuses on curriculum and instructional planning in math and science and how math and science curricula are organized for children at differing developmental levels and with various backgrounds. Includes theoretical and philosophical frameworks for curriculum design, instructional approaches, and assessment in math and science. Students will practice creating Teacher Work Samples that use data to plan instruction and help focus teachers on the impact of instruction on student learning. Also stresses principles of and practice for using various technological teaching tools. This course has fieldwork experiences in science, math, and technology instruction. Additional work aligned with the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards criteria will be required. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 516. Prerequisite: Education 403 and 404 with a grade of B- or better and second year MAT licensure candidate status.
    EDUC 417
  • EDUC 518: Elementary Student Teaching & Semnr
    (Elementary Student Teaching and Seminar) Full-day supervised teaching for 14 weeks in a cooperating school and a weekly seminar. This course is graded only on a SCR/D/Fail basis. (There will be a licensure portfolio scoring fee for this class of $300.) Prerequisite: Education 516/517 with a grade of B- or better.
    EDUC 418
  • EDUC 519: Adolescent Curr and Instruct
    (Adolescent Curriculum and Instructional Design) This graduate seminar focuses on the practical use of educational theory in the adolescent classroom by investigating and applying knowledge of research-based curriculum design practices, learning theory, lesson and course planning, assessment and use of data to improve instruction, integration of classroom technology, reading in the content areas, and classroom management. Students will conduct analyses of teaching theory and practice, create and analyze lesson design using an edTPA model, and analyze unit structures and resources through a series of authentic tasks. Additional work aligned with the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards criteria will be required. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 520 or 522. Prerequisite: Education 413 and 415 with a grade of B- or better and second year MAT licensure candidate status.
    EDUC 419
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  • EDUC 520: Disc Spec Mthds Teach Adols
    (Discipline-Specific Methods for Teaching Adolescents) This graduate seminar focuses on approaches and methodology in the teaching of the content area of licensure. Students will explore research-based instructional theories central to their teaching discipline, subject matter-specific ways of constructing knowledge, and specific methods of inquiry and assessment for learning in a particular subject field. Students will conduct research on an area of study relevant to their discipline, present content-area demonstration lessons, and construct a culminating unit demonstrating best practices for teaching in their disciplines. In addition, each student will be assigned a clinical placement in an adolescent classroom for observation hours and consultation with a field-based faculty mentor in connection with the class. Additional work aligned with the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards criteria will be required. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 519. Prerequisite: Education 413 and 415 with a grade of B- or better and second year MAT licensure candidate status.
  • EDUC 521: Studnt Teach in Adol Classrooms
    (Student Teaching in Adolescent Classrooms) Full-day supervised teaching for 14 weeks at the appropriate grade level in a cooperating school and a weekly seminar. This course is graded only on a SCR/D/Fail basis. (There will be a licensure portfolio scoring fee for this class of $300.) Prerequisite: Education 519/520 or 522 with a grade of B- or better. Cross-listed as: EDUC 421
    EDUC 421
  • EDUC 522: Discipline-Specific K-12 Curriculum
    (Discipline-Specific K-12 Curriculum and Instructional Design) This graduate seminar focuses on approaches and methodology in the teaching of the content area of licensure. Students will explore research-based instructional theories central to their teaching discipline, subject matter-specific ways of constructing knowledge, and specific methods of inquiry and assessment for learning in a particular subject field. Students will conduct research on an area of study relevant to their discipline, present content-area demonstration lessons, and construct a culminating unit demonstrating best practices for teaching in their disciplines. In addition, each student will be assigned two clinical placements: one in a high school for observation hours and consultation with a field-based faculty mentor; and one in an elementary school for a practicum teaching experience with a mentor teacher and a college supervisor. Additional work aligned with the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards criteria will be required. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 519. Prerequisite: Education 413 and 415 with a grade of B- or better and second year MAT licensure candidate status.
    EDUC 422

 

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  • ENGL 101: Writing Tutorial
    An expository writing course for students identified by the director of writing programs. (Does not apply toward the major. Not open to upperclass students. Does not meet GEC Humanities Requirement.)
  • ENGL 110: Literary Studies
    Designed to introduce prospective majors to English studies. Primarily for first-year students but also for others who wish to acquire useful skills as readers and writers by developing critical abilities in studying literature. This course offers students an introduction to specific subject areas in the literary canon and contemporary texts. (Counts as an elective for the English major, Literature Track. Meets GEC First-Year Writing Requirement.)
  • ENGL 111: Intro to Prof Writing
    (Introduction to Professional Writing) This course introduces students to the kind of writing they may encounter in the work world by exploring the rhetorical principles, writing strategies, and information-mapping practices necessary for producing organized, readable documents - from traditional print business letters and reports to email correspondence and social-media text. This course will provide the tools to effectively gather and refine information, organize it in reader-friendly fashion, and adapt it for the appropriate audience and genre. Students will also hone an economical, direct prose style, which is standard for effective professional writing. No prerequisites.
  • ENGL 112: Intro to Editing and Publishing
    Introduction to Editing and Publishing. Designed to introduce students to the sorts of questions that arise in contemporary publishing. Primarily for students who wish to acquire useful skills as editors and writers for both campus and professional publications, including print and electronic magazines, journals, or books. Among the topics covered in this course: editorial workflow; copyediting, fact checking, and proofreading; contracts and copyright; working with authors; and marketing and publicity. In order to best use these practical skills, we also look at the differences implicit in various publishing environments (including print and electronic) and the fundamental relationships between author and audience that determine the shape of the text. Prerequisites: No prerequisites Corequisites: No corequisites
  • ENGL 135: Creative Writing
    A beginning course in the art of writing fiction, poetry, and nonfiction prose. Literary analysis will be combined with creative assignments. Group discussions and individual conferences. (Not open to students who have completed English 235.)
  • ENGL 180: Religion, SciFi, and Fantasy
    (Religion, Science Fiction, Fantasy) Of the literary genres, perhaps science fiction and fantasy best allow creative artists to imagine real and possible answers to the deep religious questions that have historically driven philosophers, theologians, and thinkers. Who are we? What do we want? Where did we come from? How does everything end? What is the meaning of life, the universe, and everything? In this class we examine science fiction and fantasy short stories, motion pictures, novels, and television programs to ask how creative artists and wider society have asked and answered these questions. We also consider how science fiction and fantasy have commented on and mirrored real-world religions. No prerequisites. Intended for first-year students and sophomores only.
    RELG 180
  • ENGL 203: Early American Literature
    A survey of early American literature including Native American oral stories and trickster tales, Puritan literature, Smith and Pocahontas accounts, captivity narratives, voices of nationalism, early slave narratives, and women's letters.
    AMER 203
  • ENGL 204: Nineteenth Century American Lit
    Works of representative writers: Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Thoreau, Emerson, Whitman, Dickinson, and Twain. Topics of discussion include Emerson's influence on American culture, developments in American literary form, and themes of American community and nature.
    AMER 204
  • ENGL 205: Twentieth Century American Lit
    Works of representative writers. Topics of discussion include American identity and the 'American dream,' developments in literary form, and the social and political values of modern literature.
    AMER 205
  • ENGL 206: American Environmental Lit
    An historically organized survey of the various rhetorics through which nature has been understood by Americans from the Puritans to contemporary writers: the Calvinist fallen landscape, the rational continent of the American Enlightenment, conservation and 'wise use,' and preservation and 'biodiversity.'
    AMER 206, ES 206
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  • ENGL 207: Literature of Place: Chicago
    This course will examine Chicago history and literature by privileging its location. In other words, we will consider the city and its environs as central characters in the stories we study, moving through the history of the region with a narrative lens. This method will suggest the ever-changing character traits of Chicago as it develops from Pottawatomie war plain to fur trading post to early mercantile settlement to booming and (for a time) busting metropolis. We will begin with accounts of the Joliet expedition along with narratives of early settlers to the region. Other readings will draw from classic works by Jane Addams, Theodore Dreiser, John Dos Passos, Richard Wright, and Saul Bellow, Thomas Pynchon, Joe Meno, and Stuart Dybek, among others. Additionally, these narratives will be read in the context of theoretical offerings in ecocriticism. Students should keep Friday afternoons free for a series of field trips, to be scheduled well in advance.
    ES 207, AMER 207
  • ENGL 210: Ancient and Medieval Literature
    The origins of Western literary tradition traced through such classic figures as Homer, Virgil, and Dante. A survey of major English literary texts, culminating in Chaucer. (Meets GEC First-Year Writing Requirement.)
  • ENGL 211: English Literature I
    The continuation of the Classics of Literature Sequence, focusing on such major figures as Shakespeare, Milton, Swift, and Pope seen against the developments and traditions of the two periods. Prerequisite: English 210, or permission of instructor.
  • ENGL 212: English Literature II
    The third in the Classics of Literature Sequence, from the Romantics through Modernism, seen against the developments and traditions of the last two centuries. Prerequisite: English 210 and English 211, or permission of instructor.
  • ENGL 216: African American Literature I
    A study of slave narratives and contemporary revisions. Includes works by Equiano, Douglass, Delaney, Jacobs, Morrison, Johnson, and Williams. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    AFAM 216, AMER 216
  • ENGL 217: African American Literature II
    An examination of narrative attempts before, during, and after the Harlem Renaissance to move from imposed stereotypes toward more accurate representations of African American experiences. Includes works by Chesnutt, Du Bois, Hurston, Larsen, Hughes, Toomer, Baldwin, and Walker. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    AFAM 217, AMER 217
  • ENGL 218: Blues Women in African Amer Lit
    An analysis of the representation of 'blues women' and the music in writings by African Americans. Authors include Larsen, Hurston, Morrison, Wilson, Jones, and Walker. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    AFAM 218, AMER 218, GSWS 218
  • ENGL 220: Shakespeare
    Selected plays to show Shakespeare's artistic development; intensive analysis of major plays.
    THTR 236
  • ENGL 221: Literature and Medicine
    This course will introduce students to literary narratives about illness, disease, and healing written by patients, physicians, and others. We will read texts that explore various aspects of this genre including: the interactions between patients and doctors; the naming of illness or disease and the attendant experience, evolution, and therapy; and interpretation by patient, doctor, and reader.
  • ENGL 224: Literature of the Vietnam War
    This course examines the Vietnam War as refracted through various literary genres. The readings for the course include Graham Greene's The Quiet American, Tim O'Brien's The Things They Carried, and Truong Nhu Tang's Vietcong Memoir. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    AMER 224, ASIA 224
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  • ENGL 225: Remixes in a Post-Burroughs World
    This .5-credit seminar will explore the legacy of cut-ups, remix, and avant-culture strategies connected to the legacy of William S. Burroughs (1914-1997) and his collaborators. While the course will pay particular attention to the outsized influence of Burroughs in contemporary aesthetics, we will freely investigate cut-ups, mash-ups, remixes, dj culture, user-generated content, conceptual literature, crowdsourcing, social media, and related strategies in publishing and aesthetics that together produce a collaborative critique of Romantic definitions of authorship and genius. In these domains, we will cover everything from Girl Talk to "Auto-Tune the News" to _Star Wars: Uncut_ to what's happening tomorrow, all through the lens of user-based textual interventions. Lecture, discussion, and appropriation-based responses in hard copy and digital forms. No prerequisites. Course begins on the first day of classes after mid-semester break.
  • ENGL 227: The Literary Magazine in America
    For well over a century, literary publishing in America has relied on constellation of magazines both large and small to cultivate and disseminate the work of poets and prose writers. Between 1912 - when Chicago's Poetry magazine was founded - and 1950, over 600 were begun, and by the end of the twentieth century that number grew into the thousands. What role did these magazines play in shaping our literary history? How do they continue to function in our own time alongside the internet and new media? What is their future? This course will guide students through the history, editorial process, and technology of literary publishing by focusing on the evolution of Poetry magazine and its past and present contemporaries. It will include examination of historically significant archival materials as well as practical explorations of the day-to-day workflows of state-of-the art journal editing and publishing.
  • ENGL 228: Women Writing Women
    This course will survey selected women writers, in diverse genres past and present, with a focus on American women in the 20th and 21st centuries. Writers may include: Muriel Rukeyser, Adrienne Rich, Maxine Hong Kingston, Louise Erdrich, Gloria Anzaldua, and Jamaica Kincaid, as well as women writing in recent genres like creative nonfiction, memoir, and transgender fiction. We will explore questions such as: Does the diversity of American women in terms of race, ethnicity, sexuality, and gender identification trouble the very concept of 'U.S. women writers'? What are ways that women have defined and undermined the concept of 'woman' in their writing? (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    AMER 228, GSWS 228
  • ENGL 229: Selfies and Drones
    This .5-credit seminar will explore these two interrelated contemporary topics, with particular focus on ideas of automation and remote control. We will explore "drone" as an umbrella term not only for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV), which run from children's toys to weapons of war, but also as technological "noise" that increasingly confronts us in our daily lives. In this, we will look to representation of automation in literature, in texts such as Galatea 2.2 by Richard Powers. Similarly, the "selfie" is not only the picture one takes on a smart phone, but also a current mode of representation that has significant literary and visual antecedents in portraiture and autobiography. Accordingly, course "texts" may include everything from The Picture of Dorian Gray, to a selfie stick, to industrial drone music, although the dominant lens of the course will be literary. No prerequisites. Course begins on the first day of classes after mid-semester break.
  • ENGL 230: Hist Drama I: Greeks to Shakespeare
    (History of Drama I: Greeks to Shakespeare to Moliere) This required course for theater majors examines the history of drama and theater from its origins in religious ritual of ancient Greece to the productions of Shakespeare's London and Moliere's Paris. In addition to in-depth study of plays, emphasis is placed on acting styles, production techniques, stage and auditorium architecture, and the socio-political milieu that formed the foundation of the theater of each culture and period. Offered yearly.
    THTR 230
  • ENGL 232: The Teaching of Writing

  • ENGL 233: Performance Art
    This course will provide students with an understanding of performance art as a constantly evolving and flexible medium. The class will trace the emergence and development of performance art as a form of expression both distinct from and yet dependent upon traditional and experimental forms of theater and other contemporary manifestations of theatricality. Students will negotiate, through reading, research, discussion and planning and practical application, the blurred boundaries between performing and living, entertainment and art.
    THTR 224, ART 237
  • ENGL 234: Hist Drama II: Modern Contemporary
    (History of Drama II: Modern and Contemporary) This required course for theater majors examines the history of drama and theater from the late nineteenth-century plays of Ibsen and Chekhov up until the present day. In addition to in-depth study of plays, this course explores the conventions of acting and stagecraft and cultural conditions that influenced each period's theater.
    THTR 231
  • ENGL 236: 20th Cent Theater: Musical Theater
    A study of representative musical comedies, operettas, and related works that will provide topics for papers by students. Emphasis will be placed on relationship to political, social, and cultural events. Videotapes of musicals are viewed and discussed. Among works to be discussed are Show Boat, Oklahoma!, South Pacific, My Fair Lady, Hair, Jesus Christ Superstar, A Little Night Music, Sunday in the Park with George, and others.
    AMER 236, MUSC 235
  • ENGL 239: Shakespeare on Film
    This course will focus on major cinematic adaptations of Shakespeare's plays, with attention both to the original texts and to the process of transferring them to the new medium by film directors. We will pay special attention to plays that have been filmed a number of times, so that we can develop useful comparisons: Richard III (Olivier, Loncraine), Romeo and Juliet (Zeffirelli, Luhrmann, Shakespeare in Love), Henry V (Olivier, Branagh), Hamlet (Olivier, Zeffirelli, Almereyda), and Macbeth (Polanski, Kurzel). Major goals will be to develop our ability to do close readings of both the original texts and the films, to do creative film adaptation projects, and to develop effective ways of expressing both our analytical and our creative ideas. No prerequisites.
    THTR 240, CINE 240
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  • ENGL 240: Theater Criticism
    An intensive course on reading and writing brief, journalistic play critiques designed to help theatergoers make informed consumer decisions. Attention to journalistic basics and issues of individual sensibility and taste. Class writings will be considered for campus publications. No prerequisites.
    THTR 257
  • ENGL 241: African American Drama & Theater
    This course surveys the work African American theater artists from the nineteenth century to the present day. Playwrights surveyed may include Richardson, Hughes, Hansberry, Childress, Bullins, Baraka, Fuller, Wilson, Cleage, Shange, and Parks. Readings are supplemented by field trips to Chicago theaters that feature African American plays. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    THTR 241, AFAM 241
  • ENGL 242: Playwriting
    This course focuses on the collaboration between director, designers, and playwright in the creation and production of new works for the stage. Projects will include writing, script analysis, casting, and presentation of original student works and/or student-adapted works by professional authors. Offered every other year.
    THTR 270
  • ENGL 245: Novel Writing Boot Camp
    An intensive course focusing on the craft of novel writing. Students will study the novel form and the possibilities and frameworks of different genres of fiction and hybrid prose. Students will draft their own novels and develop plans for completing their manuscripts and submitting them to publishers within the framework of the course. Group discussions and individual conferences. Prerequisites: None, though ENGL 135 is recommended.
  • ENGL 250: Contemporary Lit
    This course will examine literary texts that address questions of ideology and the marketplace, and it will include diverse multicultural literary perspectives.
  • ENGL 251: Grateful Dead and American Culture
    More than fifty years after the band?s founding, the Grateful Dead looms larger than ever. From Haight-Ashbury acid-testers to visionary entrepreneurs, the band that grew up and out of the revolutions of the tumultuous 1960s found a way to mix everything from roots music to free jazz to rock into an "endless tour" that put them in the Fortune 500. The Grateful Dead provided a cultural soundtrack for not only the 1960s, but also the paranoia of the Watergate years, the Reagan-soaked 1980s, and on to the jam-band present. This course will focus on the band?s performance of authentic "Americanness" throughout its half century run. We'll listen to their music, and also to their fans, enthusiasts, and scholars. We'll understand the various subcultures that separate the sixties and now, and in doing so, offer answers to this key question: Why do the Dead survive? (Elective for English, Theater, and Music)
    AMER 200, MUSC 222, THTR 206
  • ENGL 252: Bookbinding for Artists and Authors
    This course will provide a practical introduction to a variety of bookbinding techniques, from Japanese and pamphlet bindings to hard-cover case binding, in addition to portfolio and presentation box construction. Students will produce both unique books and small-run multiples of original literary and/or visual work, according to their curricular focus. Special emphasis will be placed on how the poetry, prose, drawings and prints students produce for this course can best be presented in the format of their handmade books. Prerequisites: No prerequisites Corequisites: No corequisites
    ART 252
  • ENGL 253: Modern Irish Writers
    A course in Irish fiction, poetry, and drama of the twentieth century, including works by Joyce, Beckett, Yeats, and Synge. We will explore questions of nationalism, language, and modernism in Irish literature and will consider the works in historical contexts.
  • ENGL 255: Dramaturgy
    An introduction to the role of the dramaturg within the theatrical production process. Includes readings by and about dramaturgs and hands-on experience in the following areas of dramaturgical pursuit: evaluating new scripts; creating a production-specific 'protocol' (research compendium); analyzing and preparing a script for rehearsal; serving as an 'in-house critic'; collaborating with directors, designers, and actors; creating and running educational programs for school and adult audiences; rehearsal functions and decorum; documentation techniques.
    THTR 255
  • ENGL 262: The History of the Book and Beyond
    This course will investigate the links between new media and electronic writing and publishing in terms of the rich history of one of the modern world's most robust technologies: the printed book. Starting with the Guttenberg printing press and its revolutionary productions through a culture considerably abbreviated on the Kindle's e-screen, this course will ask this key question. Is the printed book really on its deathbed, and what, if anything, will emerge to take its place? This course will draw freely from the last seven centuries, making much, for instance, of texts such as Tristram Shandy's famous "marbled page" (individual to each volume), the Newberry Library's convict narrative bound in human skin, the popular Dante's Inferno video game, and the "twitterature" version of Moby Dick. This course has no prerequisites, but is suited best for students with some interest or experience in the literary tradition from 1450 to the present.
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  • ENGL 263: Nobel Laureates in Literature
    What do the books Voices from Chernobyl: The Oral History of a Nuclear Disaster (1997); Thinking, Fast and Slow (2011); Strength to Love (1963); The Passport (1986); and Chance and Necessity (1994) all have in common? First, they are all written by Nobel Prize winners; second, they all tell different parts of the wide-sweeping story of the human desire for political, intellectual, scientific, and social freedom during the twentieth century up to today. In this course we will trace how freedom and humanity have been changed, challenged, and charged by Nobel Prize winners in literature, economics and social science, physiology (medicine), and physics. Our laureates will reveal to us how genetic structures, our place in the universe, economic and political oppression, class, national origin, tragedy, and the pursuit of freedom reveal some of the most important, current views on our common humanity. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • ENGL 264: The Beat Generation
    (The Beat Generation: Influences and Legacy.) The core members of the group of writers known as the Beats?Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, and William S. Burroughs?have had a profound influence on the development of postwar American literary and artistic culture. In this course students will be introduced to some of the Beats' major predecessors (notably William Blake, Walt Whitman, and William Carlos Williams) as well as writers whose work has brought the Beat legacy into the twenty-first century (Anne Waldman, Roberto Bolaño, Amiri Baraka, Eileen Myles, and others). Students will read these writers with an eye toward their contributions to such topics as LGBT rights, the environmental movement, the introduction of Buddhism and Eastern philosophy to the United States, and postmodern cut-up and sampling techniques. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • ENGL 285: Creative Arts Entrepreneurship
    Creative Arts Entrepreneurship will offer an overview of the processes, practices, and decision-making activities that lead to the realization of our creative ideas. Students from across the humanities, arts, sciences, and business will learn the unique contexts and challenges of creative careers, with an emphasis on collaborative projects. The course will help students understand the nature and structure of arts enterprise while cultivating their own career vision and creative goals. Creative Arts Entrepreneurship is designed for students interested in developing, launching, or advancing innovative enterprises in arts, culture, and design, and those who love the initiative, ingenuity and excitement of putting creative ideas into action. The course combines readings and in-class discussions with site visits, case studies, guest lectures by working artists and creative professionals, and student-driven projects. No prerequisites.
    MUSC 285, ENTP 285, ART 285, THTR 285
  • ENGL 290: Internship
    The course presents an opportunity to read in a comparatist manner major novels which are of great interest both in their own right and as creative expressions of the symbolic, psychological and philosophical potential of the family and its generational fortunes as a novelistic theme. In addition to placing these works in their historical contexts and in the continuum of the early modern and modernist traditions of the genre, close readings and discussions will uncover the symbolic meanings and psychological, often philosophical insights that lead novelists to illuminate the family and its fateful variations as a metaphor for historical process and the constellation of determinants, social, ideological, political and otherwise, that contribute to their genesis. Possible readings include Flaubert, Madame Bovary; Bellow, Herzog, Humboldt's Gift; Dickens, Great Expectations; Eugenides, Middlesex; Faulkner, As I Lay Dying, The Sound and the Fury; Forster, Howards End; Mann, Buddenbrooks; Dostoevsky, Brothers Karamazov; Tolstoi, Anna Karenina; Hesse, Narziss and Goldmund; Marquez, One Hundred Years of Solitude; Kureishi, Buddha of Suburbia; Morrison, Song of Solomon; Smiley, A Thousand Acres; Steinbeck, East of Eden; Staples, Parallel Time; Franzen, The Corrections.
  • ENGL 302: John Donne
    Literature of the earlier seventeenth century with close study of works by Donne, Herbert, Jonson, Burton, Browne, and others in the baroque tradition. Prerequisites: English 210 and 211.
  • ENGL 304: Romantic Period
    Key works, both poetry and prose, of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Lamb, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. Exploration of themes and ideas of a revolutionary era. Prerequisite: English 212.
  • ENGL 305: Victorian Literature
    Masterpieces of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry by Dickens, Tennyson, Browning, Carlyle, Arnold, Hardy, Wilde, and others. Prerequisite: English 212.
  • ENGL 306: 19th-Century British Novel
    This course will explore the flowering of the novel in England in the nineteenth century, with attention to the novel?s development of "literary realism" and its shifting interplay with Romanticism, the novel's increasingly sophisticated orchestration of sub-genres (bildungsroman, essay, letter, gothic tale, among others), its refraction of nineteenth-century social and cultural upheavals, and its response to changing publication practices and a growing readership. Depending on the semester?s emphasis, the course may focus on one illustrative British novelist from this period or compare several novelists, including but not limited to Austen, Scott, Shelley, the Brontes, Dickens, Gaskell, Eliot, and Hardy. Prerequisite: Any 200-level English course or permission of instructor.
  • ENGL 307: Novel Origins
    This course will focus on the beginnings of the novel in England, particularly its evolution and influence with regard to both internal and external literary forces (classical and contemporary) during the eighteenth and very early nineteenth centuries. Authors will include Cervantes and Sterne, and may include other authors ranging from Heliodorus to Burney, and Voltaire to Scott. Prerequisite: Any 200-level English course or permission of instructor.
    (Not open to students who have completed ENGL 333.)
  • ENGL 308: Renaissance Drama
    Who were the other popular playwrights of Shakespeare's day? Have they been overshadowed by the Bard's fame? In this course we will discuss, watch films of, and stage scenes from the vibrant and stage-worthy plays of the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries in England, including the witty comedies of Jonson and Dekker, and the horrific tragedies of Kyd, Marlowe, Marston, Middleton, Tourneur, Webster, and Ford. The course will culminate in a discussion of the film Shakespeare in Love, which portrays playwrights, actors, managers, and other historical figures of the English Renaissance.
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  • ENGL 309: The Chaucerian Tradition
    This course will focus on Chaucer's Canterbury Tales by enabling students to read the work in its entirety. Students will explore the intellectual debates on marriage and women that Chaucer's tales engage; the religious and ethical framework of his tales (with special emphasis on Augustine and Boethius); his variations on the 'estates satire' tradition and his play with other popular medieval genres; and his transformation of continental literary sources (including source study of Boccaccio, Petrarch, and Jean de Meun/Guillaume de Lorris, among others). Prerequisite: English 210. (Not open to students who have taken ENGL 300: Medieval Studies: The Chaucerian Tradition)
  • ENGL 310: The Arthurian Tradition
    This course will explore the medieval tradition of Arthurian literature. The first half of the course will be devoted to the medieval roots of the Arthurian legend, from chronicle history to courtly romance, with readings ranging from Gildas to Malory. The second half of the course will consider the reception of this medieval mythic tradition by later British writers from the Renaissance to the present. Writers representing that tradition of medievalism might include Spenser, Tennyson, Morris, T.H. White, Murdoch, and Winterson, among others. Prerequisite: English 210. (Not open to students who have taken ENGL 300: Medieval Studies: The Arthurian Tradition.)
  • ENGL 311: Hidden Chicago
    (Hidden Chicago: Culture, Class, Conflict). This course will explore specific aspects of Chicago 'hidden' away, either deliberately or accidently, as well as those simply effaced by time. To this end, we will look at 4 specific erasures that may include: 1) Fairs: The Colombian Exposition of 1893 (U of C and Jackson Park) and the 1933 Century of Progress Exhibition (Northerly Island); 2) Utopias and religious communities: the company town of Pullman and the early history of the Nation of Islam (and possible links to the jazz musician Sun Ra); 3) Public Housing and the Black Belt: The 'ghettos in the sky' that formerly dominated South State Street, and the period of black migration; the Chicago Defender; Richard Wright's novel Native Son and 4) Popular Myths and Movements: the city before the 1871 fire, the Potawatomie fur-trading era, the 'pirate' of Streeterville, various 'vice' districts, gangland Chicago, the House Music movement, etc.

    This field course will take students out of the classroom whenever possible. Or, put another way, the city shall be our classroom. The course texts will be both literary and historical in nature.

    AMER 311
  • ENGL 312: Black Metropolis
    (Black Metropolis: A Study of Black Life in Chicago). This course is a study of race and urban life in Chicago. From the founding of Chicago by a black man to the participation of blacks in the rebuilding of the city following the Great Chicago fire, and into an exploration of Bronzeville, 'a city within a city,' this course will highlight blacks and their contributions to this great city. Study of landmark texts, documentaries, novels, and photography, along with at least one field trip to the Chicago area, will reveal the impact of the Great Migration on the city; contributions of talented musicians, writers, and photographers involved in the Chicago Renaissance; and the origins of the famous black Chicago newspaper, the Chicago Defender, including its regular column by Langston Hughes. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    AFAM 312, AMER 312
  • ENGL 316: Voices of Reform
    A study of African American literature and theory published immediately before and following the Civil War. Readings will focus on identity (re)formation, social order, morality, Northern neo-slavery, institution building, women's rights. Authors will include Booker T. Washington, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Anna Julia Cooper, Harriet Wilson, Frances E.W. Harper, William Wells Brown, Sojourner Truth, Charles Chesnutt, and Frederick Douglass. English 216 is the prerequisite for first-year students and sophomores; no prerequisite for juniors and seniors. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • ENGL 321: Modern Fiction
    An exploration of modern fiction as it developed in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including such writers as Dostoevsky, Joyce, Lawrence, Kafka, and Hemingway. Prerequisite: any 200-level literature course.
  • ENGL 322: Modern Poetry
    Major figures in English and American poetry of the twentieth century. Prerequisite: any 200-level literature course.
  • ENGL 323: LFC Press/&NOW BOOKS
    This course will involve students in the work of Lake Forest College Press with particular focus on the biennial book, The &NOW AWARDS: The Best Innovative Writing. The course will focus on all stages of the editorial, production, and publicity process. The entire class will meet once per week, and students will engage in independent and small-group sessions with the instructor as they pursue practical, directed publishing-related projects. Prerequisite: Any one of the following: English 111, 112. 135, or permission of instructor.
  • ENGL 324: LFC Press: Plonsker Prize
    This course will involve students in work of Lake Forest College Press/&NOW Books, focusing on the annual Madeleine P. Plonsker Emerging Writers' Residency Prize. Students will explore questions of literary quality through the robust analysis of course texts drawn from the prize's large applicant pool. These works-in-process suggest the possibilities for contemporary writing and publishing; students will learn how a winning manuscript may become a fully realized book, and will have the opportunity to directly influence this process. This course will not only allow students to become editors, but will also explore the larger context of what it means to edit, to judge, and to shape a literary text as the start of the winner's literary career. The entire class will meet once per week, while students also engage in small-group sessions with the instructor as they pursue practical, directed publishing-related projects that will inform the College's publishing initiatives. Prerequisite: Any one of the following: English 111, 112, 135, any twentieth-century-focused literature course, or permission of the instructor.

  • ENGL 325: Black Literature of the 60s
    (Black Literature of the 60s and its Legacy.) A study of the literature produced by major participants in the Black Arts and Civil Rights movements, along with an examination of writings after the 60s to determine the legacy of the themes of protest and social change. Authors may include Amiri Baraka, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King Jr., Haki Madhubuti, Sonia Sanchez, Assata Shakur, Eldridge Cleaver, Gil Scott-Heron, Angela Davis, Tupac Shakur, Jay Z, M.K. Asante, Jr., Common, Ice Cube, Lupe Fiasco, among others. Prerequisite: English 217 or permission of the instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)

    AFAM 325, AMER 325
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  • ENGL 326: Postmodernism
    An interdisciplinary study of postmodernism as a literary and cultural phenomenon that redefines both local and global communities. The course will investigate aesthetic production during the post-WWII period by American and world writers and artists, with an additional focus on the theoretical basis of postmodernism.
  • ENGL 327: Comedy Writing
    This course teaches the art of writing comedic sketches for both live theatre and film. The course will employ literary analysis combined with creative assignments, group discussions and individual conferences, along with workshops and guided revisions. Students will learn to brainstorm ideas, write dialogue, and understand elements of storytelling, while also creating political and social satire, physical comedy, parody, and other comedic forms. The course will provide regular opportunities to perform in front of audiences as part of the feedback/review process. Prerequisite: ENGL 135 or THTR 226 or permission of the instructor.
    THTR 326
  • ENGL 328: Diasporan Writings
    (Diasporan Writings from Contemporary Black Writers). This course presents stories by immigrants of African descent from throughout the Caribbean as well as African writers, and significant writings by American authors of African descent. These works will illustrate the scope and variety of aesthetic, cultural, and political concerns that have motivated the authors. Course may include Jamaica Kincaid, Edwidge Danticat, Michelle Cliff, Paule Marshall, George Lamming, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Ngugi wa Thiong'o, Tsitsi Dangarembga, J. Nozipo Maraire, Edward P. Jones, Suzan Lori-Parks, Natasha Tretheway, Rita Dove, Walter Mosley, M. K. Asante. Authors will vary with different semesters. Prerequisite: ENGL/AFAM 216 or 217 or permission of Instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement.)
    AFAM 328
  • ENGL 329: Advanced Publishing
    This course will provide students with hands-on experience in all stages of the editorial and publishing process from project selection to production to publicity, by involving them directly in the work of Lake Forest College Press / &NOW Books. Past advanced publishing projects have included the editing and production of The &NOW Awards anthology and editing and publicizing books by winners of the Madeline P. Plonsker Emerging Writers Residency Prize. The entire course will permit students to work in small, entrepreneurial-focused groups as they explore traditional publishing areas as well as marketing, communication, web presentation/design, blogging, and social media. Prerequisite: One of the following: JOUR 120 (formerly COMM 120), ENGL 111, 112, 135, any 20th-century focused literature course, or permission of the instructor.
  • ENGL 336: British Women Writers
    This course will focus on British women novelists of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Studying them within their historical and literary context, we will explore the following topics: 1) how women writers address questions of female authorship and authority, 2) how they define their female identity in relation to society, nature, and/or the divine, and 3) how they navigate economic, social, religious, and cultural constraints. British writers to be studied might include Jane Austen, Anne and Charlotte Bronte, Elizabeth Gaskell, George Eliot, Virginia Woolf, Elizabeth Bowen, Iris Murdoch, A. S. Byatt, Jeanette Winterson, and Zadie Smith. Prerequisite: English 210, or permission of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • ENGL 337: Women in Theater
    (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • ENGL 338: Renaissance Humanism
    This course will examine how humanism evolved during the early modern period (1374-1667). Particular emphasis will be given to literature from France, Italy, Holland and Germany in the first half of the course; while in the second, we will concentrate entirely on literature from England. This approach will show how early modern English literature evolves in correlation with and correspondence to continental characteristics of humanism. In particular, we will explore the works of authors such as Petrarch, Boccaccio, Erasmus, More, Luther, Rabelais, Montaigne, Calvin, Spenser, Nashe, Shakespeare, Bacon, Browne, Herbert, Vaughn, and Milton. Prerequisite: ENGL 211 or permission of the instructor.
  • ENGL 345: 19th Century American Novels
    A seminar-style discussion of nineteenth-century American novels both outside and within the traditional canon. Topics to be examined will include the dynamic form of the novel, the schools of romance, realism, and naturalism, as well as themes of the city, American history, and American identity.
  • ENGL 346: Jewish-American Literature
    An historically organized reading of Jewish-American writers from Mordecai Noah and Emma Lazarus to Jonathan Safran Foer and Nathan Englander, the course will consider themes of assimilation, tradition, captialism, and anti-semitism in texts in English, as well as translations from Yiddish and perhaps Ladino. To what extent is Jewish-American literature an intact and coherent tradition? How have these texts registered a narrative of American history, and how have they defined, and perhaps reified, a version of Jewish-American identity? The chief texts of the class will be novels, but there will be readings in poetry and memoir as well. Prerequisite: English 204 or English 205 or permission of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)

  • ENGL 351: Gender and Literature
    This course examines the social practices, the economic/political environment, and the religious beliefs of the late nineteenth century. It shows how culture, history, and gender influenced women authors and their audiences. Authors include Alcott, Chopin, Gilman, Wharton, and others. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement. Prerequisite: English 204.)
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  • ENGL 360: Fiction Writing
    An intermediate course in the craft of the short story. Group discussions and individual conferences. Prerequisite: English 135.
  • ENGL 361: Poetry Writing
    An intermediate course in the craft of poetry. Group discussions and individual conferences. Prerequisite: English 135 or 235.
  • ENGL 362: New Media/Electronic Writing
    The practitioner of new media and electronic writing is an author who combines human language and computer code to create new kinds of literary experience. Works of electronic literature can exceed the possibilities of print in their scale, dynamic variability, visual and temporal qualities, and attentiveness to the reader. The environment of the network (internet) also provides new opportunities for collaboration and sampling of found material. In this writing studio, we will survey varied forms of electronic literature including interactive hypertext / hypermedia, multi-user environments, codeworks, e-poetry, writing for virtual reality, and text-driven digital performance. Students will engage the potential of computational literature by creating original works using a variety of web- based programming languages taught in the weekly sessions. No previous programming experience is required. Students are required to have regular access to a laptop computer.
  • ENGL 364: Creative Unwriting & Remix Workshop
    This intermediate writing course explores the principles behind a broad range of contemporary innovative writing methods and styles including remix, mash-up, conceptual, uncreation (a la Kenny Goldsmith), and cut-up techniques. The course starts from the principle that writers do not start with a blank page. Rather, all writing is created from the substance of preexisting artworks. For a generation more familiar with turntables and text messaging than the traditions of classical poetics, this course will explore the former in the context of the latter, offering a philosophical base from which to create, or uncreate, works that respond most deftly to contemporary aesthetics. Prerequisite: ENGL 235 or permission of the instructor.
  • ENGL 365: Poetry and Nature
    This course explores the long history of poetry and its relationship to the natural world, from its roots in Classical Asian and European poetry to its postmodern manifestations. Understanding the natural processes that served as inspiration and subject matter of nature poetry will enrich student understanding of the poem as work of literature and also the poetry-writing process. If enrolled in ES 365, students will respond to the poems with literary and natural history analysis; if enrolled in ENGL 365, students will respond with their own poetry and creative writing. Prerequisite: One 200-level English course or 200-level Environmental Studies course.
    ES 365
  • ENGL 367: Environmental Writing
    This course focuses on writing about the environment. Students will explore different approaches to the environmental essay, including adventure narrative, personal reflection, and natural history. Poetry and fiction will also play a role as we explore the practice of place-centered writing. We will also use the immediate surroundings of the Chicago area as an environment for our writing. Prerequisite: English 135/235 or a lower-level Environmental Studies course. Not open to students who have completed ENGL 332.
    ES 367
  • ENGL 368: Advanced Nonfiction Writing
    An intermediate course in the craft of creative nonfiction that may include the memoir, personal essay, literary journalism, lyric essay, visual essay, and digital essay. Group discussions and individual conferences. Prerequisite: English 135. (Not open to students who have completed ENGL 330.)
  • ENGL 369: Professional Writing
    (Professional Writing in the Digital Age). This course will focus on the development of creative and effective digital personas for websites, resumes and blogs, with special emphasis on the application of these personas in publishing and literary-based careers. Writing these personas will prepare students for the larger post-baccalaureate world of applications, interviews, and career building. In a dedicated writing workshop environment, students will design and maintain a blog, establish and develop an online identity, construct a professional portfolio, practice job hunting, engage in the interview process, learn about grants and scholarships, and generally develop the public writing skills needed to enter the twenty-first century professional and publishing world. Prerequisites: English 111, English 135 or permission of instructor.
  • ENGL 385: Topics 20th Cent: GLBT Voices
    This class will study the recent flourishing of gay, lesbian, and transgender voices in theater. We'll look at various styles of activism and performance, from farce to realism, to camp/ drag, to 'queer' theater. Figures to be discussed include Charles Ludlam, Harvey Fierstein, Larry Kramer, William Hoffmann, Paula Vogel, Paul Rudnick, Tony Kushner, Jane Chambers, and Holly Hughes. (Cross-listed as THTR 235 and WOMN 235. Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)

    WOMN 235
  • ENGL 391: Tutorial
    In this writing-intensive course, students exercise their interviewing, investigative and story-telling skills to produce a variety of magazine articles that will be posted--along with digital photos--on their own journalism blogs. Prerequisite: English 231.
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  • ENGL 392: Publishing Practicum
    (Publishing Practicum: Theory/Design Production) This practicum allows a student to study print and digital design through the completion of required readings, response papers (in electronic media), and weekly meetings with the supervising faculty member. Beyond this, the student engages in a practicum component of ten hours per week in Visual Communications as a supplement to the course's theoretical work. In this capacity, the student engages in targeted design projects that reinforce the academic aspects of the practicum. The student benefits from the professional mentoring of our graphic design staff, and uses the Adobe Design Suite, in preparation for a publishing-industry career. Readings may include The Books to Come by Alan Loney, and From Gutenberg to Opentype by Robin Dodd. Prerequisites: ENGL 112, ART 142, and either ENGL 323 or ENGL 324, and permission of instructor.
  • ENGL 400: Herman Melville
    An advanced seminar examining Melville's fiction and poetry in the context of nineteenth-century American culture. Readings will include Typee, Moby Dick, Israel Potter, and 'Battle Pieces.' Prerequisites: English 204 and significant progress in the Classics of Literature Sequence.
  • ENGL 401: John Milton
    An intensive study of the poetry of Milton, with extended attention to Paradise Lost. Emphasis on the classical and Judeo-Christian context of Renaissance culture. Prerequisite: English 210 or 211.
  • ENGL 402: Chaucer
    An advanced course including study of The Canterbury Tales. Emphasis on Chaucer's earlier masterpiece Troilus and Criseyde as well as his dream-vision poems. Prerequisite: English 210.
  • ENGL 403: Emily Dickinson
    An advanced seminar on the poetry and letters of Emily Dickinson. Emphases on the cultural context of Dickinson's work and its critical reception.
    GSWS 403
  • ENGL 404: W. B. Yeats
    William Butler Yeats, one of the most significant poets working in English, writes from a complex cultural situation. His work is deeply connected to Irish nationalism and its cultural manifestation, the Celtic Twilight, as well as to international literary modernism and to a deeply idiosyncratic mysticism. In this course we will study his poetry, prose, and dramatic works in the context of his life and in the context of the literary, cultural, and political movements of his time. In addition, we will read works by some of the writers Yeats influenced, and those who influenced his work, including Ezra Pound and J.M. Synge. Prerequisite: English 212.
  • ENGL 405: J.R.R. Tolkien and the Inklings
    (J.R.R. Tolkien and the Literature of the Inklings.) This seminar will examine the literary legacy of J.R.R. Tolkien and his fellow writers C.S. Lewis, Charles Williams, and Owen Barfield -- all pioneers of the twentieth-century fantasy fiction genre. This course will involve close reading of major works by each author as well as opportunity to discuss the fascinating biographical, historical, aesthetic, and mythic underpinnings of their works. The seminar will pay especial attention to the Inklings' intellectual and artistic indebtedness to the medieval past, to their discourses about religion, politics, and ethics, to their eccentric relationship with "literary modernism," and to the way their fiction refracts major twentieth-century events, particularly World Wars I and II. Prerequisite: ENGL 210 or permission of the instructor.
    RELG 380
  • ENGL 440: Advanced Writing Seminar
    An advanced course in which each student completes a Senior Writing Project (a portfolio of work in poetry, fiction, drama, or nonfiction prose), while interacting with Chicago in two distinct ways: 1) students will generate writing from the study of specific Chicago neighborhoods, and, 2) students will participate in the literary life of the city through attending and staging literary events. Group discussion and individual conferences. Intended for senior majors in the writing track. Prerequisites: (a) English 135; and (b) any 300-level writing course (English 330, 332, 360, 361, 363, or 364), or English 242/Theater 270. (Meets GEC Senior Studies Requirement.)
    AMER 440
  • ENGL 450: Theory of Literature
    Important critical modes and approaches to literature; an integrating experience for the senior major. (Meets GEC Senior Studies Requirement.)

 

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  • ES 108: Environmental Chemistry
    A working knowledge of most environmental issues facing us in the twenty-first century requires an understanding of some key geochemical principles. This course introduces chemistry concepts and skills as they arise in the context of current environmental issues, including chemical cycles in nature, air pollution, ozone depletion, global warming, acid rain, energy sources, water quality, and solid waste. Students will be asked to collect and interpret their own data, as well as to use simple models to explain environmental issues from a scientific perspective. (Meets GEC Natural and Mathematical Sciences Requirement.)
    CHEM 108
  • ES 110: Intro to Environmental Studies
    The environment is not only a natural place filled with trees and pandas, but a matrix in which all human economies and societies are embedded. Solving current environmental problems often involves closing feedback loops between political, social, and economic processes and the ecosystems from which they draw, and which they, in turn impact. For this reason, the scholarly study of environmental issues is inherently interdisciplinary, requiring a sophisticated appreciation not only of science, but also of the humanities and social sciences. This course is an introduction to the multifaceted and interdisciplinary nature of environmental problems and their solutions in today's world. It emphasizes field trips and scientific content, particularly related to understanding biodiversity and ecosystems. It also offers perspectives on environmental issues from the humanities and/or social sciences. Specific topics and content may vary with the professor(s). No prerequisites. Intended for students interested in pursuing the Environmental Studies major.
  • ES 116: Introduction to Geology
    This course will launch participants into the study of Earth's physical history, from the creation of our planet to ways in which geologic processes occur all around us today. Students will learn to identify many different types of rocks, minerals, and fossils, explain the workings of plate tectonics, interpret ancient climates and environments by identifying a single rock, and understand how geologic processes have shaped the face of today's Earth and the life on it. Students will better understand the most important environmental and economic issues facing the world today - the formation, distribution, extraction, and effects of fossil fuels - and gain insight into water movement, access, and pollution. Students will be expected to take a dynamic role in the teaching of materials through presentations and in-class activities. Field trips, including a possible weekend field trip, will be a required part of the class. (Meets GEC Natural and Mathematical Sciences Requirement.)
  • ES 117: Geography and Demography
    The most important issues facing the Earth and its people in the 21st century all have their basis in the geography of the planet, that is, the spatial distribution of land, water, languages, and economic activity. The course will address the following eight geographical concepts: the major forces driving population growth or decline; water scarcity, water pollution, and water management; food production and distribution systems; global flow of people, ideas, products, and resources; the drive toward urbanization and the response of cities to growth; global warming and the ways in which human activities in different regions contribute to greenhouse gas emissions; democratization, the history and current status of the form of government in different regions, how governmental form is tied to the geography; how gender roles influence societies in different regions. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • ES 203: Spring Flora of the Great Lakes
    (Spring Flora of the Western Great Lakes.) This course introduces students to the identification, systematics, ecology, and natural history of the spring flora of the Western Great Lakes. This course includes extensive field work in the greater Chicago area and eastern Wisconsin. Students learn to identify between 150 and 200 species of wildflowers, grasses, trees, shrubs, and other plants, and learn the characteristics of 15 to 20 plant families. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Natural and Mathematical Sciences Requirement.) This Summer Session course in 2016 will be held in the afternoons on Tuesdays and Wednesdays plus full field days on Thursdays and Fridays.
    BIOL 203
  • ES 204: Summer Flora of the Great Lakes
    (Summer Flora of the Western Great Lakes). This course introduces students to the identification, systematics, ecology, and natural history of the summer flora of the Western Great Lakes. This course includes extensive field work in the greater Chicago area, eastern Wisconsin, and Michigan's Upper Peninsula. Students learn to identify between 150 and 200 species of wildflowers, grasses, trees, shrubs, and other plants, and learn the characteristics of 15 to 20 plant families. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Natural and Mathematical Sciences Requirement.) This Summer Session course in 2016 will be held in the afternoons on Mondays and Tuesdays plus full field days on Wednesdays and Thursdays.
    BIOL 204
  • ES 205: Field School: Lake Michigan Flora
    This course introduces students to the identification, systematics, evolution, ecology, and natural history of the summer flora of the land surrounding Lake Michigan. This course is an extensive off-campus three-week field course in Illinois, Wisconsin, Michigan, and Indiana. Students learn to identify between 150 and 200 species of wildflowers, grasses, trees, shrubs, and other plants, and learn the characteristics of 15 to 20 plant families. Additional fee will be assessed. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Natural and Mathematical Sciences Requirement.)
    BIOL 205
  • ES 206: American Environmental Lit
    An historically organized survey of the various rhetorics through which nature has been understood by Americans from the Puritans to contemporary writers: the Calvinist fallen landscape, the rational continent of the American Enlightenment, conservation and "wise use," and preservation and "biodiversity."
    ENGL 206, AMER 206
  • ES 207: Literature of Place: Chicago
    This course will examine Chicago history and literature by privileging its location. In other words, we will consider the city and its environs as central characters in the stories we study, moving through the history of the region with a narrative lens. This method will suggest the ever-changing character traits of Chicago as it develops from Pottawatomie war plain to fur trading post to early mercantile settlement to booming and (for a time) busting metropolis. We will begin with accounts of the Joliet expedition along with narratives of early settlers to the region. Other readings will draw from classic works by Jane Addams, Theodore Dreiser, John Dos Passos, Richard Wright, and Saul Bellow, Thomas Pynchon, Joe Meno, and Stuart Dybek, among others. Additionally, these narratives will be read in the context of theoretical offerings in ecocriticism. Students should keep Friday afternoons free for a series of field trips, to be scheduled well in advance.
    ENGL 207, AMER 207
  • ES 210: Environmental Ethics
    Examination of relationships between human beings and nature, drawing on literature, religion, and natural science as well as philosophy. What views have shaped our current perceptions, concerns, uses, and misuses of the natural world? What creative alternatives can we discover? How can these be applied to the practical problems of environmental ethics?
    PHIL 210
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  • ES 215: Environmental Psychology
    Environmental psychology is the discipline concerned with interactions and relationships between people and their environments (including built, natural, and social environments). In this course we apply psychological methods and theories to a variety of issues and behaviors, considering such topics as landscape preference, wayfinding, weather, noise, natural disasters, territoriality, crowding, and the design of residential and work environments. We also explore images of nature, wilderness, home, and place, as well as the impact of these images on behavior. The course is grounded in empirical work, and incorporates observations and experiences in the local environment. No prerequisite.
    PSYC 215
  • ES 216: Environmental Education
    ES 216: Environmental Education. This course is based on the notion that an environmentally literate populace is important for a healthy and functioning society now and in future generations. With this in mind, this course provides students with an understanding of the environment, including natural history, biology, chemistry, and public policy, and equips them with the skills to pass this knowledge on to others in a variety of educational settings using a variety of methods. Just like the study of the environment, this course pulls from various disciplines in order to provide an introduction to environmental studies and environmental education. The course contains a service learning component that includes working with professional educators. Prerequisites: ES 110 or BIOL 220 Corequisites: No corequisites
  • ES 217: Troubled World Geography
    Human catastrophes and environmental catastrophes are usually deeply interlinked. War, disease, slavery, earthquakes, tsunamis, climate instability, desertification, and deforestation have geographical correlates that we must recognize to understand their causes, consequences, and solutions. This course provides geographic literacy for understanding the political and environmental issues of the 21st century, issues based in geography - based, that is, in the spatial distribution of land, water, languages, and economic activity. We focus on the history of the world's hotspots by examining their climates, topographies, and proximities to politically and environmentally unstable places on the globe. This course examines theories of the relationship of human cultures to geography and suggests ways to recast such theories into modern forms. The troubled spots of the world that we examine include the Middle East, all of Africa, Indonesia, and much of the Americas. The relationship between human cultures and geography is present in all of our investigations. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    IREL 297
  • ES 220: Evolution, Ecology, and Environment
    The diversity of life - the result of evolutionary and ecological processes - is a primary focus of environmental studies. In order to understand humans' effects on other species, ecosystems, and evolutionary and ecological processes and interactions, a deep knowledge of those entities and processes is critical. This course takes an interdisciplinary, theoretical approach to the evolution and ecology of human - environmental dynamics, including species concepts and speciation, extinction, conservation of biodiversity, political ecology, evolutionary ecology, the human dimensions of global change, demography, biogeography, human and non-human population ecology, and the status of evolutionary theory in the current political arena. Three lecture hours plus one four-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: ES 110 or permission of instructor.
  • ES 222: The Lake by the College
    (The Lake by the College: Geography, Ecology, History, and Current Environmental Issues of Lake Michigan). Lake Forest College calls itself the College by the Lake, yet most of us know very little about this vast inland sea. Geography is the study of physical places on the earth's surface and the relationships between people and those places. This course introduces students to the physical properties of the lake and its ecological and economic significance to Chicago, the City of Lake Forest, the Greater Chicagoland region, the United States, and the world. We explore current issues and policies about the lake's diverse and often conflicting uses as a dump site, a highway for transportation, a pristine recreational resource, and the source of our drinking water. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Natural and Mathematical Sciences requirement)
  • ES 223: African American Envirnmntl Culture
    (African American Environmental Culture from Slavery to Environmental Justice). Until the environmental justice movement rose to prominence over the past few decades and invited a more critical perspective on the connection between race and the environment, popular understanding of the American environmental (and environmentalist) tradition had effectively been whitewashed. But why? This course will work to find answers to that question while unearthing the deeper roots of African American environmental culture in conversation with key moments in African American history?from slavery to sharecropping, from migration and urbanization to environmental justice. With an interdisciplinary approach that considers sources as diverse as slave narratives, fiction, poetry, songs, photographs, maps, and ethnographies, we will consider African American intellectuals, writers, visual and musical artists, and everyday citizens not always associated with environmental thought, from W.E.B. Du Bois and Zora Neale Hurston to the Black Panthers and the victims of Flint, Michigan?s, water crisis. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    AFAM 223
  • ES 225: Philosophy of Science
    Examination of issues such as the nature of scientific knowledge, what counts as a "true" scientific theory, the basis of observation, and empirical knowledge. Consideration of ethical issues generated by scientific practice, the politics of technology, and current work on the sociology of scientific knowledge.
    PHIL 225
  • ES 236: Environmental Politics and Policy
    This course provides an overview of environmental politics and policy in the United States, with an emphasis on the ways in which policies are developed and implemented at the local, state, and national levels. Special attention is paid to the diversity of actors that shape environmental outcomes, including legislators, administrators, the science community, civil society, and the private sector. This course examines environmental politics and policy in the United States from the roots of environmental policymaking present at the country's founding through the emergence of the "modern" environmental movement in the post-World War II era that led to the raft of environmental legislation we have today. No prerequisites.
    POLS 237
  • ES 240: Religious Perspectives Environment
    The current environmental crises rest on a layer of philosophical and religious assumptions that are currently being challenged. Are human beings the center of the universe? Is humankind's mandate to dominate nature? Does nature belong to human beings or do human beings belong to nature? Contemporary Judaic, Christian, and Islamic ecological visions and action programs will be considered, along with the religious views and practices of particular native cultures of North and South America, Australia, and Africa. Participants may also discuss ecological perspectives derived from South and East Asian religious cultures. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    RELG 240
  • ES 260: American Environmental History
    Introduction to the historical study of the relationship of Americans with the natural world. Examination of the ways that 'natural' forces helped shape American history; the ways human beings have altered and interacted with nature over time; and the ways cultural, philosophical, scientific, and political attitudes towards the environment have changed in the course of American history, pre-history to the present.
    HIST 232, AMER 261
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  • ES 261: Global Environmental History
    The Earth's environment has changed drastically over time. The first half of this course is a journey through the many phases of environment and climate on Earth in its 4.5-billion-year history from an atmosphere without oxygen to a warm lushly vegetated globe to a world with glaciers pushing toward the equator. In its second half, we will focus on the how environmental changes influenced human history. What was the world like when humans evolved and how did the Ice Ages determine where people migrated? Were the rise and fall of empires tied to the rise and fall of sea level? We will also examine humans as forces that shape and influence the environments they inhabit, for better or for worse. No prerequisite.
  • ES 263: American Cities
    The changing functions, scale, and quality of urban society from the seventeenth century to the present. A historical framework for studying modern American metropolitan problems. Some fieldwork in Chicago.
    HIST 235, AMER 263
  • ES 271: Technology & Human Values
    Conditions and processes of industrialization in the Western world; problems related to economic development in emerging nations; impact of industry on lifeways of modern humans. Prerequisite: Sociology and Anthropology 110. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    SOAN 271
  • ES 273: Cultural Ecology of Africa
    In this course, we will study the relationships between African peoples and their environments. We will consider the process of globalization and its relationship to the changing landscape of Africa in a historical context. By combining environmental studies and anthropology, we will bring a unique perspective to our study of the historical interaction of African cultures and environments, from pre-colonial times through the colonial period to the current post-colonial period. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement.)
    SOAN 273, IREL 273
  • ES 282: Lake Forestry
    The subjects of Lake Forestry are the trees, forests, and prairies of the Midwest. This course will introduce students to the ecology of individual trees and other plants and to the ecological assemblages of which they are a part. Also included in this course are forest and prairie history and the history of forestry, the relationship between forest and prairie ecosystems and urban and agricultural ecosystems, and current conservation and restoration efforts. All classes will be held outside. In 2016, there will be four mandatory weekend field trips: August 27 and September 10 throughout the greater Chicago area, September 23?25 to Northern Wisconsin, and October 14?17 (Fall Mid-Semester Break) to Southern Illinois. (Meets GEC Natural and Mathematical Sciences Requirement.)
  • ES 287: Sustainable Food Systems
    Modern food systems have been shaped by complex political, economic, and ecological forces. This course will take a hands-on approach to examining the origins of these forces; understanding their effects on the environment, human health, and the economy; and considering alternatives to the prevailing system. Focusing on a practical as well as theoretical approach to food systems reform, students will participate in extensive hands-on learning in the campus garden, visit alternatives to conventional food production and distribution, and contribute to in-class debates and workshops. (Not open to students who have completed ES 289.)
  • ES 288: Botanical Imperialism
    From corn and sugar cane to opium and nutmeg, from quinine and rubber to pineapples and potatoes, the desire for plant products and the subsequent movement of plants around the globe has been both a cause and a consequence of imperial expansion. This course will examine the impact that plants and their products have had on human political history. The desire for spices, medicines, and crops has driven, and continues to drive, the people and governments of more developed nations to subjugate the people and governments of other, less developed nations, usually with disastrous results. We will spend most class sessions outside the classroom: at the Chicago Botanic Garden, the Field Museum, and in Lake Forest's own vegetable garden. Students will be responsible for learning plant science - the morphology, evolutionary biology, and chemistry of the plants we study - in addition to the history and politics. No prerequisites. (Fulfills GEC Social Science Requirement.)
  • ES 289: Biodiversity and Agriculture
    Defining agriculture in the broad sense, to include fishing and animal husbandry, this course provides a foundation of knowledge of agricultural history and the present state of food production, distribution, and consumption. The course will include basic biology, concentrating on the diversity of plants and animals that have given rise to the crops in use today. We will also look at the changes in ecosystems caused by agriculture and the different types of new ecosystems that agriculture has given rise to. The relationship between agriculture and conservation will be an important theme in this class. The course will be interdisciplinary, with readings from biology, history, literature, law, economics, and politics. The experiential component to this course is critical, and students will visit the proposed campus agricultural initiative, local farms (City Farm, Angelic Organics), and the Chicago Botanic Gardens. To complement the local/place-based understanding, we will explore the origins of agriculture and farming in the developing world. (Not open to students who have completed ES 287.)
  • ES 315: Soc Ethics Energy Production & Use
    Course description: the course will explore the ethical implications of possible future energy initiatives. Emphasis will be given to the global implications of interdependency on primary resources and the technological initiatives of nuclear power and alternative sources. Students will focus on independent research projects, with both domestic and international components, surrounding the environmental, social, and ethical issues of future energy production and use. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor.
    SOAN 315, PHIL 315
  • ES 316: Sustainable Energy
    This course focuses on energy and the associated resources needed to sustain human life and prosperity. We examine existing and emerging energy technologies, addressing their environmental strengths and weaknesses, technical and economic viability and compatibility with evolving public and regulatory expectations. Among the technologies addressed are oil, gas, nuclear, hydroelectric, wind, geothermal, solar and ocean-based systems. The approach is quantitative and the course is suitable for those comfortable with science and mathematics, although calculus will not be required. (Meets GEC Natural and Mathematical Sciences Requirement.) Prerequisite: ES 220, BIOL 220, ES 271, or permission of instructor.
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  • ES 332: Environmental Writing
    This course focuses on writing about the environment. Students will explore different approaches to the environmental essay, including adventure narrative, personal reflection, and natural history. Poetry and fiction will also play a role as we explore the practice of place-centered writing. We will also use the immediate surroundings of the Chicago area as an environment for our writing. Prerequisite: English 235 or a lower-level Environmental Studies course.
    ENGL 332
  • ES 340: Environ & Natural Resource Econ
    (Environmental and Natural Resource Economics) Examines different economic theories regarding optimal use of renewable and nonrenewable resources, why market responses to pollution are typically unsatisfactory, and optimal pollution control. These theories are then applied to the real world, taking into consideration political and technological constraints. The impact of past and current policy on the environment will be studied, as will the potential impact of proposed legislation. Prerequisite: ECON 210 or permission of the instructor.
    ECON 340
  • ES 344: Chicago: The Food City
    Food forms the basis for Chicago's cultural and economic success. From its efficient grid system to its waterway access, the city provided grain and livestock to the country by rail, barge, and truck for much of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In the twenty-first century, new issues challenge national and global food systems, and Chicago stands at the forefront of innovation regarding them. This course covers the history, geography, economics, and environmental impact of food production, distribution, and consumption. We will highlight the following: population distribution, water management, food technology, transportation and storage costs, civic governance, local and regional sustainability, job creation, food deserts, urban farming, ethnic food distribution, and community development. An emphasis will be placed on how differential access to or impact of each of these factors is influenced by ethnicity, income, and education of the citizens. Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 110 or permission of instructor. (This course fulfills the GEC Social Science Requirement.)
  • ES 350: Marine and Island Ecology
    This summer school course, offered by the Shedd Aquarium and the Associated Colleges of the Chicago Area, includes a field experience in the Bahama Islands. Students learn how oceanography and water chemistry affect marine habitats and island environments. Students develop identification techniques for fishes, reptiles, plants and invertebrates while gaining knowledge of field research. The capstone experience is a nine-day excursion on Shedd's research vessel, the R/V Coral Reef II, studying tropical marine and island flora and fauna and surveying marine and terrestrial communities of the Exuma Islands. (Meets GEC Natural and Mathematical Sciences Requirement.) Prerequisite: Biology 220. Credit: one Lake Forest College credit.
  • ES 358: Amer Environmnt in Great Depression
    (American Environment During the Great Depression). This course explores the many ways Americans understood and shaped their diverse local environments during the crisis of the Great Depression. Although the Dust Bowl is perhaps the most iconic of these environmental upheavals during the 1930s, this course examines diverse geographical regions: from the Appalachian mountains to the (de)forested Upper Midwest, from the agricultural South to the Dust Bowl plains and the water-starved West. In each region, we use interdisciplinary approaches (including literary, historical, sociological, and visual media studies methods) to trace the impacts of economic turmoil on the environment and the people who depended on it for their livelihoods, as well as the way economic disaster paved the way for the government's unprecedented intervention in environmental matters.This course fosters critical examination of American subcultures during the Great Depression, including African-Americans, the Southern poor, the Range culture of the American West, and the immigrant experience. Prerequisite: Any 200-level ES course or permission of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    AMER 358
  • ES 361: Environmental Law
    This course will explore basic issues of law and policy involved in the consumption, conservation, and regulation of natural resources. In particular, we will consider how various competing public and private interests in the use and protection of the environment affect legislative, administrative, and judicial decision making. Topics to be discussed include: agency management of environmental risk; civil suits as a means of environmental law enforcement; wilderness and the use of public land; takings and other private property rights concerns; federalism and the environment. Among other statutes, we will examine the National Environmental Policy Act, the Clean Air Act, the Wilderness Act, the Endangered Species Act, and the Toxic Substances Control Act. (Meets GEC Social Science requirement.)
  • ES 362: Political Ecology
    Political ecology examines the politics of the environment, exploring ways politics affects the environment and, conversely, the environment politics. This course expands our understanding of politics to examine the roles of human and non-human political actors in environmental change, environmental knowledge acquisition and dissemination, and environmental inequalities. With global inequality as a central concern, we consider topics such as global "villagization" in Tanzania, development projects in India, agrarian reforms in the global south, and effects of land loss on Cajuns, Native Americans, and African-Americans in Southern Louisiana. We also look carefully at the concept of agency and explore how much it is possible to expand our notions of agency to non-human environmental entities, such as animals, plants ecosystems, and genes. Possible topics include cows, cotton, the Mississippi River, and carbon. Prerequisite: Any 200-level course in ES, ENGL, PHIL, or POLS. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    IREL 397
  • ES 363: Apocalypse in PostWWII Amer Envrnmt
    (Apocalypse and Fear in the Post-WWII American Environment.) One dominant strain of the post-World War II American environmental imagination has been fear of imminent environmental apocalypse, which manifests itself on a spectrum from diffuse anxiety to paralyzing terror. This course explores this culture of fear through a variety of topics in postwar American environmental consciousness, including the specter of atomic annihilation, the anti-eco-toxics and environmental justice movements, food security, and climate change. Texts and methodological approaches are literary, historical, anthropological, and sociological. Prerequisite: Any 200-level ES or Hist course.
    AMER 367
  • ES 365: Poetry and Nature
    This course explores the long history of poetry and its relationship to the natural world, from its roots in Classical Asian and European poetry to its postmodern manifestations. Understanding the natural processes that served as inspiration and subject matter of nature poetry will enrich student understanding of the poem as work of literature and also the poetry-writing process. If enrolled in ES 365, students will respond to the poems with literary and natural history analysis; if enrolled in ENGL 365, students will respond with their own poetry and creative writing. Prerequisite: One 200-level English course or 200-level Environmental Studies course.
    ENGL 365
  • ES 367: Environmental Writing
    This course focuses on writing about the environment. Students will explore different approaches to the environmental essay, including adventure narrative, personal reflection, and natural history. Poetry and fiction will also play a role as we explore the practice of place-centered writing. We will also use the immediate surroundings of the Chicago area as an environment for our writing. Prerequisite: English 135/235 or a lower-level Environmental Studies course. Not open to students who have completed ENGL 332.
    ENGL 367
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  • ES 368: Endangered Species and Languages
    (Endangered Species and Endangered Languages). Both species and languages can become endangered and go extinct. This course examines the similarities and differences between species and languages in their formation, their evolution, their relationships to each other, and their extinction. We will ask what it means to save a species or a language. We will consider whether some species are of higher conservation value than others and whether the same is true of languages. Prerequisite: One 200-level Environmental Studies course, or one 200-level Biology course, or one 200-level Sociology/Anthropology course, or Linguistics 201.

  • ES 369: Species
    This course provides an in-depth examination of the concept of species as it is used in biology, especially in evolutionary biology, ecology, and conservation biology. Each student chooses a difficult native plant species complex, such as the oaks, the sunflowers, or the asters, to investigate in the field and in the laboratory. Using the literature on species concepts, students attempt to delineate species boundaries within their complex applying two or more of these concepts. Prerequisite: Any 200-level Environmental Studies, Biology, or Philosophy course. (Meets GEC Natural and Mathematical Sciences Requirement.)
  • ES 370: Ecology
    This course examines current concepts and research in ecology at the levels of populations, communities, landscapes, ecosystems, and global processes. Emphasis will be placed on field research methods and reading of the primary literature. Lectures, discussions, and other classroom activities will be combined with field and laboratory exercises. Three classroom and four laboratory/field hours per week. Prerequisites: Biol 220, and either Biol 221 or Junior status.
  • ES 376: Animal Conservation
    (Animal Conservation: Ecology, Behavior, and Genetics) This course examines the conservation of biodiversity - genes, species, ecosystems, and the interactions between them - through the lens of animals, and large animals in particular. Elephants, whales, rhinos, giraffes, gorillas, and bison are among the groups of animals studied. Feeding and mating ecology, mutualisms and parasitisms, and the particular behavioral and genetic problems of small population sizes are the key concepts applied to each of these groups. Political, agricultural, and socio-economic barriers to conservations are also examined. Prerequisite: ES 220.
  • ES 384: Plant Biology
    This course aims to provide a thorough knowledge and understanding of land and aquatic plants, photosynthetic protists and fungi, including: molecular biology; chemical organization and genetics; structures and functions of plant cells, tissues, and organs; principles of systematic botany, nomenclature, and classification; evolutionary relationships among the major groups; and the relationship between plants and their environments. An emphasis on hands-on experimentation will allow students to design experiments, analyze data, and present their results. Three 50-minute lectures and one 3-hour lab per week are required. Biol 220, and either Biol 221 or Junior status. Students must also register for a lab.
    BIOL 384
  • ES 387: Who Speaks for Animals?
    This course explores the aims, motives, and achievements of those who either intentionally or unintentionally speak for animals - scientists, natural historians, philosophers, animal trainers, legal scholars, veterinarians, conservationists, nature writers, and artists, among others. This course investigates the meaning of animals to humans, the meaning of humans to animals, and the meaning of animals to each other. These investigations raise questions about the nature of equality, reason, feeling, justice, language, the social contract, and sentimentality. Prerequisites: Politics 260, or any Environmental Studies or Philosophy course at the 200 level or above, or junior standing.
  • ES 393: Research Project

  • ES 481: Biological & Social Life of Paper
    This course explores the historical origins of paper; the biological organisms - cotton, linen, trees - we get paper from; the environmental effects of the production, use, and disposal of paper; and the cultural meaning of paper. We will follow paper from cradle to grave, cutting a tree and making paper ourselves, and learning to recycle paper. We will consider the pros and cons of a 'paperless future.' We will visit a plantation grown for paper-making, a paper-making factory, and the Newberry Library. We will also consider the history, production, circulation, and use of paper in the social production of knowledge, the shared imagination of value, and the mutual relations of consumers and commodities. There will be a semester-long 20-25 page research paper. Each student will be expected to lead one class session based on his or her research-paper topic.
  • ES 482: 2010 Blowout in Gulf of Mexico
    This course explores many aspects of the 2010 ecological disaster in the Gulf of Mexico, including the geology of the Gulf, the engineering techniques used to drill for oil and gas, uses of and possible substitutes for oil in the past, present and future, the environmental problems created by oil spills and the various cleanup and remediation techniques used, the effect of the leak on oil markets, and comparisons to other oil spills (notably those in Nigeria). Students will spend their fall break at sites along the Gulf, observing the effects of the leak and participating in cleanup efforts. Each student will choose a semester-long research project and be responsible for leading a class session based on their project as well as submitting a significant paper summarizing their research and conclusions.
  • ES 483: Env Connections Chicago-New Orleans
    (Senior Seminar: The Environmental Connections between Chicago and New Orleans) This course explores the environmental issues associated with the greater Chicago area and compares and connects them to the environmental issues associated with New Orleans and the lower Mississippi Delta. The connection between the two areas goes back to the mid-19th century decision to reroute the Chicago River and build a canal system that effectively connected the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico. This geographical change provided a trade route from Chicago to the Gulf, enabling Chicago to be a major distributing center for both major trade routes from the Midwest - the Mississippi and the Great Lakes. Other comparisons that the course will address are: energy issues of coal and oil, migration routes from the Delta to Chicago, and urbanization. Prerequisite: senior standing and a major in ES or permission of instructor. There will be a Spring Break trip down the Mississippi to New Orleans, as well as shorter field trips around the Chicago area.
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  • ES 484: Restoring Native Wildlife
    (Senior Seminar: Restoring Native Wildlife: Motivations, Methods, and Mixed Outcomes) Humans have frequently tried to restore populations of native wildlife species to areas from which they have been extirpated. This course covers a variety of different restoration efforts, looking at reasons that the species disappeared, arguments for and against restoration, methods used, and the successes and failures of the projects. We review key factors that are likely to determine the outcome of projects. The course also discusses the dual relationship between wildlife and habitat restoration projects. Case studies may include urban peregrine falcon release programs, the Eastern Whooping Crane Partnership, wolf projects in Yellowstone National Park and nearby areas, two 2015 bison restoration programs in Illinois, as well as other projects. Students are expected to participate in several field trips, at least one of which includes multiple days. Prerequisites: Senior standing and a major or minor in Environmental Studies, or permisssion of instructor.
  • ES 493: Research Project

 

  • ENTP 120: Introduction to Entrepreneurship
    This course introduces students to the world of entrepreneurship through the development of the entrepreneurial mindset. The focus will be on both starting a new business as well as on the advancement of entrepreneurial thinking within a large corporation. Students will analyze the entrepreneurial process of formulating, planning, and implementing new business ventures and opportunities from domestic and international viewpoints. Building upon these concepts, the financial aspects and issues confronting entrepreneurs will be analyzed in order to foster the development of sound financial plans and controls for the organization.
  • ENTP 225: Principles of Marketing
    Analysis of how marketing concepts impact an organization through the development of the marketing mix (product, price, place and promotion). Building upon these concepts, students will develop an understanding of how marketing managers develop specific strategies in order to gain competitive advantage in a global economy (formerly BUSN 345). No prerequisites.
    Cross-listed as: BUSN 225, IREL 213
  • ENTP 285: Creative Arts Entrepreneurship
    Creative Arts Entrepreneurship will offer an overview of the processes, practices, and decision-making activities that lead to the realization of our creative ideas. Students from across the humanities, arts, sciences, and business will learn the unique contexts and challenges of creative careers, with an emphasis on collaborative projects. The course will help students understand the nature and structure of arts enterprise while cultivating their own career vision and creative goals. Creative Arts Entrepreneurship is designed for students interested in developing, launching, or advancing innovative enterprises in arts, culture, and design, and those who love the initiative, ingenuity and excitement of putting creative ideas into action. The course combines readings and in-class discussions with site visits, case studies, guest lectures by working artists and creative professionals, and student-driven projects. No prerequisites.
    Cross-listed as: MUSC 285, ART 285, ENGL 285, THTR 285
  • ENTP 320: Principles of Sales and Negotiation
    The course will present various theories and practices in sales and negotiation techniques, using applications from modern businesses. It will also discuss various management strategies used to develop and motivate a sales force, including departmental structures and retention incentives. Prerequisite: BUSN 225.
    Cross-listed as: BUSN 320
  • ENTP 346: Entrepreneurial Marketing
    This project-based course focuses on marketing strategies that are relevant for new businesses or new product launches within a corporate setting. A broad overview of advertising development including account planning/research, the creative process, production, and media planning will be examined. Focus will be on print advertising, electronic media, digital interactive media, direct mail, and specialty advertising. Through the Entrepreneurial Marketing Analysis Project, students will have the opportunity to work with a local small business examining their current marketing and promotional strategies within the environment in which they are operating. Prerequisite: BUSN/ENTP 225 (formerly BUSN/ENTP 345).
    Cross-listed as: BUSN 346
  • ENTP 350: Innovation & Small Bus Development
    (Innovation, Franchising and Small Business Development) This course investigates the introduction of innovative product/service ideas with respect to new business start-ups, buyouts, and franchising. Small business development will be analyzed as competencies needed for initiating, growing, and managing small business ventures in varied for-profit, non-profit, and global settings. Course content explores the creative process as it applies to understanding the role of innovation as an inducement of economic security, compares franchise opportunities and options, and identifies the stages that small businesses move through while developing an understanding of effective entrepreneurial growth. Prerequisite: ENTP 120.
  • ENTP 360: Social Entrepreneurship
    Social entrepreneurship is a cross-cultural and interdisciplinary practice that combines traditional business and finance principles with expertise from fields as diverse as agriculture, medicine, law, engineering, environmental studies and sociology. The efforts of social entrepreneurs attempt to address problems such as poverty, hunger, disease, pollution, illiteracy, and inadequate housing in developing areas of Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The result of these efforts is often a new business model for improved economic development and enhanced quality of life in a particular cultural setting. Strategic partnerships contribute to the success of such social enterprises through connections with government, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), relief agencies, microfinance institutions, and human rights groups in varied cultural settings. This course prepares students for a changing business environment through cross-cultural and interdisciplinary assignments including field interviews, team projects, and student-created videos. Prerequisite: FIN 210. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: BUSN 360, IREL 316
  • ENTP 365: Strategic Small Business Consulting
    This course analyzes the role consultants can play in growing small businesses, with a particular focus on problem solving and developing strategies to achieve overall growth within an organization. Course objectives include: describing the consulting process and the role it serves within companies and society, how to assess the internal strengths and weaknesses as well as the external threats and opportunities of a small business, and how to appraise the organizational problems of a small business. The course provides hands-on, real-world experience of what entrepreneurs do after starting their business. Students will apply these concepts via experiential learning as they assume the role of a consultant with an actual local small business. Prerequisites: ENTP 120, ENTP/BUSN 225
  • ENTP 370: Entrepreneurial Finance
    Entrepreneurialism thrives in the U.S. and is essential to the country's economy with well over half a million new business ventures being launched each year. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, small businesses employ half of all private sector employees and have generated the majority of new jobs in recent years. It is likely that many of today's business college graduates will work at, finance, and possibly start-up new business enterprises. The objectives of the course include: (i) gaining an understanding of the new business venture process, (ii) examining the financial aspects of strategic and business planning, (iii) developing the tools for financial forecasting, and (iv) establishing a framework for business valuation - both from the entrepreneur's and investor's perspective. Prerequisites: FIN 210 or FIN 237, and BUSN 230.
    Cross-listed as: FIN 370
  • ENTP 380: Entrepreneurial Ventures
    This capstone course reviews how new businesses are started and develops an understanding of how to examine the viability of these new business ideas. Students will have the opportunity to work with a local entrepreneur through the City of Lake Forest incubator. Strategic thinking in an entrepreneurial context will be demonstrated as students put together an original business concept and complete a full business plan. Prerequisites: ENTP/BUSN 225 (formerly ENTP/BUSN 345) and ENTP 350.
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  • ETHC 118: Comparative Religious Ethics
    An introduction to the sources and patterns of moral reasoning within different religious traditions. The course will examine historical and contemporary ethical issues, along with different theoretical frameworks describing what constitutes ethical behavior. Students will develop their own responses to complex contemporary issues to understand conflicting perspectives and different ethical frameworks. Case studies focus on such contemporary issues as the ethics of war and peace, conflicting environmental policies, fair and just dispute resolutions, and balancing the good of society against the value of individual freedoms. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    RELG 118
  • ETHC 250: Dialogue: Race, Ethnicity, Religion
    In a culturally and socially diverse society, exploring issues of difference, conflict, and community is needed to facilitate understanding and improve relations between social/cultural groups. In this course, students will engage in meaningful discussion of controversial, challenging, and divisive issues in society related to race, ethnicity, and religion. Students will be challenged to increase personal awareness of their own cultural experience, expand knowledge of the historic and social realities of other cultural groups, and take action as agents of positive social change in their communities. This course requires a high level of participation from all students. Not open to students who have completed ETHC 260. Note: This course earns .5 credits. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    AFAM 250, RELG 221
  • ETHC 252: Dialogue: Gender Identity
    In a culturally and socially diverse society, exploring issues of difference, conflict, and community is needed to facilitate understanding and improve relations between social/cultural groups. In this course, students will engage in meaningful discussion of controversial, challenging, and divisive issues in society related to gender identity. Students will be challenged to increase personal awareness of their own cultural experience, expand knowledge of the historic and social realities of other cultural groups, and take action as agents of positive social change in their communities. This course requires a high level of participation from all students. Not open to students who have completed ETHC 260. Note: This course earns .5 credits. No Prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    GSWS 252
  • ETHC 260: Dialogue: Race, Ethnicity, & Gender
    (Dialogue: Race, Ethnicity, and Gender.) In a culturally and socially diverse society, exploring issues of difference, conflict, and community is needed to facilitate understanding and improve relations between social/cultural groups. In this course, students will engage in meaningful discussion of controversial, challenging, and divisive issues in society related to race, ethnicity, and gender identity. Students will be challenged to increase personal awareness of their own cultural experience, expand knowledge of the historic and social realities of other cultural groups, and explore how to take action as agents of positive social change in their communities. This course requires a high level of participation from all students. Not open to students who have completed either ETHC 250 or ETHC 252. Note: This course is offered during the summer term only. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • ETHC 261: Art of Social Change
    Artists have a long history as agents of social change, using "traditional" art forms such as painting, drawing, printmaking and sculpture, and a bit more recently photography, performance and video to critique various aspects of society and to propose alternatives for the future. The consideration of social engagement as an artistic medium in and of itself has become an important current in contemporary art since at least the 1990s. This course will begin with a consideration of some of the ways artists in the past approached social and political concerns. We will then focus on the more recent proliferation of artists with social practices both within and outside of the gallery/museum realm of contemporary art. Students will address various important historical, theoretical and practical texts; conduct discussions and presentations; and collaborate to design and enact original works of socially engaged art. No prerequisites.
    ART 261
  • ETHC 276: Social Justice and Human Rights
    Examination of the concepts and debates surrounding social justice and human rights, with attention to the arguments between East and West. Applications to current global and domestic issues, such as globalization; poverty and disparities in wealth and opportunity; race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation; political liberties; and genocide.
    PHIL 276, IREL 286
  • ETHC 277: Social Justice versus Freedom?
    Examination of the perceived tensions between efforts to promote social justice and guarantees of individual freedom. Theoretical debates will be linked to practical issues, such as promotion of free markets versus government social programs and questions of government's legitimate role on personal issues, such as providing for gay marriage. Efforts to seek common ground will be explored. No prerequisites.
    PHIL 277, IREL 287
  • ETHC 290: What Makes a Great Leader?
    How do we recognize a good leader? Is a just or effective leader the same as a great leader? Materials will be drawn from literature, film, and biographies, as well as more theoretical readings from the humanities and social sciences, as we try to answer these very important questions. We will consider specific examples of good and bad leadership (fictional or historical) from a variety of realms, such as politics, social movements, religion, the arts, education, law, science, and public intellectualism. Open to sophomore or junior Honors Fellows, and others with permission of the Honors Fellows Committee.
    HSEM 290
  • ETHC 320: Topics in Ethics
    Collaborative research project culminating in a specific ethical theme (announced each time the course is offered.) The course runs for an academic year, earning .5 credit per semester. The course may be repeated for credit. Participation by invitation.
  • ETHC 330: Comparative and International Educ

    ETHC 330: Comparative and International Education: Education as the Practice of Freedom

    This course examines both the study and practice of comparative and international education. The course is organized with a multidisciplinary perspective with analysis of history, theory, methods, and issues in comparative and international education. A major goal of the course is to interrogate the linkages between education and society. Recurrent themes will be examined to demonstrate how every educational system not only arises from but also shapes its particular socio-cultural context. Students will have the opportunity to deepen and expand their knowledge of educational issues within a global context. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    EDUC 320, SOAN 344, IREL 388
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  • ETHC 340: Equity & Social Justice in Educ

    ETHC 340: Equity and Social Justice in Education

    This course intends to examine notions of 'equity' and 'social justice' in the context of three aspects of education: the historical founding of U.S. schools on oppressive ideals; the ways in which race, gender, and sexual orientation affect and disrupt one's experiences of schooling; and the evolution of the efforts to work against these phenomena within the field of education. The course will explore equity and social justice from a variety of perspectives and through different texts, including analytical journal articles and personal narratives. Readings and discussions will be based heavily on the local world of public education as a microcosm of these issues as they have played out nationally and internationally. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    EDUC 310, AFAM 310
  • ETHC 352: Topics in Social Justice
    Examination of a particular issue in social justice, through a research project. Common elements of the course will include examinations of theoretical issues and debates, allowing students to select from a range of possible research topics. Significant time will be devoted to periodic student reports on their projects. Prerequisite: Ethics Center/Philosophy 276 or 277 or permission of instructor.
    PHIL 352

 

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  • FIN 130: Applied Statistics
    Distribution analysis, sampling theory, statistical inference, and regression analysis, with emphasis on the application of statistical techniques using spreadsheet software to analyze economic and business issues. Students who have taken this course will not receive credit for MATH 150. Prerequisite or corequisite: ECON 129.
    ECON 130, BUSN 130
  • FIN 140: Introduction to Insurance
    The insurance industry, operating from the fundamental principle of managing risk, interacts with a wide variety of disciplines and practices, from actuarial work to sales to modern advertising and sports marketing. Accordingly, this course provides a broad overview of the field, covering topics such as the definition of insurance, marketing, premiums, underwriting, instrument design and actuarial science, investing, claims processing, and the difference between personal and commercial insurance. Further, the course focuses on how the insurance industry drives global innovation, how it integrates with financial planning, how it uses technology to keep up with the pace of innovation, and how its driving principle, protection against future risk, plays a major role in daily life. No prerequisites.
  • FIN 210: Financial Management
    This course provides an overview of the questions and problems faced by financial managers, as well as an introduction to the basic set of tools they use to help them make optimal investment and financing decisions under conditions of risk and uncertainty. The main topics include time value of money, the valuation of bond and stocks, the trade-off between risk and return, the efficient markets hypothesis, the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM), cost of capital, and a brief introduction to derivative securities and international finance issues. Prerequisites: ECON 110 and ECON/BUSN/FIN 130 with grades of C- or better.
  • FIN 310: Corporate Finance
    This course studies the theory, methods, and issues of corporate finance. The emphasis throughout is on the economic principles that underlie business financial decisions and their impact on wealth maximization. The content includes capital budgeting, optimal capital structure, payout policies, financial planning, working capital, and corporate restructuring issues related to ownership and control. Prerequisites: FIN 210 and BUSN 230, both with a grade of C- or better.
  • FIN 320: Investments
    This course provides an examination of financial securities and financial markets from the perspective of individual investors. The main topics include securities markets, security analysis, portfolio theory, mutual funds, derivative securities, market efficiency, behavioral finance, and industry regulations. Prerequisites: BUSN 230 and FIN 210 with grades of C- or better. Not open to students who have completed FIN 380.
  • FIN 337: Real Estate Finance
    An examination of the fundamental concepts, principles, and analytical methods involved in debt financing of residential and commercial real estate. Through lectures, readings, problem sets, casework, presentations and exams, students will develop and demonstrate their understanding of the process of underwriting and financing residential and commercial properties. Mortgage financing for the purpose of homeownership will lead to a focus on income-producing properties for the purpose of investment. Both the perspectives of the borrower as well as of the lender will be considered. Present value calculations and capitalization rates will be emphasized. The role of real estate capital markets will be introduced. Prerequisite: FIN 210 or FIN 237.
  • FIN 340: Risk Management and Insurance
    Risk management is the identification, assessment, and prioritization of risks followed by a coordinated response to minimize, monitor, and control the probability and/or impact of adverse events. Strategies used to manage risks typically include transferring the risk to another party and reducing the probability of the risk. This course provides students with an in-depth analysis of insurance and risk management, focusing primarily on business risks but personal risk management issues are also covered. In addition to discussing risk management in general, topics include an overview of the private insurance market, how insurance is used in risk management, alternative methods for transfer risk, insurance asset management, and insurance company regulations and ratings. Prerequisite: FIN 140.
  • FIN 365: Fundamental Equity Analysis
    Fundamental equity analysis is a stock investment technique based on the economic concept that markets are not implicitly efficient, but instead trend towards efficiency in part using fundamental analysis as a tool to outperform markets by arbitraging inefficiencies in the market. The goal of fundamental equity analysis is to seek out discrepancies in consensus views on equity securities that impact valuation using a combination of financial statement analysis and forecasting, industry/sector analysis and forecasting in tandem with disciplined approaches to valuation based on various objective quantitative criteria. Upon completing this course, students will have a rudimentary working understanding of the methodology fundamental analysts use to pick sectors and stocks. The course is heavily writing-intensive, with weekly case studies. Prerequisites: FIN 210, BUSN 230, and FIN 320.
  • FIN 370: Entrepreneurial Finance
    Entrepreneurialism thrives in the U.S. and is essential to the country's economy with well over half a million new business ventures being launched each year. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, small businesses employ half of all private sector employees and have generated the majority of new jobs in recent years. It is likely that many of today's business college graduates will work at, finance, and possibly start-up new business enterprises. The objectives of the course include: (i) gaining an understanding of the new business venture process, (ii) examining the financial aspects of strategic and business planning, (iii) developing the tools for financial forecasting, and (iv) establishing a framework for business valuation - both from the entrepreneur's and investor's perspective. Prerequisites: FIN 210 or FIN 237, and BUSN 230.
    ENTP 370
  • FIN 385: Options and Futures
    This course introduces the economic functions of options and futures markets, discusses the basic underlying pricing mechanism of options and futures contracts, and provides a working knowledge of these contracts as risk management tools. Prerequisites: FIN 210 and FIN 320
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  • FIN 415: Corp Fin, Public Policy, & Society
    (Corporate Finance, Public Policy, and Society) Theoretical and empirical issues in corporate finance are examined from the perspectives of the firm, the shareholders, and public policymakers. Topics covered include leveraged buyouts and mergers, corporate governance and managerial compensation, models of optimal capital structure and the impact of the tax system on corporate activity. Prerequisites: MATH 110, FIN 210, and FIN 310.
  • FIN 431: International Finance
    Identifies and analyzes fundamentals of international financial theory. Topics include exchange rate determination, balance of payments accounting, and international monetary systems and their evolution. Prerequisites: Economics 210 and 220; and junior or senior standing.
    ECON 431
  • FIN 465: Applied Investment Management
    This is an advanced course that will allow students to participate in live portfolio management while developing and implementing industry-standard investment research techniques. The class will focus on building and managing a $100 million, multi-asset class investment portfolio in a realistic asset management firm environment. The students, referred to as analysts, will engage in fundamental securities analysis and valuation in both individual and team settings. Students will present the results of their research, make investment recommendations, and evaluate the recommendations of others. The class will also involve trips to asset management firms in Chicago where students can interact with investment professionals. Prerequisites: FIN 310, FIN 320.
  • FIN 483: Behavioral Economics and Finance
    This course surveys research incorporating evidence from psychology into economic and financial decision-making theory. The aim of the course is to understand economic and financial models that more realistically explain and predict observed outcomes. The course explores prospect theory, biases in probabilistic judgment, projections biases, default effects, self-control problems, mental accounting, fairness and altruism. Students will use these tools to understand public goods contributions, financial market anomalies, consumption and savings behavior and myriad market outcomes. Prerequisites: ECON/BUSN/FIN 130 (or ECON/BUSN 180) and ECON 210.
    ECON 483
  • FIN 485: Quantitative Finance
    The main focus of this course is on the empirical and quantitative tools necessary for investment decisions. Topics will include time series econometrics, return predictability, asset pricing models with emphasis on factor models, market efficiency and active investment, hedge funds, trading and exchange microstructure, role of quantitative finance in the financial recession, and an introduction to behavioral finance. The main emphasis is on common stocks, but other asset classes may be covered. The class will involve the use of spreadsheets software such as Excel and/or limited application of programming language such as Python. Prerequisites: ECON 129, FIN 210 and FIN 320.
  • FIN 490: Internship
    Provides an opportunity to supplement academic training with work experience in the field of business and economics. Interested students must work with Career Services to develop a resume and register with the instructor by the following deadlines: by April 1 for a Fall internship; by November 1 for a Spring internship; and by the week following spring break for a Summer internship. Business and Economics internships may be done for either one or two credits. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, Economics 110 with a grade of C- or better as well as other designated courses relevant to the internship and earning a C or better in combination of these courses and Economics 110. Internships need to be for different experiences therefore continuation of previous internships, part-time or summer jobs is not allowed. The department will not give credit for internships that do not build directly on prior course work. Students on academic probation are ineligible for this program. Contact the Internship Supervisor for Economics and Business regarding additional information and guidelines.
    ECON 490, BUSN 490

 

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  • FIYS 106: Medical Mysteries of the Mind
    This course is for beginning students interested in exploring the human brain in a rigorous interdisciplinary way. If you are intensely interested in how your brain helps you think, feel, sense, read, write, eat, sleep, dream, learn and move, this course is for you. You will learn how brain dysfunction causes complex medical illnesses, like Alzheimer's, Autism, and Schizophrenia. You will meet Chicago's world-class neuroscientists through guest seminars and class-trips to famous laboratories. You will debate ethical dilemmas that face society and dissect human brains. Lastly, you will organize a Brain Awareness Week on campus and do outreach at elementary schools to teach what you learn to young children. While the course is intended for any serious student interested in mind mysteries, it will be of particular value for those planning natural science majors, biomedical/health professions, or a combination of biology and psychology. One year each of high school biology and chemistry is required.
  • FIYS 110: Country Music
    (Country Music: History, Style, Culture) In this course, students will investigate the history and styles of Country music, and how Country music has impacted American culture. This investigation will include the question of authenticity, the influence of the commercial market, and issues of race and gender. Students will engage in active listening, and will have the opportunity to attend musical performances.
  • FIYS 114: Nobel Humanity
    What do the books Voices from Chernobyl: The Oral History of a Nuclear Disaster (1997); Thinking, Fast and Slow (2011); Strength to Love (1963); and Chance and Necessity (1994) all have in common? First, they're all written by Nobel Prize winners; second, they all tell different parts of the wide-sweeping story of the human desire for political, intellectual, scientific, and social freedom during the twentieth century up to today. In this course we will trace how freedom and humanity have been changed, challenged, and charged by Nobel Prize winners in literature, economics and social science, physiology (medicine), and physics. Our laureates will reveal to us how genetic structures, economic and political oppression, tragedy, and the pursuit of freedom reveal some of the most important, current views on our common humanity.
  • FIYS 115: Climate Change Across Disciplines
    This course will explore the most pressing issue of our time: climate change. We will examine the physical science of global warming, but more so we will focus on the social, political, ethical, psychological and artistic aspects of global warming. We will critically examine the predicted and current consequences of climate change and how it impacts groups of people differently. In addition, we will engage the following questions: What global and local political efforts have been made to address and deny the problem? What are the economic implications of climate change? What do ethics and the law say about global warming? How has modern literature and film imagined the future in a warming world? Is technology enough to get us out of this mess or will it require more systemic social change? As individuals and societies how do we cognitively perceive such a large problem?
  • FIYS 130: The Science of Cooking
    Since 1992, the term molecular gastronomy has become part of understanding the world's cuisine. This course will examine the chemistry and physics of cooking, and the physiology of taste and flavor. We will explore such questions as what is the science behind making a foam or gel; how do you prevent food bacteria from forming; and what does it mean to temper chocolate? The science of cooking includes the important works of Hervé This, Heston Blumenthal, Ferran Adria, José Andrés, and Grant Achatz, among others. We will read their work and not only become familiar with the latest materials and methods of the world's most innovative cuisine, but also learn how these methods may be part of the solution to ending world hunger. We will work with a chef to perform experiments to elucidate the theory we will be studying.
  • FIYS 133: The Great War
    World War I (1914-1918) is a historical milestone. It marked the end of the "old world order" and unleashed complex forces of political, economic and social change, the effects of which are still being felt today. What caused World War I? How did political, diplomatic and military issues affect the conduct of the war in Europe? What is the legacy of the "Great War"? The course examines the complex forces and events that compelled the European powers to take up arms against one another. It also explores opposition to the war among pacifists, conscientious objectors, suffragettes and socialists.
  • FIYS 134: Women in Medieval Christianity
    Christianity in medieval Europe (ca. 500-1500 CE) was characterized by an ambivalent attitude toward women. Eve was blamed for original sin, while the Virgin Mary was revered for her role in humanity's salvation. This ambivalence in theology extended to other realms, including religion, politics, and medicine. This course will explore the lives of women in this period, with an emphasis on their participation in spiritual movements. We will meet women who were nuns, martyrs, queens, scholars, mystics, and soldiers - as well as more ordinary women. We will discuss the particular challenges posed by primary sources by or about women. We will also critically analyze some of the major themes in recent scholarship on gender history.
  • FIYS 138: Understanding Islam
    The September 11 attacks brought Islam to the forefront of policy discussions, media, and popular culture. A religion that most Americans knew little about was now the focus of discussions across America, and Americans were raising important questions: What role did Islam play in motivating the attackers? Why do they hate us? What is jihad? Does Islam advocate violence? How are non-Muslims regarded in Islam? This course introduces students to the theological and political teachings of Islam and examines contemporary discourse about Islam. Beginning with the emergence of Islam, students will study its shared Abrahamic roots with Judaism and Christianity. The course will also examine the basic principles or pillars of Islam, focusing on the practices of Muslims across the world. After studying the historical theology, the course examines doctrinal ideas that have become politicized such as Shari'a law, the caliphate, and jihad.
  • FIYS 142: Dostoevsky and the Russian Novel
    Is a student who murders a wealthy old pawnbroker justified in his murder, if he uses her money for the common good? Can a novelist realistically represent a purely good person, or would readers regard such a person as nothing more than an "idiot"? If the Devil visited one's bedroom, what would he look like and what conversation might he make? These are just a few of the fascinating questions prompted by Fyodor Dostoevsky's novels. This course will explore the evolution of Dostoevsky's literary and intellectual work leading up to his final novel of ideas, The Brothers Karamazov. We will focus on the genesis and development of that novel through Dostoevsky's contact with other novelists, such as Turgenev and Dickens. We will explore the novel against Dostoevsky's dramatic biographical and historical context. And we will examine the provocative philosophical, theological, political and aesthetic debates his novel broaches--debates that are as relevant today as they were in Dostoevsky's day.
  • FIYS 148: Fashion, Culture, and Communication
    Fashion is more than simply how we dress. Among other things, it is a means of personal expression, a reflection of an historical moment, and an international industry. In this course we will explore what fashion means at various points in history by considering how the political and social climate of the time period produces expectations for what should/should not be worn, by whom, and for what purpose. The course will therefore situate fashion in terms of both its production and consumption, exploring its role in relation to identity and body politics (race, gender, sexuality, class), art and status, nationhood and the global economy, and celebrity and popular culture.
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  • FIYS 149: Chicago Global-Local Microfinance
    This course considers the financial activities of the three billion 'unbanked' people around the world, those who lack access to formal banking services. By providing loans as low as $35, entrepreneurs are able to improve the household income as well as give unbanked people opportunities for better schools, improved health care, and healthier diets. From a Chicago perspective, microloans for local entrepreneurs result in business start-ups, expanded employment, and improved community development. Microfinance means more than loans; it comprises a portfolio of financial services that includes savings, insurance, transfers of funds, micro-franchising, and training for business operations and financial literacy. Through field visits, interviews, speakers, and videos, students will research ethnic areas of Chicago to propose creative financing for practical solutions to social problems. The course will prepare students for a changing business environment through cross-cultural and interdisciplinary assignments, team projects, and student-created video presentations.
  • FIYS 159: Chicago Stage and Screen
    Not only is the Chicago theater scene internationally acknowledged to be the greatest in the U.S., but the City has a significant history as host to many iconic movie and television production teams as well. In this course, you will have the opportunity to examine its rich and storied history in practice. Students will watch, read, discuss, and write about many of the plays or productions that you will see performed. Visiting a variety of Chicago theaters and soundstages, you will not only see the shows, but you will also meet many of the artists involved in the productions to talk about their work. This course requires participation in some evening and/or weekend field trips or events, so consider your other commitments (such as off-campus employment or a fall/winter sports participation) as you identify courses of interest to you.
  • FIYS 174: Chicago's Museums
    Chicago's renowned museums and exhibition spaces make it a destination for culture lovers the world over. From the Field and DuSable Museums to Hull House and the Art Institute, Chicago is home to a vast array of cultural, historical, and scientific repositories whose holdings include some of the greatest artifacts of human endeavor, contributing immensely to the city?s identity. This course introduces students to some of these museums, with an emphasis on art institutions, while also examining their historic and current roles in the life of the city. Topics include the management, collections, curation, audience, programming, and architecture of these institutions. One museum will be selected for in-depth investigation. Working individually and in small groups, students will research its various functions and present their findings to the class. Because of conflicts with field trips, fall and winter athletes should not register for this course.
  • FIYS 178: Saints and Sinners: Chicago
    Using film, literature, and field research at religious sites, this course looks at religious life in twenty-first century America. Students explore the contemporary practice of religion, from prayer and traditional rituals to yoga and meditation, while studying three religious traditions with established communities in the Chicago area. In addition to field trips, participants view award-winning popular films that address questions of religious identity, bigotry, and conflicting interpretations of spirituality. To gain a fuller appreciation of contemporary practice, the course includes visits to a mosque, a Christian church, and a Hindu temple.
  • FIYS 182: Civilization and Barbarism
    This course examines the issue of violence and its relation to cultural rules and principles. We look at violence from two angles: its destructive and generating power and the rich cultural meanings it reveals. We look at civilization as a system of rules that govern human conduct united under a highly selective set of guiding principles. The central theme of this course is to study how the pressure of violence will give rise to different rules of human conduct subsumed under a few major principles. We will study those rules and principles through the actions in order to gain a basic understanding of the fundamental ways culture and civilization shape human behavior.
  • FIYS 187: Religion in Gilded Age Chicago
    Students in this course will study the history and context of religion in Chicago at the turn of the century, roughly 1870-1930. We will examine pivotal events in the shaping of Chicago's religious communities, including religious immigration and the building of the city's major churches and synagogues, the World's Parliament of Religions in 1894, the rise of faith healer and self proclaimed prophet John Dowie, the arrival of the Baha'i movement, and new occult and metaphysical movements. In addition to written histories, this course makes use of field trips and historical archival material. This course requires participation in some evening and/or weekend field trips or events, so consider your other commitments (such as off-campus employment or a fall/winter sports participation) as you identify courses of interest to you.
  • FIYS 190: Exploring Adolescence: Then and Now
    (Exploring Adolescence: The Role of Chicago School Experiences Then and Now). Adolescence is a time of transitions shaped by the context of the experience. We will examine how adolescents develop with a focus on the challenges of the high school experience. Specifically, we will focus on the context of the Chicago public school experience and its impact on adolescent development as it existed both at the turn of the last century and today. To explore the contemporary situation, students traveling as a group will visit and conduct a series of observations at a Chicago high school. The class will develop a research question that can be compared to the past; this will be investigated and the data collected will be analyzed to form a case study. Students will work collaboratively as a research team to explore these questions, and they will use background knowledge and critical thinking skills to discuss the conclusions and implications of the research question.
  • FIYS 192: Stars: Black Holes, Dark Cosmos
    Are you curious about what is known and what is yet undefined in the realm of black holes, dark matter, dark energy, and other stuff of the Universe? What leads to the patterns of stars in the sky? What about the scientific evidence drives SETI astronomers and the NASA teams for Kepler space telescope exoplanet search and the Mars Curiosity rover mission to seek evidence of extraterrestrial life? Why are today's scientists more excited about how fast the universe expands than they are about the 1920's revelation that the universe is expanding? Gain insights into these and other current questions about astronomy and cosmology as we address topics from a perspective that you, scientist or scientifically curious, will find enriching and enlightening. This course requires participation in some evening and/or weekend field trips or events, so consider your other commitments (such as off-campus employment or a fall/winter sports participation) as you identify courses of interest to you.
  • FIYS 196: American Playwrights in Chicago
    Chicago is home to a vivid and diverse theater scene that includes everything from tiny stages in the back rooms of bars to glitzy Broadway-style productions. This course will examine a selection of American-authored plays from the Chicago season as the materials for an introduction to literary studies. As such, the course considers the plays we see and read as an occasion to develop skills in critical thinking, research, and writing. A secondary objective is to connect the various plays to particular moments or themes in American history and culture. We will proceed from the acquisition of a simple critical vocabulary for describing a play?s form and content, through character study, to more complex questions of the director's decisions in taking a play from the page to the stage. This course requires participation in some evening and/or weekend field trips or events, so consider your other commitments (such as off-campus employment or a fall/winter sports participation) as you identify courses of interest to you.
  • FIYS 197: Modern German Film
    Film provides a lens for studying culture, which this course will focus on Germany. Examining masterpieces of German cinema from its inception to the opening of the 21st century, the course will approach the filmmaker's art from the perspectives of political and cultural history as well as cinematic aesthetics: the "language of film." The course views films (subtitled in English) by such noted filmmakers as Lang, Fassbinder, Herzog, and Wenders. Along the way we will debate the powers and perils of popular culture, and trace patterns of interaction between history, works of art, and entertainment. Readings and discussions are in English, and the course encourages comparisons with films from other cultures, including popular Hollywood cinema. This course requires participation in some evening and/or weekend field trips or events, so consider your other commitments (such as off-campus employment or a fall/winter sports participation) as you identify courses of interest to you.
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  • FIYS 198: Chicago Trials: Criminal Division
    This course will examine criminal justice in Chicago from a social and historical perspective by dissecting high profile trials of jazz age murderers, a floppy-haired governor, disgraced members of the judiciary, bar, and police force, and a Grammy Award winning hip-hop artist. Students will study the unique political and judicial history of the city at the time of each case by exploring historical nonfiction, newspaper articles, court documents and transcripts, and by touring historical and contemporary Chicago sites relevant to each case. Using the context of these cases, students will gain an understanding of the judicial process as it functions in state and federal court and an ability to distinguish between the reality of justice in a court of law and the often times fictionalized perception of such reality. This course will include campus visits from judges, attorneys, and other members of the Chicago legal community with personal and specialized knowledge of the particular trials covered.

 

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  • FREN 110: Beginning French I
    French 110 is designed to develop the student's ability to aurally comprehend, speak, read, and write basic controlled patterns of the French language. No prerequisite.
  • FREN 111: Accelerated Beginning French
    French 111 is an intensive course designed to develop the ability to speak, read, write and navigate communication situations in the target language. Basic vocabulary and grammar are integrated into cultural readings, class discussions, and short compositions to apply the spoken and written language and increase understanding of elements of French-speaking cultures. This intensive course is designed for highly motivated students and replaces FREN 110 and 112. No prerequisite.
  • FREN 112: Beginning French II
    French 112 is a continuation of 110 and culminates in readings, class discussions, and free composition to provide facility with the spoken and written language and insight into its structure. Prerequisite for French 112: placement recommendation or a grade of C or better in French 110.
  • FREN 210: Interm French: Cultural Emphasis
    A course designed to afford the student a systematic review of all the basic elements of French grammar, implemented with culture-based readings and exercises, with a view to preparing the student for more sophisticated courses in language, literature, and culture. Classroom work supplemented by laboratory exercises. Prerequisite: French 111, 112 or placement exam recommendation.
  • FREN 212: Advanced Intermediate French
    A course designed to initiate the student to critical reading and thematic discussion of selected works of French fiction and expository prose. This course includes a strong emphasis on writing; a review of grammar topics, vocabulary building, and the organization and presentation of ideas in written form in French will be emphasized through a variety of writing assignments related to the literature studied. Prerequisite: French 210 or placement recommendation.
  • FREN 230: Exploring French Lit thru Film
    (Exploring French Literature through Film) This course, taught in English (with an option for French majors to complete reading and writing in French), will examine French literary works, both historical and contemporary, through a variety of cinematic examples taken from French films. This course will compare the expression of theme, character, and plot structure in written literature (plays and narratives) and in corresponding cinematic adaptations. The course will also address whether the author's literary style is reflected in or displaced by the cinematic style of French 'auteurs' (film directors) studied. The question of translation across genres (literature to film), across language and culture (example of American remakes), and across history (a historical period depicted in a modern cinematic era) will also be discussed. No prerequisite. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement. )
    CINE 230
  • FREN 231: French Culture through Film
    (Exploring French Culture through Film) This course, taught in English, examines contemporary French cultural perceptions through a variety of cinematic examples taken from French films. Cultural analysis will include discussions of French history, literature, politics, geography, and music. In addition, the topic of 'remaking culture' through film is addressed, as the current wave of cinematic remakes invites cross-cultural comparisons between the United States and France. The course will examine major French directors and their cinematic portrayals of the French, as well as documentaries and filmed interviews, and will analyze the 'authenticity' of the portrait they produce of French society. Prerequisite: FREN 212 or equivalent. Not open to students who have completed FREN 338: Cinema Francais. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    CINE 231
  • FREN 250: Grammar, Syntax, and Style
    Preparation for graded writing exercises and free composition through study of sentence structure. Complete review of grammar. Translation and study of excerpts of different writing styles from accomplished French encourages development of appropriateness in choice of words and sense of style. Prerequisite: French 212. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • FREN 255: Conversation and Composition
    Oral and written work for students who have already reached an intermediate level of competency in oral and written expression. This course will deal with familiar and formal French. Vocabulary and idioms are taught in a conversational context. Students familiarize themselves with the expressive gestures used by the French and the colloquial expressions that accompany them. Prerequisite: French 212 or permission of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • FREN 265: Albert Camus: Philos of the Absurd
    (Albert Camus: Philosophy of the Absurd) A study of Camus's philosophy of the absurd as presented in his writings from the individualistic revolt of The Stranger to the collective revolt expressed in The Plague. Camus's view of the conscience of modern humanity in The Fall also will be addressed. The evolution of Camus's style will be studied in the six short stories presented in Exile and the Kingdom. No prerequisite. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
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  • FREN 270: Translation & Creative Writing
    This course aims to develop the student's written fluency in French, through the synergy of using two complementary approaches to writing, ie. exercises in translation (primarily French-English) and creative writing exercises in French. The course literature, written by various francophone authors, will include narratives, poems, letters, dramatic scenes, and news articles. Translation of these varied literary genres will hone the student's use of grammar and syntax, as well as understanding of stylistic and literary devices in cultural context. Creative exercises will be linked to literary and stylistic elements of texts studied, and framed in one or more cultural contexts. Original writing will also be inspired by the use of visual media (e.g. film, images), for a variety of short writing assignments to include poetry, prose and dramatic dialogue. The students' oral expression in French will be enhanced by analytic discussion of the readings and visuals, short interpretation exercises (the oral equivalent of translation), presentation and discussion of original creative material. An original text will be chosen for submission to Collage literary magazine. Prerequisite: FREN 212 or equivalent. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • FREN 310: Phonetics
    This course will cover such topics as phonetics, morphology, syntax, lexicology, and semantics. It introduces these systems in their application to the French language. Prerequisite: French 212 or equivalent. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • FREN 315: Technical & Literary Translation
    An introduction to the theories and practice of translation from French to English and English to French. Students familiarize themselves with vocabulary used in newspaper and magazine articles on current topics of interest (politics, the economy, etc.), in advertising, in cartoons, and in selected poetry and prose. The arts of interpreting and dubbing or subtitling will also be explored. Prerequisite: French 212 or equivalent. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • FREN 320: French for Int'l Affairs & Business
    This course offers a basic grasp of business and commercial French vocabulary and concepts, while providing an understanding of cultural differences and similarities in the business arena. In addition to practical exercises in business creation, job interviewing and advertising in French, students gain a basic grasp of political and economic issues in contemporary France, giving students the background to discuss French news and current events intelligently. Particularly recommended for students thinking of careers in business, economics, politics or international relations. Prerequisite: FREN212 (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement.)
  • FREN 325: Intro Reading Literature in French
    This course is designed to prepare students for serious reading and analysis of literary texts in French. It is an introduction to the concepts of literary criticism and explication de texte and will familiarize the student with the vocabulary of literary analysis. The texts are chosen from the three major literary genres: poetry, prose, and drama. All lectures, discussions, and assignments are in French. Prerequisite: French 212. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • FREN 326: Chanson et société
    This course will examine popular music from the French-speaking world, and consider song as a reflection of social, political and cultural movements. Coursework will include listening to and viewing performances, and reading historical and critical texts on popular song. Examples will be drawn from French, Canadian and Francophone African song repertoires of various eras, and may also include music from other French-speaking territories. Students will learn terminology in French used to describe and analyze music. No previous musical experience necessary. Prerequisite: FREN 212 or equivalent. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • FREN 327: Introduction to French Culture
    Study of the language through an introduction to French culture. The course aims at familiarizing students with the history, current trends, and mentality of the French while enriching their understanding of the language. Prerequisite: French 212 or equivalent. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • FREN 328: Contemporary France
    This course will address current subjects of debate in France and study how France has changed (politically and socially) since its major period of decolonization in the 1950s-60s. Particular attention will be given to France's efforts to integrate immigrants, and specific issues related to French residents of Muslim heritage. Through the reading and discussion of literature and critical essays, as well as viewing current films and internet/satellite news broadcasts, students will gain greater understanding of France's changing identity. Oral and written competence will be enhanced by discussion, debate, presentation, and writing short papers in French. Prerequisite: FREN 212 or equivalent. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ISLM 328
  • FREN 330: The French-Speaking World
    This course will familiarize students with the history, politics and contemporary culture of various areas of the French-speaking world (such as in Canada, Africa, the Middle East and Western Europe); particular attention will be paid to areas of the French-speaking Islamic World. Topics will vary, and may include discussion of immigration, women's issues, political conflict, changing social and national identity. The course will draw from film, literature, critical materials and contemporary news sources. Prerequisite: French 212 or equivalent. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement.)
    ISLM 330
  • FREN 338: Cinema Francais
    This interdisciplinary course provides an overview of French cinematic history, with an emphasis on how French films and movements represent various social and political concerns of their time period. Film will be studied as an art form and cultural text to be interpreted, and films by major directors will illustrate key cinematic concepts and themes. Readings will address the socio-political context, from French film beginnings to the complexity of post-colonial French identity and cultural globalization depicted in contemporary French and Francophone films. This course is discussion-based,with occasional lectures, is taught in French, and will acquaint students with cinematic terms used to interpret the genre. Prerequisite: FREN212 or equivalent. Not open to students who have completed FREN 333: French Culture Through Film in English. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement.)
    CINE 338
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  • FREN 390: Internship
    On-site training in spoken and written French at businesses or other organizations in Paris, France, or in Chicago. Students have been assigned to such organizations as the French government tourist office, The Alliance Francaise, and the Services Culturels Francais in Chicago. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • FREN 460: French Narrative
    Reading and discussion with a view to increasing appreciation of several related novels, works of shorter fiction, or essays. The works are selected for their value as turning points in the understanding of the art of prose fiction and as examples of a particular stage in the development of that art. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: One 300-level course in French. (May be taken by French majors to meet GEC Senior Studies Requirement.)
  • FREN 465: Adventure Stories in French
    This course is a study of adventure stories from a wide variety of French-speaking countries and time periods, including but not limited to prose, poetry and graphic novels, chosen for their ability to both entertain and educate the reader. Students will write and present critical, researched analyses of texts, and carry out advanced work in the language. Emphasis will be given to the historical and cultural contexts in which these stories were created. Prerequisite: One 300-level course in French or permission of the instructor. May be taken by French majors to meet Senior Studies Requirement. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • FREN 470: Modern French Poetry
    An analysis of works representative of crucial moments in modern French poetry. The essentials of French versification are stressed, as well as the distinctive character of the various forms within the genre. Not open to students who have taken FREN 370. Prerequisite: One 300-level course in French. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement. May be taken by French majors to meet GEC Senior Studies Requirement).
  • FREN 490: Internship
    On-site training in spoken and written French at businesses or other organizations in Paris, France, or in Chicago. Students have been assigned to such organizations as the French government tourist office, The Alliance Française, and the Services Culturels Français in Chicago. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • FREN 494: Senior Thesis
    The thesis allows students to do in-depth research and to develop an original thesis on a topic in French literature, literatures of the French-speaking world, French civilization, or linguistics. (Offered as required.)

 

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  • GERM 110: Beginning German I
    Intensive training in the aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing of German, combined with an introduction to the culture of the German-speaking countries. The two-semester sequence provides a basic active command of the patterns and essential vocabulary for conversation and writing, while developing the student's ability to read text passages with accurate comprehension. Prerequisite for German 112: placement recommendation or a grade of C or better in German 110.
  • GERM 112: Beginning German II
    Intensive training in the aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing of German, combined with an introduction to the culture of the German-speaking countries. The two-semester sequence provides a basic active command of the patterns and essential vocabulary for conversation and writing, while developing the student's ability to read text passages with accurate comprehension. Prerequisite for German 112: placement recommendation or a grade of C or better in German 110.
  • GERM 210: Intermediate German
    Practice in reading contemporary fiction and expository prose to develop reading ease and accurate comprehension beyond the elementary level. Classroom discussions and guided compositions, review of grammar topics, lab exercises. Prerequisite: German 112 or the equivalent of one year of college German and placement recommendation. (Offered as a Tutorial.)
  • GERM 212: Advanced Intermediate German
    Additional practice in reading contemporary fiction and expository prose. Classroom discussions, further review of grammar topics as needed. Prerequisite: German 210 or the equivalent. (Offered as a Tutorial.)
  • GERM 333: Modern German Film
    In our overview of German film from its inception to the opening of the 21st century, students examine and discuss famous as well as off-beat masterpieces of cinema from the perspectives of political and cultural history as well as specifically cinematic aesthetics. The course views and debates films (subtitled in English) by such noted filmmakers as Lang, Fassbinder, Herzog, Schlöndorff, Wenders, Holland, Verhoeven and Fatih Akin. Readings, lectures, and discussions are in English, and the course encourages comparisons with films from other cultures, including popular Hollywood cinema. Prerequisite: a course that develops analytic-interpretive skills, such as, but not limited to: ENGL 210, ENGL 211, ENGL 212, ENGL 216, ENGL 217, COMM 255, or COMM 275; or permission of instructor. (Offered as a Tutorial.)
    CINE 336
  • GERM 395: Advanced Topics, Special Studies
    The course will provide students with an opportunity to work on their written and spoken German skills, with a review of German grammar as applied to discussion of current events, literary texts, opera and theater, on-line resources in many fields, and film. Students will also learn new vocabulary in context and present topics of interest to the class in German. The topics in any given semester will be adapted to student interest and needs. (Offered as a Tutorial.)
  • GERM 400: Special Studies
    One author, theme, movement, or group of works in German literature studied in depth. (Offered as a Tutorial.)

 

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  • HIST 110: World Civilizations
    (Introduction to Historical Study: World Civilizations.) This course offers an introduction to college-level study of history. Specific subjects covered will vary, but a significant amount of the course will focus on non-Western history. Topics may include: the origins of civilizations in the Middle East, Asia, and the Americas; the role of religion in society; the rise and fall of empires; encounters between civilizations, from ancient trade networks to modern colonialism. Students in all sections will be introduced to certain key skills and methodology used by historians, including analysis of primary sources and assessment of historical arguments. Close attention will be paid to the development of critical reading and writing skills. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • HIST 200: Foundations American Republic
    (Foundations of the American Republic) The origins of American society and the development of the United States from an under-developed new nation into a powerful national entity. Emphasis on the reading and analysis of documentary materials.
    AMER 210
  • HIST 201: Modern America
    America's response to industrialism and its changing role in foreign affairs. Emphasis on the techniques of research and paper writing.
    AMER 211
  • HIST 204: Roman History
    This course examines the history of Italy and the Mediterranean world during the thousand-plus years of Roman rule. We begin with Rome's establishment as a small city-state, as recorded in both legend and archaeological evidence. We chart Rome's political development and imperial expansion under the republic, study the career of Augustus and the revolution by which he transformed Rome into an empire, and conclude with that empire's fragmentation into the Byzantine, Latin Christian, and Islamic worlds. The topics studied will include: key political institutions and leaders; war, imperialism, and their consequences, including slavery and social unrest; the work of authors such as Cicero, Vergil, Seneca, and Marcus Aurelius; the varied Roman religious scene and the rise of Christianity and Islam; Roman social history, including class, marriage, and slavery. Students will work extensively with primary documents in translation.
    CLAS 211
  • HIST 205: Medieval History
    This course examines the history of Europe and the Mediterranean world in the years 300-1500 CE. We begin with the fragmentation of the Roman Empire into three areas: Latin Christian Europe, the Byzantine Empire, and the Islamic world. We then explore the richness of the medieval centuries, including: aspects of medieval Christianity ranging from the cult of saints to monasticism to the papacy; the development of the major European kingdoms, knighthood, and chivalry; intellectual life and the rise of universities; interactions between Christians, Jews, and Muslims both peaceful (trade) and hostile (crusade); lives of ordinary people in urban and rural settings. Students will work extensively with primary documents in translation.
  • HIST 208: Europe 1715-1890
    Socio-economic, political, and intellectual and cultural development of Europe from 1715 to 1890. The crisis of the old order in the age of the Enlightenment and the French Revolution. Industrialization, democratization, and modernization in the nineteenth century. The emergence of nation-states, consumer societies, and modern ideologies.
    IREL 220
  • HIST 209: Europe in the Twentieth Century
    European politics, culture, and society from 1890s to 1990s. The course pursues three major themes: the origins of the modern era from 1890 to 1918; the rise of the authoritarian state from 1917 to 1945; and the Cold War from the 1940s to the collapse of the Soviet Union.
    IREL 221
  • HIST 212: Origins of East Asia
    Introduction to the great civilizations of China and Japan, with emphasis on development of their fundamental characteristics. Highlights both shared traditions and significant differences between the two countries. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ASIA 200, IREL 233
  • HIST 213: Modern East Asia
    Study of China, Japan, and Korea as each moved toward modern nationhood over the last 200 years. Attention to the difficulties each has confronted, including Japan's vision of empire shattered by World War II, China's civil war, and Korea's transformation through foreign interventions. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ASIA 201, IREL 234
  • HIST 220: Colonial America
    This course is an interpretive survey of American Colonial history in the context of a broad Atlantic system from 1492 to 1763. The colonial period was the first era of globalization, when peoples of Europe, Africa, and the Americas came together in new economic, social, and cultural configurations. In this class we will explore this period not only as the first chapter in American history, but more broadly as a hugely transformative era in World history. A main component of this course is attention to ordinary people in early America through research in primary sources.
    AMER 249
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  • HIST 222: American Revolution
    To quote the historian Gordon Wood, the American Revolution 'was the most radical and far-reaching event in American history.' In this course we examine this momentous Founding Age of the United States, with a special focus on the ideas that shaped this period. We explore the growing estrangement of American colonies from Great Britain and the culmination of this process in the Declaration of Independence. Then we look at the process and controversies involved in creating a new nation, and the United States government.
    AMER 253
  • HIST 224: The New American Nation 1787-1848
    This course covers America's 'Founding Period' from the end of the Revolution through the conclusion of the U.S.-Mexican War. During this time, Americans gradually came to see themselves as part of a unified nation with its own distinctive culture and ideals, though this outcome was far from certain. Beginning with the Constitution and the uncertain legacies of the American Revolution, the course considers the fundamental political, social, and cultural problems that could easily have torn the young Republic apart. Topics and themes include the problems of democracy and popular politics, the limits of citizenship, the formation of a distinctive American culture, the place of America on the world stage, the transition to capitalism and the 'market revolution,' and the figure of Andrew Jackson.
    AMER 271
  • HIST 226: American Civil War
    The origins of the war in the antagonistic development of the free North and slave South; Lincoln and the Republican Party; Black activity in the North and South; the war; the transforming and gendered aspects of fighting the war; Reconstruction; the impact of the war on American development.
    AMER 250
  • HIST 228: Inequality and Reform: US 1865-1920
    This course offers an introduction to the political, social, and cultural history of the United States between Reconstruction and World War I, as the country rebuilt and reimagined itself in the wake of the Civil War and the end of slavery. We will pay special attention to new patterns of inequality in the contexts of industrialization, urbanization, and immigration. We will also examine the complexities and contradictions of progressive reform movements, including efforts to improve housing, sanitation, and labor conditions. We will look at how those transformations affected people's everyday lives and conceptions of American citizenship, and we will explore the emergence of popular mass culture through photography, art, architecture, advertising, and films. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    AMER 276
  • HIST 230: African-American History
    A survey of African American history from the sixteenth century to the present, with attention to important themes and events: the African heritage; slavery and the response to bondage; emancipation and reconstruction; African American society under Jim Crow; the northern migrations and the making of the urban ghettos; African American debates on freedom and models of Black leadership in the twentieth century; aspects of contemporary African American America. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    AFAM 254
  • HIST 231: American Indian Country, 1500-2000
    This course is a survey of North American Indian history from pre-colonization to the present, with emphasis on the centrality of Indians to U.S. history. Many people know little about American Indians beyond popular stereotypes and a vague narrative that casts Indians either as hostile enemies to progress or environmentally sensitive victims of American territorial expansion. This course will build on the proliferation of scholarship on native peoples in the last fifty years, which has restored Indians to their role as historical actors and demonstrated the complex economic, social, and cultural dynamics of Indian/white relations. Indian country did not disappear at the conclusion of the 19th-century Plains Wars, nor did Indians "vanish." This course will connect Indian history to issues related to nation-building, citizenship, economic change, and multiculturalism. Students will work with both scholarship and primary sources on Indian history; we will also visit local archives and museums with important Indian collections. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • HIST 232: American Environmental History
    Introduction to the historical study of the relationship of Americans with the natural world. Examination of the ways that 'natural' forces helped shape American history; the ways human beings have altered and interacted with nature over time; and the ways cultural, philosophical, scientific, and political attitudes towards the environment have changed in the course of American history, pre-history to the present.
    AMER 261, ES 260
  • HIST 234: Witches, Preachers, and Mystics
    In this course students consider the historical development of religion in the United States of America. We study topics such as the contact between Native Americans and European settlers, religion and the founding of the Republic, religious revivals and awakenings, immigration and religion, the rise of new forms of religion in the United States, responses to scientific and technological developments, and the entangling of religion and politics. The course covers religion from the colonial period to the dawn of the twentieth century. No prerequisites.
    RELG 234, AMER 234
  • HIST 235: American Cities
    The changing functions, scale, and quality of urban society from the seventeenth century to the present. A historical framework for studying modern American metropolitan problems. Some fieldwork in Chicago.
    AMER 263, ES 263
  • HIST 237: US and World History
    This course examines US history from various perspectives to show not only that it has been both similar to and different than that of other nations, but also that it cannot be separated from world developments. Examples of perspectives to be used include the following: a comparative viewpoint that looks at key moments and developments, i.e., the abolition of slavery, as they occurred throughout the world; a transnational approach that embeds US history at every significant moment, e.g., industrialization, in its connections to ongoing global events and processes; a diasporic standpoint that puts the voluntary and forced movement of peoples at the center of the evolution of US society; a political-economic critique that places the origins and development of capitalism at the center of world history since the fourteenth century.
    AMER 267, IREL 222
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  • HIST 239: History of Educ in American Society
    (History of Education in American Society) Historical role of education in American society; education as a panacea and as a practical solution; schooling vs. education. Emphasis is on the twentieth century.
    AMER 270, EDUC 239
  • HIST 240: Ancient Greece
    Greek civilization from the first awakening of reason in Homeric poetry and early philosophy to the spread throughout the Mediterranean world of a civilization of headlong, revolutionary innovation in every department of life and thought. Key episodes of the intellectual, political, and military history of the Greeks examined through examples of their literature and thought.
    CLAS 210
  • HIST 243: Crusade & Holy War in Med Europe
    (Crusade and Holy War in Medieval Europe) Medieval Europe experienced widespread debate about the use of violence by Christians. The course considers early definitions of Just War and the attempts by the church to control violence around the year 1000. Detailed examination of the origin of the idea of crusade and the history of the First Crusade (1095-99) from Christian, Jewish, Greek, and Muslim perspectives. Examines the later medieval phenomenon of crusade against other Christians.
    RELG 248, ISLM 243
  • HIST 246: Renaissance and Reformation
    This course begins with Europe at the end of the Middle Ages, alive with cultural ferment and religious debate but reeling from the carnage of the Black Death. We then turn to an in-depth examination of the years 1400-1600, including: the development of sovereign states and political theory on proper governance, divine right, and resistance to royal rule; the impact of key technological innovations such as printing and gunpowder; the discovery of the Americas and the origins of worldwide European colonialism; the spread of mercantile and industrial capitalism and international trade systems; the flowering of culture, art, and science known as the Renaissance; the emergence of Protestant and Catholic visions of religious reform and the wars and persecutions that resulted. Students will work extensively with primary documents in translation as well as key works of scholarship.
  • HIST 250: Modern British History
    The history of Britain since 1688. Topics include aristocracy and society in the eighteenth century, the Industrial Revolution, Liberalism and Conservatism in nineteenth-century politics, the consolidation of British culture, the rise of the welfare state, and contemporary British life.
    IREL 223
  • HIST 255: History of Russia
    Survey of the political, social, and intellectual history of Russia from the early medieval period to the post-Soviet era. Emphasis on the people and the state, efforts at modernization from above (particularly those of Peter the Great and Stalin), revolutionary ideas and movements, the disintegration of the Communist system and the Soviet empire, and the difficulties faced by Russia and other post-Soviet states. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    IREL 225
  • HIST 257: World War II: Europe
    Among topics to be studied: origins of the European war; the defeat of France; the Battle of Britain; the German attack on Russia; the Holocaust; the defeat of Germany; the impact of the war after 1945. In this course there will be a strong emphasis on film as an historical source.
    IREL 226
  • HIST 260: Modern China
    Relying as much as possible on Chinese texts (in translation), this course will examine such topics as China's response to Western imperialism in the nineteenth century; the 1911 Revolution; the May Fourth Movement; the birth of the People's Republic of China; the Cultural Revolution; and the Democracy Movement of the 1980s. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ASIA 283, IREL 230
  • HIST 262: Modern Japan
    From the founding of the last shogunate, the Tokugawa, in 1603 to its present status as an economic giant among the nations of the Pacific. Attention to the achievements as well as the undeniable sufferings and costs incurred during Japan's drive toward great power. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ASIA 286, IREL 231
  • HIST 264: World War II in Asia
    Through lecture and discussion, we will look at the origins of the war; the invasion of China and the Rape of Nanking; battle at sea and on the mainland of Asia; surrender; lives of individual soldiers, diplomats, refugees, POWs, 'comfort women,' collaborators, and guerrillas; and continuing controversies over memory, apology, reparation, and national identity. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement).
    ASIA 284, IREL 232
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  • HIST 270: Latin American History
    This course will introduce students to major transformations in Latin American history from the Pre-Columbian era to the present, including in Mexico, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean. We will examine the social, political, and economic institutions that shaped the colonial system; we will then study how a diverse set of actors created independent nations in the early nineteenth century. We will conclude by exploring the important influence exerted by the United States as these new Latin American nations consolidated their cultural identity, forms of government, and territorial borders. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    LNAM 270, IREL 227
  • HIST 272: History of Mexico
    This course broadly surveys Mexican history from the pre-Conquest period to the Chiapas revolt in 1994. The meaning of progress, the sacred and indigenous culture, imperialism's impact, and popular mobilization are among its recurring themes. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    LNAM 257, IREL 228
  • HIST 280: History of Science
    An overview of the history of science from ancient to modern times. Explores the philosophical question, 'What is Science?' Introduces the ideas of major figures within the history of science, such as Aristotle, Galileo, Newton, Darwin, and Einstein, as well as general developments in the physical and biological sciences. Examines how these ideas were influenced within their own historical context by both internal (scientific) and external (cultural, religious, sociological, psychological) factors, and how these ideas are central to our world today.
  • HIST 283: History of Emotions in the West
    (Thinking about Feeling: History of Emotions in the West.) Emotions were once considered stable and universal: love was always love, and fear always evidence of irredeemable cowardice. Recently, however, historians have found significant variations in expression and regulation of emotions in different periods and cultures. This course will examine ideas surrounding emotion in the West from Late Antiquity through the Early Modern period. The study of emotions raises a variety of historical questions: how do we research the history of something as intangible as emotions? Should historians use the theories and methodologies of other disciplines? Have institutions and belief systems mobilized particular emotions? Have norms and expectations for emotion changed over time? What is the relationship between the experience and expression of emotion? We will also explore some of the established narratives in the history of emotions, such as the "hydraulic model" and the rise of the affectionate family. No prerequisites.
  • HIST 284: Epidemic Disease in Western History
    This course will focus on four epidemic diseases that caused widespread death and destruction in Europe and the Americas from the fourteenth to twentieth centuries: the Black Death, smallpox, cholera, and malaria. In each case, after learning about the symptoms of the disease, the progression of the epidemic(s), and the identity of the victims, we will explore multiple facets of the human response to these natural disasters, including: theories of disease; religious responses; medical measures; artistic representations; and the intersection of state power and public health efforts. We will also study key figures in the history of medicine. A significant portion of the course is devoted to the impact of disease in European imperial possessions (such as India and the Americas), violence against minority groups (notably Jews) in Europe in the wake of epidemics, and the ways in which theories of class and race influenced European thinking on disease. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement).
  • HIST 285: Public History
    Public history is the practice of history outside the academy. Public historians record and preserve evidence of the past in many formats, analyzing and interpreting their findings to general and specialized audiences beyond the traditional classroom setting. This course will survey the theory and practice of various professional historical specialties - ranging from archival administration to historic site management, museum exhibitions, and historical reenactment. Institutional constraints, audience development, and conflicts between history and public memory will be major thematic issues. Field trips to institutions and sites in the Chicago metropolitan area.
    AMER 240
  • HIST 288: Women in Modern History
    This course examines women's lives, activities, and cultures in the United States and Europe from the late eighteenth century to the present. Among the issues examined are birth control; equality vs. difference (the essentialism debate); race and class; and gender as an analytical concept. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    GSWS 271
  • HIST 300: Theory and Methods
    How can we know what actually happened in the past? This course examines the bases of historical knowledge and interpretation, and studies methods used for understanding and writing about the past. Emphases include the use of documentary evidence, the analysis of conflicting historical interpretations, and the use of the Web as a research tool. Prerequisite: an introductory history course. Required of all history majors.
  • HIST 302: Colonial America
    Origins of European colonialism; Indian-European relations; Puritanism and society in New England; slavery and politics in Virginia; English imperial regulations; the Glorious Revolution; and the Great Awakening. Prerequisite: History 200.
  • HIST 306: Civil Rights Movement
    This course focuses on the origins, development, and accomplishments of the civil rights movement in post-World War II America. Particular emphasis will be given to the differences between the struggle for black equality in the south and its northern counterpart. Taught in a seminar format, the class will be both reading- and writing-intensive. Course readings and paper assignments are designed to help students develop a comparative analytical framework and to illuminate the following lines of inquiry: What caused and what sustained the civil rights movement? What changes took place within the movement over time, particularly at the level of leadership? What underlay the radicalization of the movement and what were the consequences? To what extent did the civil rights movement succeed and how do we measure that success today? Finally, how did the black civil rights movement inspire other groups and minorities in American society to organize? Prerequisite: History 200 or History 201. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    AFAM 361, AMER 361
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  • HIST 308: Sport and Spectacle Modern America
    This course considers the history of sport as mass entertainment from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. More than an escape from everyday life, the games Americans have played and watched have been thick with social, cultural, and political meanings. Athletes and spectators alike have defined and challenged ideas of gender, race, and the body; they have worked out class antagonisms, expressed national identities, and promoted social change. Topics include: the construction of race; definitions of manhood and womanhood; industrialization, urbanization, and the rise of modern spectator sport; media and mass spectacle; fitness and athletic reform movements; collegiate athletics; sports figures and social change. Prerequisite: History 200 or 201, or permission of the instructor.
    AMER 308
  • HIST 310: The American West
    History of the American West as both frontier and region, real and imagined, from the first contacts between natives and colonizers to the multicultural communities of the late-twentieth century. Examining both history and myth, we consider the legacy of Western expansion and evaluate Frederick Jackson Turner's famous argument that the West fundamentally shaped American history. Prerequisite: History 200 or 201 or permission of the instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement.)
    AMER 352
  • HIST 312: American Social History
    Conducted as a seminar. Topics include family, class, gender, race, ethnicity, and work. Prerequisite: History 200 or 201, or permission of the instructor.
    AMER 355
  • HIST 314: American Cultural History
    This course introduces the craft and method of cultural history. Although it begins with the story of a cat massacre in eighteenth-century France, the course focuses on American art, literature, music, advertisements, and other forms of popular culture from the eighteenth century to the present. Students will use these types of evidence to understand how Americans made sense of events and transformations in the world around them. Topics will include eighteenth-century architecture, the illicit press of nineteenth-century New York, the showmanship of P.T. Barnum, early photography, the figure of the self-made man, blackface minstrelsy, early Wild West shows, 1920s advertising, and World War II pinups. All these examples will offer models for reading and interpreting cultural forms for historical meanings of gender, race, and identity. Students will work with the instructor to choose research topics for a seminar project of their own. Prerequisites: History 200 or 201, or permission of the instructor.
    AMER 357
  • HIST 315: US Catholic Immigrant Experience
    From the Irish who arrived before the Civil War to the Mexicans and Vietnamese who have come recently, the Catholic experience in the US has been a continuing story of immigration. This course examines how succeeding immigrant groups have practiced and lived their Catholic faith in different times and places. Religion cannot be separated from the larger social and economic context in which it is embedded, so the course will also pay attention to the ways in which the social and economic conditions that greeted the immigrants on their arrival shaped how they went about praying and working. Finally, the changing leadership of the Catholic Church will be taken into account, since it provided the ecclesiastical framework for the new Catholic arrivals. Prerequisite: HIST 200 or HIST 201 or permission of the instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    AMER 315, RELG 315
  • HIST 316: American Thought
    An examination of major currents of American thought with special emphasis on the ways Americans have thought about their relationship with their environment: Puritanism, Jefferson and nature, Emerson and Thoreau's romanticism, Darwinism, and the modern environmental movement. Prerequisites: History 200, 201, an introductory course in American literature, or permission of the instructor.
  • HIST 318: Chicago: History and Public Memory
    This course examines the development of metropolitan Chicago in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and the sites, landmarks, and institutions which preserve and interpret aspects of that past. Students will become familiar with urban history and heritage preservation scholarship and will utilize these perspectives to analyze existing historic sites and identify, research, and create interpretive plans for sites not currently included in the metropolitan repertoire of public remembrance. Substantial field study. Prerequisite: one course in American history, politics, African American Studies or American Studies, or permission of the instructor.
  • HIST 322: Roman and Medieval Christianity
    This course will examine key questions debated by Christians from the origins of the faith in the Roman era to the end of the Middle Ages, many of which continue to be discussed today. These may include: should Christians use violence at all, and if so, under what circumstances? What is the correct relationship between the Church and the government? What makes a person a saint - celibacy? Harsh asceticism? Aiding the poor? Preaching the Gospel? What is the appropriate role of wealth and property in the life of a dedicated Christian? Should a Christian seeking religious truth rely only on the Bible and revelation, or do logic and scientific inquiry have a role to play? Students will work extensively with primary sources in translation and significant works of modern scholarship. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    RELG 307
  • HIST 324: Charlemagne: His World
    Since his death, Charlemagne has remained one of the most revered and evocative figures of the early Middle Ages. He and his family built a formidable empire, revolutionized thinking about kingship and government, and presided over reforms in religion, scholarship, and art. This course considers the achievements of the Carolingian period, the consequences of the collapse of their power, and the development of the legend of Charlemagne.
  • HIST 326: Identity/Body/Persecution Med Europ
    (Identity, Body, and Persecution in Medieval Europe) Medieval men and women discussed many of the same questions of identity that we do: What makes an individual unique? How does group affiliation affect identity? What is the relationship between identity and change? How does faith in God influence understanding of the individual? This course considers the following topics: medieval conceptions of the individual in Christian autobiography; the role of the body and gender in determining identity (exploring topics such as the Eucharist, the cult of saints, and sex difference); how medieval Europeans defined their own identity by persecuting the 'other,' including heretics, Jews, and lepers; how change affected identity in medieval texts such as werewolf stories and resurrection theology.
    GSWS 305, RELG 326
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  • HIST 328: European Reformations, 1200-1600
    The Protestant Reformation and Catholic Counter-Reformation were a major turning-point in the political, social and religious history of the West. This course will examine: the background to the Reformations in Pauline and Augustinian theology and medieval reform movements; the writings of key figures including Luther, Calvin, Zwingli, and Loyola; the political and social ramifications of the Reformations, particularly in France, England, and the German Empire; the tradition of historiography on the Reformations.
    RELG 319
  • HIST 330: The Enlightenment
    Readings and discussions of the central ideas of Europe in the eighteenth century, with emphasis on Britain and France. Topics include the social and political context of the Enlightenment, the impact of science, and the development of notions of tolerance, freedom, and rationality.
  • HIST 332: European Romanticism
    Intellectual and social origins of Romanticism, with emphasis on Germany and England; impact of the French Revolution; individualism in poetry and art; and the rise of historicism. Works discussed will include those by Goethe, Wordsworth, Keats, Hugo, Constable, and Schleiermacher.
  • HIST 335: 20th Cent British Culture
    (20th Century British Culture) British culture since 1900. Topics include the impact of World War I; the Bloomsbury circle; documentary writing and film; working-class realism in the 1950s; youth culture; the New Left; postimperial culture; and postmodernism.
    IREL 331
  • HIST 337: The Russian Revolution
    This course provides a close study of the causes, processes and results of the Russian Revolution. Topics to be considered include: the broad historical background needed to understand the Russian revolutions of the 20th century; the causes and results of the 1905 Revolution; the impact of World War I; a close look at both the February and October revolutions of 1917; the creation of the new Soviet regime and the Civil War that shaped it; the ambiguous era of the 1920s; Stalin's 'Second Revolution' and the era of the Five Year Plans and collectivization of agriculture; the bloodletting of the Great Purges of the 1930s. Prerequisite: History 209 or 255 or permission of the instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    IREL 327
  • HIST 338: Literature and Society in Russia
    Aspects of the social and intellectual history of tsarist and Soviet Russia through the prism of nineteenth- and twentieth-century fiction, mostly novels. Readings will include major works by such authors as Pushkin, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Gorky, Pasternak, Akhmatova, Babel, Kataev, Bulgakov, Solzhenitsyn, Yevtushenko, and Tolstoya. Films will also be used. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • HIST 340: Topics in East Asian History
    Spring 2015 Topic: China's Cultural Revolution.The Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, broke out more than thirty years ago (1966-1976), has been recognized as the darkest era in the history of the People's Republic of China. A comprehensive mass movement initiated by Mao Zedong to eliminate the so-called 'counterrevolutionary elements' in the country's institutions and leadership, the revolution was characterized by nationwide chaos, ultra-leftist frenzy, political zealotry, purges of intellectuals, extreme social turmoil, and ultimate economic collapse. This course intends to reconstruct the history of the Cultural Revolution by revealing the causes of the calamity and prevent human disaster from repeating itself in the future. Prerequisite: One course in Asian history or permission of the instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement)
    ASIA 307, IREL 330
  • HIST 341: Doing Business in/with China
    This course is aimed at students who are interested in a career involving business in China, who plan to apply to business school, or who are interested in Chinese business history. The course offers a theoretical framework for understanding Chinese business, commercial culture, and entrepreneurship patterns, as well as a practical guide to business practices, market conditions, negotiation techniques, and relevant organizations and networks in China. The course utilizes an interdisciplinary approach to examine China's business history, focusing on three separate but interrelated themes: America's "China Dream" in the past; doing business in China in the 21st century; and the "Panda Huggers' dilemma" in the future. The ultimate goal of the course is to equip students who are interested in doing business in or with China with the background knowledge and analytical skills to aid future careers and business endeavors. The course is open to all majors in the College with no prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    IREL 333
  • HIST 342: Problems Modern Chinese Hist: Film
    (Problems in Modern Chinese History: Film) What are the enduring problems of modern China? How have different Chinese governments confronted them? We will study twentieth-century transformations in Chinese society, politics, and culture on the mainland and Taiwan in the light of modern Chinese and international history through film and discussion of the major issues addressed by Western scholarship. Basic topics to be covered include Sino-Western relations; tradition and modernization; peasant rebellions; revolution and reforms; religion; culture and society; modern science; and intellectuals and the state. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ASIA 309, IREL 332
  • HIST 360: History and the Moving Image
    This course explores the role of moving images (film, television, internet) in understanding history as both collective process and contested interpretation. The course will integrate a discussion of recent historical methodologies concerning moving images, with examples from a variety of forms, including historical epics, documentaries, propaganda, television series, literary adaptations, and biographies. Special emphasis will be placed upon the ambiguities of historical context, including the time of production, the period depicted, and changing audiences over time. Topics include: 'Feudal Codes of Conduct in Democratic Societies,' 'Film as Foundation Myth for Totalitarian Ideologies' and 'Situation Comedy of the 1970s as Social History.' Prerequisite: Two history courses or permission of the instructor.
    AMER 340, CINE 360
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  • HIST 362: History and Literature
    An interdisciplinary opportunity to investigate one seminal era. Topics include the 'lost' world of early modern family and social life; the English Reformation; the aristocracy and the rise of the gentry; Renaissance heroism and 'self-fashioning'; women's lives and literature; early modern biography and lyric subjectivity; Tudor and Stuart monarchy; the causes of the English Civil War; and the emergence of the scientific worldview. Prerequisite: either one English or one history course at the 200 level or above.
  • HIST 364: Topics in Gender and History
    A seminar that examines in depth one aspect of gender and history. Topics vary from year to year. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    AMER 347, GSWS 347
  • HIST 366: Science, Religion, and Modernity
    Western science from the late Middle Ages to 1900, explored through the lens of its developing relationship with religion and connection to modernity. Themes of the course involve the laws of nature, measurement, scientific methods, promotional and oversight organizations, and materialism. Case studies include Roger Bacon's science, Galileo's travails, Francis Bacon's vision, physico-theology, Newton versus Leibniz, Enlightenment scientific societies, physiological psychology around 1750, Genesis and geology, the reception of Darwin, and the warfare between science and religion.
  • HIST 368: Museums and Exhibitions
    History is an academic discipline but it also has a public face. 'Public history,' through museum exhibitions, historical sites, the Internet, and other venues, is a growing career field. Students in this class will learn the communication tools necessary to produce an engaging and intellectually sound exhibit, including the techniques of oral history. The class will develop a concept, research in local archives, write label copy, and design and install an exhibit. We may use audio, video, photography, and the web to tell our story. The exhibition will be presented in the Sonnenschein Gallery or a local history museum, such as the Lake County Museum. The course will include field studies to Chicago-area history museums. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing, or permission of the instructor.
    AMER 348
  • HIST 420: Senior Seminar
    Selected advanced topics in history, with attention to the methods and problems of historical research. Each student will write a major research paper. Required of all history majors in their junior or senior year except those doing independent study research projects. Open to non-majors with appropriate preparation and permission of the instructor.

 

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  • HSEM 290: What Makes a Great Leader?
    How do we recognize a good leader? Is a just or effective leader the same as a great leader? Materials will be drawn from literature, film, and biographies, as well as more theoretical readings from the humanities and social sciences, as we try to answer these very important questions. We will consider specific examples of good and bad leadership (fictional or historical) from a variety of realms, such as politics, social movements, religion, the arts, education, law, science, and public intellectualism. Open to sophomore or junior Honors Fellows, and others with permission of the Honors Fellows Committee.
    ETHC 290

 

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  • IREL 110: Principles of Economics
    An introduction to both microeconomics, the theory of consumer and producer behavior, and macroeconomics, the determination of aggregate levels of production, employment, inflation, and growth. Application of economic principles to the analysis of current problems of the U.S. economy.
    ECON 110
  • IREL 140: Introduction to Global Politics
    This course is an introduction to the main concepts and theories of comparative politics and international relations. Students investigate the democratic and non-democratic political systems and current political issues across the developed and developing worlds; war and peace; prosperity and poverty; and the political ideologies that have shaped politics within and among nations in the modern era.
    POLS 110
  • IREL 160: Intro to Sociology and Anthropology
    An inquiry into the social (group rather than individual) bases of human practices and human life: an unfamiliar but revealing perspective on the familiar world. Limited to first- and second-year students.
    SOAN 110
  • IREL 212: Macroeconomic Theory
    Analysis of the determinants of aggregate production, prices, interest rates, and employment in macroeconomic models that combine the business, household, government, and financial sectors. Prerequisites: ECON 110 and MATH 110 or MATH 160 with grades of C- or better.
    ECON 220
  • IREL 213: Principles of Marketing
    Analysis of how marketing concepts impact an organization through the development of the marketing mix (product, price, place and promotion). Building upon these concepts, students will develop an understanding of how marketing managers develop specific strategies in order to gain competitive advantage in a global economy (formerly BUSN 345). No prerequisites.
    BUSN 225, ENTP 225
  • IREL 215: Child Labor in Latin America
    Explores the role of child labor in the economies of developing Latin American countries, focusing on the question 'Do countries need to use child labor to industrialize?' Historically, industrialized countries have relied heavily on children to work in factories and mines. Today it appears history is repeating itself as developing countries utilize children in the informal sectors. The employment of children in Brazil, Colombia, Peru, Chile, and Argentina will be examined in detail. The economic, political, social/cultural, and technological explanations for child labor will be explored for each country. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.) Prerequisite: ECON 110.
    ECON 245, LNAM 245
  • IREL 220: Europe 1715-1890
    Socio-economic, political, and intellectual and cultural development of Europe from 1715 to 1890. The crisis of the old order in the age of the Enlightenment and the French Revolution. Industrialization, democratization, and modernization in the nineteenth century. The emergence of nation-states, consumer societies, and modern ideologies.
    HIST 208
  • IREL 221: Europe in the Twentieth Century
    European politics, culture, and society from 1890s to 1990s. The course pursues three major themes: the origins of the modern era from 1890 to 1918; the rise of the authoritarian state from 1917 to 1945; and the Cold War from the 1940s to the collapse of the Soviet Union.
    HIST 209
  • IREL 222: US and World History
    This course examines US history from various perspectives to show not only that it has been both similar to and different than that of other nations, but also that it cannot be separated from world developments. Examples of perspectives to be used include the following: a comparative viewpoint that looks at key moments and developments, i.e., the abolition of slavery, as they occurred throughout the world; a transnational approach that embeds US history at every significant moment, e.g., industrialization, in its connections to ongoing global events and processes; a diasporic standpoint that puts the voluntary and forced movement of peoples at the center of the evolution of US society; a political-economic critique that places the origins and development of capitalism at the center of world history since the fourteenth century.
    HIST 237, AMER 267
  • IREL 223: Modern British History
    The history of Britain since 1688. Topics include aristocracy and society in the eighteenth century, the Industrial Revolution, Liberalism and Conservatism in nineteenth-century politics, the consolidation of British culture, the rise of the welfare state, and contemporary British life.
    HIST 250
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  • IREL 225: History of Russia
    Survey of the political, social, and intellectual history of Russia from the early medieval period to the post-Soviet era. Emphasis on the people and the state, efforts at modernization from above (particularly those of Peter the Great and Stalin), revolutionary ideas and movements, the disintegration of the Communist system and the Soviet empire, and the difficulties faced by Russia and other post-Soviet states. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    HIST 255
  • IREL 226: World War II: Europe
    Among topics to be studied: origins of the European war; the defeat of France; the Battle of Britain; the German attack on Russia; the Holocaust; the defeat of Germany; the impact of the war after 1945. In this course there will be a strong emphasis on film as an historical source.
    HIST 257
  • IREL 227: Latin American History
    This course will introduce students to major transformations in Latin American history from the Pre-Columbian era to the present, including in Mexico, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean. We will examine the social, political, and economic institutions that shaped the colonial system; we will then study how a diverse set of actors created independent nations in the early nineteenth century. We will conclude by exploring the important influence exerted by the United States as these new Latin American nations consolidated their cultural identity, forms of government, and territorial borders. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    HIST 270, LNAM 270
  • IREL 228: History of Mexico
    This course broadly surveys Mexican history from the pre-Conquest period to the Chiapas revolt in 1994. The meaning of progress, the sacred and indigenous culture, imperialism's impact, and popular mobilization are among its recurring themes. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    HIST 272, LNAM 257
  • IREL 230: Modern China
    Relying as much as possible on Chinese texts (in translation), this course will examine such topics as China's response to Western imperialism in the nineteenth century; the 1911 Revolution; the May Fourth Movement; the birth of the People's Republic of China; the Cultural Revolution; and the Democracy Movement of the 1980s. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    HIST 260, ASIA 283
  • IREL 231: Modern Japan
    From the founding of the last shogunate, the Tokugawa, in 1603 to its present status as an economic giant among the nations of the Pacific. Attention to the achievements as well as the undeniable sufferings and costs incurred during Japan's drive toward great power. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    HIST 262, ASIA 286
  • IREL 232: World War II in Asia
    Through lecture and discussion, we will look at the origins of the war; the invasion of China and the Rape of Nanking; battle at sea and on the mainland of Asia; surrender; lives of individual soldiers, diplomats, refugees, POWs, 'comfort women,' collaborators, and guerrillas; and continuing controversies over memory, apology, reparation, and national identity. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement).
    HIST 264, ASIA 284
  • IREL 233: Origins of East Asia
    Introduction to the great civilizations of China and Japan, with emphasis on development of their fundamental characteristics. Highlights both shared traditions and significant differences between the two countries. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    HIST 212, ASIA 200
  • IREL 234: Modern East Asia
    Study of China, Japan, and Korea as each moved toward modern nationhood over the last 200 years. Attention to the difficulties each has confronted, including Japan's vision of empire shattered by World War II, China's civil war, and Korea's transformation through foreign interventions. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    HIST 213, ASIA 201
  • IREL 240: American Foreign Policy
    Students in this course explore the major historical developments and ideologies that have shaped American foreign policy since the founding of the Republic. We also study the models of foreign policy decision-making and the foreign policy institutions of the national government on matters related to war and national security, trade and monetary policy, and the global environment. The role of civil society in foreign policy is also considered. Special emphasis is given to the post- 9/11 era.
    POLS 240, AMER 241
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  • IREL 241: Global Issues
    This course is a survey of the contemporary international politics of the great powers (e.g. United States, the European Union, Russia, Japan) and emerging powers (e.g., China, India, Brazil) in relation to contemporary issues in international economic, security, humanitarian, and environmental affairs. Special consideration is given to the implications of China's rise to global power on the U.S.- and Western- dominated international order.
    POLS 241
  • IREL 242: Politics of the Developing World
    This course highlights special topics relating to the domestic and international politics of developing countries, such as delayed industrialization, the lingering impact of colonialism, and recent trends in democratization and economic development and under-development. Recent trends related to the emergence of newly industrialized countries (NICs) are also considered. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    POLS 242
  • IREL 245: Theories of International Relations
    In this course, students survey the major theoretical models and concepts associated with the study of international relations for the purpose of analyzing and thinking critically about contemporary international political issues.
    POLS 245
  • IREL 249: Methods of Political Research
    This course introduces students to the nuts and bolts of systematic political science research. Students learn how to construct a research question - and develop and test hypotheses. Students apply concepts and strategies learned in class to develop their own research design. The course will also expose students to: basic quantitative and qualitative skills for the purposes of describing and explaining political phenomena, and the analysis of data on issues in American and global politics. Prerequisite: Politics or International Relations major, or consent of instructor.
    POLS 200
  • IREL 250: Politics of Europe
    This course is a survey of the domestic political institutions, cultures, and economies of select European countries, as well as the major public policy issues facing the advanced industrial democracies of Western Europe, the new democracies of Central and Eastern Europe, and the continent's last autocracies (e.g., Russia). Some consideration is also given to pan-European governance, such as the European Union (EU) and the European Court of Human Rights.
    POLS 210
  • IREL 251: Politics of Russia
    The course will investigate the domestic political processes, institutions, and economies of the Russian Federation and the other states in the post-Soviet Union. Additionally, the course examines Russia's foreign policy, paying close attention to the Russian Federation's actions toward its close neighbors. Prerequisites: POLS 110 or permission of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    POLS 218
  • IREL 255: Asian Politics
    We will study the political systems of countries in East, South, and Southeast Asia today and the international relations of Asia since the end of the Cold War. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    POLS 215
  • IREL 256: Politics of Middle East
    Study will focus on issues of modernization; the nature of Middle East governments; the past and present impact of religion on the region's culture and socio-political system; the Arab-Israeli conflict and its implications for world peace; and the impact of oil on the economy and regime stability in the Persian Gulf region. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    POLS 216, ISLM 216
  • IREL 259: Politics of Latin America
    An introduction to politics and social change in Latin America. Study will focus on several Latin American countries and on special topics such as human rights, religion, the military, land reform, women, and population policy. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    POLS 219, LNAM 219
  • IREL 260: Islam and Pop Culture
    In recent decades the global Islamic revival has produced a new generation of Muslim film stars and fashion models, Sufi self-help gurus, Muslim comic book heroes, romance novel writers, calligraphy artists, and even Barbie dolls. This course explores the pop sensations, market niches, and even celebrity scandals of 'Popular Islam' within the broader context of religious identity, experience, and authority in Islamic traditions. Balancing textual depth with geographic breadth, the course includes several case studies: Egypt, Indonesia, Iran, Mali, Turkey, and North America. Students will learn about how religious trends are created -- and debated -- on pop culture's public stage. We will reflect critically on both primary materials and inter-disciplinary scholarly writings about the relationships between pop culture, religious identities, devotional practices, and political projects. No pre-requisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    RELG 220, ASIA 220, ISLM 220
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  • IREL 262: Global Christianity
    This course explores the origin, development, and contemporary state of Christianity with reference to the many cultures and societies that have shaped it, the world's largest religion. We begin with the origin and early development of Christianity within the context of ancient Judaism and the Roman Empire. We consider the development of Christianity into its many contemporary forms, and focus throughout the class on how Christianity is practiced throughout the world. We pay special attention to how Christianity has developed in places unfamiliar to most Americans, such as Eastern Europe, Asia, and Africa. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    RELG 212
  • IREL 263: Global Islam
    This course explores the origin and development of the Islamic religious tradition, along with varying interpretations of Islamic law and prominent issues facing contemporary Muslims around the world. Participants in the course read classical and contemporary literature as windows into Muslim life in different cultures and historical periods, and view Islamic art and architecture as visual texts. To learn about the rich diversity within Islam, students can work with texts, rituals, poetry, music, and film from a range of cultures within the Muslim world, from the Middle East, Africa, and Asia to Europe and North America. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    RELG 213, ASIA 213, ISLM 213
  • IREL 264: Global Hinduism
    This course examines the teachings of the Hindu religious tradition as presented in the earliest writings of the tradition, as well as in dramas, epic narratives, and contemporary religious practice. In the course of the semester, we will visit Hindu Temples in the Chicago area as we explore the historical, social, and cultural context of Indian religious themes as they continue to be practiced in the 21st century. Texts range from philosophical musings about the nature of the universe to the story of a king who loses his wife to a 10-headed demon. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    RELG 214, ASIA 214
  • IREL 265: Global Buddhism
    An introduction to the origins of Buddhism in India as well as to the major cultural and historical influences on the spread of Buddhism throughout Asia, particularly in India, Sri Lanka, Myanmar, Thailand, Tibet, China, and Japan. The course will examine various forms of Buddhist practice including devotion, ethics, sangha membership, meditation, rituals, and festivals. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    RELG 215, ASIA 215
  • IREL 266: Chinese Religions
    Focusing primarily on the teachings of the Confucian (and neo-Confucian), Daoist, and early Chinese Buddhist traditions, we will explore the concepts and practices of these communities within their historical, cultural, and social contexts. Reading narrative, poetic, and classical texts in translation that present such ideas as the ethics of human-heartedness, the relativity of all things, and the importance of self-sacrifice, we will discuss what teachings these masterful texts offer 21st century questioners. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    RELG 216, ASIA 216
  • IREL 267: Religion and Politics
    This course examines the complex social, historical, and intellectual forces that impact the relationships between religion and politics. Students begin by exploring the historical genealogy of Western ideas about the proper role of religion in the public square. We draw from various theoretical approaches in order to better understand particular conflict situations such as contemporary U.S. political debates on the role of religion in policy-making; the tension between Islam and democracy in Turkey; the head scarf debate in France; and the actions of Christian and Buddhist monks during the Vietnam War. We will critically reflect on the role of religious ideologies as well as the ways in which religious explanations of politics and violence can obscure more enduring histories of power relations. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    RELG 230, POLS 230
  • IREL 268: 21st Century Islam
    The 1.5 billion Muslims around the world represent an immense diversity of languages, ethnicities, cultures, contexts and perspectives. This course focuses on 21st century issues faced by Muslims living in different cultures. Contemporary social issues are examined in light of different interpretations of Islamic practice, global communication and social networks, elements of popular culture, and the interface between religion and government. Biographies, short stories, contemporary journalism, and films that explore life in Muslim and non-Muslim countries present a nuanced portrait of contemporary Islam. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    RELG 255, ISLM 255, ASIA 255
  • IREL 271: Cultures of Modern Africa
    Introduction to contemporary rural and urban society in sub-Saharan Africa, drawing on materials from all major regions of the subcontinent. Particular emphasis will be on problems of rural development, rural-urban migration, and structural changes of economic, political, and social formations in the various new nations. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    SOAN 221, AFAM 221
  • IREL 272: History & Cultures of Latin America
    This course introduces students to modern historical, ethnohistorical, and anthropological approaches to the indigenous populations of Latin America. The course will focus on the conflict and crisis that have characterized the relationship between the native inhabitants of the New World and the Old World immigrants and their descendants whose presence has forever changed the Americas. This conflict, and the cultures that emerged from it, will be traced both historically (starting with the 'conquest') and regionally, focusing on four distinct areas: central Mexico; Guatemala and Chiapas; the Andes; and the Amazon. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    SOAN 231, LNAM 231
  • IREL 273: Cultural Ecology of Africa
    In this course, we will study the relationships between African peoples and their environments. We will consider the process of globalization and its relationship to the changing landscape of Africa in a historical context. By combining environmental studies and anthropology, we will bring a unique perspective to our study of the historical interaction of African cultures and environments, from pre-colonial times through the colonial period to the current post-colonial period. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement.)
    SOAN 273, ES 273
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  • IREL 274: Globalization of Culture & Society
    This course is an introduction to the study of contemporary diversity of human cultures. In the process of studying the peoples of the world, we will investigate various social scientific perspectives as they have developed in recent years in response to the increasing significance of globalization in local cultures. By better understanding the values and beliefs of members of other societies, we will be able to gain a more insightful understanding of our own and come to better appreciate the ways in which our own culture subtly shapes our perceptions of the world. Concepts of race, ethnicity, and identity will be considered, as well as the theme of communication across cultural boundaries. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    SOAN 250
  • IREL 275: Sociology of Terrorism
    Terrorism has been part of the Western consciousness since the rise of anarchism a century ago. Events of September 11th, 2001, brought a new urgency to the examination of the global circumstances and forces that have given rise to the present brand of transnational and global terrorism. The newest mode of this phenomenon is visible in the public propaganda of ISIL and its affiliates in West Asia and North Africa. This course concentrates on sociological perspectives regarding specific traditions that have fostered terrorist ideologies and practices. The varieties of terrorism to be examined in this course include Christian (in the United States and Europe), Islamic (Shiite or Sunni branches), Buddhist, Sikh/Hindu, and secular terrorism of the left and the right. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    SOAN 208
  • IREL 280: The Mexican-American Border
    As the only place where the third world and first world touch, the Mexican-American border is unique. This course will focus on the border and how its unique location in the world has created a culture, language, politics, religion and economy that reflect the interdependence between these two neighboring countries. The course will begin with the history of the border from the Gadsden Purchase in 1854 to the passage of NAFTA in 2004 and then examine the impact of free trade on Mexico. The course will explore how people (immigration - both legal and illegal), resources (oil, workers), consumer products (household appliances, food, music, and art), environmental waste (toxic waste, water and air pollution) and technology (outsourcing) cross borders as globalization impacts both Mexicans and Americans. The course involves a three-week stay along the border in May. Pre-requisites: ECON 110 and SPAN 112 or its equivalent. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    BUSN 280, ECON 280, LNAM 280, SPAN 201
  • IREL 282: Currents in Latin American Thought
    Taking a historical perspective, the course will examine important themes in Latin American thought such as philosophical anthropology (race, the nature of the human being, and Latin American character), the study of values (subjectivism versus objectivism), and debates about philosophy and history (universalist versus culturalist approaches, free will versus determinist outlooks). (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    PHIL 272, LNAM 272
  • IREL 283: Philosophy of Self: East and West
    The course will examine how great thinkers from East and West, ancient and modern times, have tackled the relation between reason, passion, and desire. We will study Plato's tripartite model of the soul, the Stoic monism, especially Chrysippus' theory of desire, and various Eastern concepts such as self-overcoming, unselfing, and self-forgetting. We will also include some basic readings from the scientific discussions on mirror neurons and Antonio Damasio's writings on self and emotion. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    PHIL 253, ASIA 253
  • IREL 285: Desire and Discipline: Asian Morals
    This course offers a focused historical narrative of the development of Asian moral thinking. It shows, at its early phase, how a particular moral philosopher's thinking (such as Mencius and Xun-zi) is largely determined by his thinking on human nature. However, in later periods, particularly after the importation of Buddhism, the debates on human nature are replaced by an intense cognitive and metaphysical interest in the human mind. Moral cultivation begins to focus less on following moral rules but more on cultivating the mind. The effect of this nature-mind shift on Asian moral thinking is both historically profound and theoretically surprising. Readings: Confucius, Mencius, Xun-zi, Lao zi, Zhuang zi, Zhang Zai, Chen Brothers, Zhu Xi and D. T. Suzuki. (Meets the GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    PHIL 275, ASIA 275
  • IREL 286: Social Justice and Human Rights
    Examination of the concepts and debates surrounding social justice and human rights, with attention to the arguments between East and West. Applications to current global and domestic issues, such as globalization; poverty and disparities in wealth and opportunity; race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation; political liberties; and genocide.
    PHIL 276, ETHC 276
  • IREL 287: Social Justice versus Freedom?
    Examination of the perceived tensions between efforts to promote social justice and guarantees of individual freedom. Theoretical debates will be linked to practical issues, such as promotion of free markets versus government social programs and questions of government's legitimate role on personal issues, such as providing for gay marriage. Efforts to seek common ground will be explored. No prerequisites.
    PHIL 277, ETHC 277
  • IREL 288: Topics in Japanese Thought
    The course focuses on the Japanese understanding of nature, life, and history. We will focus on the ideas of fragility, impermanence, and beauty. Students will learn the central ideas of Zen Buddhism. Topics to be covered may include artistic representations in Noh plays, Tea ceremonies, and the Samurai culture. Prerequisite: any course in Asian thought or permission of the instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement).
    PHIL 285, ASIA 285
  • IREL 297: Troubled World Geography
    Human catastrophes and environmental catastrophes are usually deeply interlinked. War, disease, slavery, earthquakes, tsunamis, climate instability, desertification, and deforestation have geographical correlates that we must recognize to understand their causes, consequences, and solutions. This course provides geographic literacy for understanding the political and environmental issues of the 21st century, issues based in geography - based, that is, in the spatial distribution of land, water, languages, and economic activity. We focus on the history of the world's hotspots by examining their climates, topographies, and proximities to politically and environmentally unstable places on the globe. This course examines theories of the relationship of human cultures to geography and suggests ways to recast such theories into modern forms. The troubled spots of the world that we examine include the Middle East, all of Africa, Indonesia, and much of the Americas. The relationship between human cultures and geography is present in all of our investigations. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ES 217
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  • IREL 310: Emerging Markets Analysis
    Analysis of emerging markets of East Asia and Latin America, paying particular attention to growth strategies and the impact of market reforms, financial markets development, and foreign capital flows on economic performance of these countries. The course relies on case studies from Asian countries of China, South Korea, Thailand, Singapore, and Hong Kong and Latin American economies of Brazil, Argentina, Mexico, and Chile. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.) Prerequisite: ECON 220.
    BUSN 322, ASIA 322, LNAM 322
  • IREL 311: Global Cultures & Intnl Bus-Chgo
    (Global Cultures and International Business Activities of Chicago) As influences of global activities increase locally, Chicago provides vast resources for the study of cultures, economic policies, political relations, and global business strategies. More than 130 consulates and foreign trade offices, and headquarters of many global companies, are in Chicago. This course will address the development and implications of various cultures in relation to local and global business activities. An emphasis will be field research, visits, and other activities involving Chicago-area resources. Instructional activities will include team projects, interviews, and observations to address issues related to Chicago's role in international trade and economic development for emerging markets. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.) Prerequisite: Junior standing, or permission of instructor.
    BUSN 341
  • IREL 312: African Culture & Business Develop
    (African Culture and Business Development.) While globalization can potentially enhance economic development and improve the quality of life, many nations, especially those in Africa, do not receive these benefits. Course emphasis will be on an analysis of efforts by businesses, community organizations, and government agencies to serve African societies plagued by poverty and other social concerns. Instructional resources will include: readings from sources with varied points of view; speakers representing countries and cultural groups; and field research visits to cultural exhibits and retail enterprises. Instructional experiences will include: (1) interviews with people familiar with various African cultures and business activities; (2) student team projects to analyze global cases for improvement of food production, water purification, health delivery, telecommunications, and educational programs and; (3) promotional activities to expand awareness of efforts to enhance economic development and quality of life in Africa. Prerequisite: Junior standing, or permission of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    BUSN 342
  • IREL 316: Social Entrepreneurship
    Social entrepreneurship is a cross-cultural and interdisciplinary practice that combines traditional business and finance principles with expertise from fields as diverse as agriculture, medicine, law, engineering, environmental studies and sociology. The efforts of social entrepreneurs attempt to address problems such as poverty, hunger, disease, pollution, illiteracy, and inadequate housing in developing areas of Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The result of these efforts is often a new business model for improved economic development and enhanced quality of life in a particular cultural setting. Strategic partnerships contribute to the success of such social enterprises through connections with government, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), relief agencies, microfinance institutions, and human rights groups in varied cultural settings. This course prepares students for a changing business environment through cross-cultural and interdisciplinary assignments including field interviews, team projects, and student-created videos. Prerequisite: FIN 210. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    BUSN 360, ENTP 360
  • IREL 318: Economics of Development
    Studies the problem of sustaining accelerated economic growth in less-developed countries. This course emphasizes the issues of growth; poverty and inequality; how land labor and credit affect economic development; problems of capital formation, economic planning and international specialization and trade; and the interaction of industrialization, agricultural development, and population change. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.) Prerequisite: ECON 210.
    ECON 381
  • IREL 322: Education in Developing Countries
    (Education and Development in Developing Countries) This course explores the historical background, philosophical foundations and major themes in the education of 'developing countries' within the broader context of global development and social change. The specific goal of this course is to familiarize students with the evolution of and critical issues in formal education in most low income, less industrialized nations. Students will be able to explore contemporary themes in education from a historical and comparative perspective. Additionally, they will expand their conceptual schema for rethinking educational issues within and beyond their own societies. Geographically, this course covers countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America, but runs comparisons with countries in Europe and North America when theoretically relevant. Reading materials build on development studies and several disciplines in the social sciences and humanities such as history, philosophy, anthropology, sociology and education. Not open to first year students. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    EDUC 322, SOAN 343
  • IREL 327: The Russian Revolution
    This course provides a close study of the causes, processes and results of the Russian Revolution. Topics to be considered include: the broad historical background needed to understand the Russian revolutions of the 20th century; the causes and results of the 1905 Revolution; the impact of World War I; a close look at both the February and October revolutions of 1917; the creation of the new Soviet regime and the Civil War that shaped it; the ambiguous era of the 1920s; Stalin's 'Second Revolution' and the era of the Five Year Plans and collectivization of agriculture; the bloodletting of the Great Purges of the 1930s. Prerequisite: History 209 or 255 or permission of the instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    HIST 337
  • IREL 330: Topics in East Asian History

    HIST 340, ASIA 307
  • IREL 331: 20th Cent British Culture
    (20th Century British Culture) British culture since 1900. Topics include the impact of World War I; the Bloomsbury circle; documentary writing and film; working-class realism in the 1950s; youth culture; the New Left; postimperial culture; and postmodernism.
    HIST 335
  • IREL 332: Problems Modern Chinese Hist: Film
    (Problems in Modern Chinese History: Film) What are the enduring problems of modern China? How have different Chinese governments confronted them? We will study twentieth-century transformations in Chinese society, politics, and culture on the mainland and Taiwan in the light of modern Chinese and international history through film and discussion of the major issues addressed by Western scholarship. Basic topics to be covered include Sino-Western relations; tradition and modernization; peasant rebellions; revolution and reforms; religion; culture and society; modern science; and intellectuals and the state. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    HIST 342, ASIA 309
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  • IREL 333: Doing Business in/with China
    This course is aimed at students who are interested in a career involving business in China, who plan to apply to business school, or who are interested in Chinese business history. The course offers a theoretical framework for understanding Chinese business, commercial culture, and entrepreneurship patterns, as well as a practical guide to business practices, market conditions, negotiation techniques, and relevant organizations and networks in China. The course utilizes an interdisciplinary approach to examine China's business history, focusing on three separate but interrelated themes: America's "China Dream" in the past; doing business in China in the 21st century; and the "Panda Huggers' dilemma" in the future. The ultimate goal of the course is to equip students who are interested in doing business in or with China with the background knowledge and analytical skills to aid future careers and business endeavors. The course is open to all majors in the College with no prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    HIST 341
  • IREL 342: International Political Economy
    The course introduces students to the academic discipline of International Political Economy (IPE). It surveys the intellectual history of the discipline and specifies the main methodological and theoretical debates in IPE. The course also examines international trade and production, the international monetary and financial systems, and global poverty and development. Prerequisite: Politics 110 or consent of instructor.
    POLS 342
  • IREL 346: International Humanitarian Law
    This course explores the development and operation of international humanitarian law, the body of international law that seeks to limit the effects of armed conflict by regulating the means and methods of warfare and by protecting persons not participating in the hostilities. We will discuss key doctrinal features of international humanitarian law--including, e.g., proportionality, military necessity, and the distinction between civilian objects and military objectives--as well as key sources of international humanitarian law, including, e.g., the Conventions of The Hague and Geneva (and their progeny). We will examine the difference between international and non-international armed conflicts, and we will also consider the relationship between international humanitarian law and other areas of international law, such as international human rights law and international criminal law. Prerequisite: POLS 110 or consent of instructor
    POLS 346
  • IREL 347: International Institutions
    In this course students survey the theories of international institutions, focusing on how they emerge and function, as well as their effect on international relations processes and outcomes. Also central to the course are in-depth case studies of international organizations in the fields of diplomacy, security, economics, environment, law, and humanitarian affairs. Special emphasis is placed on the United Nations system and the European Union. Prerequisite: Politics 110 or consent of instructor.
    POLS 347
  • IREL 348: International Law
    Students in this course investigate the evolution of modern international law. We consider the roles of states, the United Nations, and non-state actors in international law, mechanisms for the creation and enforcement of international legal norms, the changing nature of state sovereignty from the Peace of Westphalia to the present, and breaches of international law and potential consequences. Attention is also given to pressing matters of international concern, including war and terrorism, environmental issues, and human rights and humanitarian law. Prerequisite: POLS 110 or consent of instructor.
    POLS 348
  • IREL 349: Topics: U.S. Presidents & Jerusalem
    Until 1967, the U.S. accepted the international consensus on the issue of Jerusalem, which called for the internationalization of the city according to General Assembly Resolution 181. Also, the U.S. refused to recognize both Israel's annexation of West Jerusalem and Jordan's annexation of East Jerusalem. After the 1967 War, Israel extended its control to Arab East Jerusalem and later declared all Jerusalem its eternal capital. Since then, American presidents have stopped short of pressuring Israel to abide by Resolution 181, arguing instead that the future of Jerusalem should be negotiated between Israel and the Palestinians. This course studies the complex history of the positions of modern American presidents on Jerusalem, focusing on how American domestic politics has shaped U.S. policy and the interactions between U.S. presidential administrations and international actors on the status of Jerusalem.
    ISLM 349
  • IREL 350: State and Nation-Building
    This seminar focuses on the nature, dynamics, and strategies of state and nation-building processes within the modern international state system. Students will examine the mechanisms utilized to forge and facilitate national consciousness among the fragile, developing post-colonial states of Africa and other Third World countries. Dominant theoretical paradigms and empirical case studies that focus on the salient differences among nation-states, nations in search of states, and states in search of nations will be discussed. Other subjects include the role and relevance of nationalist ideology in our modern world and the causes, mechanisms, and consequences of ethnic conflicts and separatist movements in both developing countries and advanced industrialized states. Prerequisite: POLS 110 or consent of instructor.
  • IREL 351: Political Systems: Islamic World
    About one in four countries have Muslim-majority populations. This course examines the political systems of the Islamic world, which spans the globe from Europe and Africa to Southeast Asia. Students learn about the variety of regime types among these countries, including absolute and constitutional monarchies, one-party republics, theocracies, and Islamic and liberal democracies. Particular attention is given to the role of religion, culture, economic development, and history in the formation and operation of the political orders of these countries. Prerequisite: POLS 110 or consent of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement.)
    POLS 311, ISLM 312
  • IREL 352: Islam, State, and Society
    This course examines Islamic theology's guidance for governance and society. Students will evaluate the sources of the religion as well as early Islamic history to better understand the role of religion in the state, society, and family. Students will critically evaluate conventionally held views regarding Islam and Muslims and the treatment of women and minorities according to Islamic sources. Prerequisite: POLS 110. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    POLS 314, ISLM 314
  • IREL 353: Comparative Foreign Policy
    Though varied, the foreign policies of countries exhibit similar patterns, as well as analogous restraints and opportunities. Through a comparative analysis, this course surveys case studies of the contemporary foreign policies of great powers (Britain, China, France, Germany, Japan, and Russia) and regional powers (Brazil, India, Iran, South Africa, and Turkey). It analyzes how foreign policy interests are formulated, utilizing a variety of theories that highlight the importance of domestic and international influences on a country's foreign policy choices and behavior. Prerequisite: Politics 110 or consent of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement.)
    POLS 315
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  • IREL 355: Dictators, Despots, and Tyrants
    This course is an examination of the ideological underpinnings of modern dictatorships, their politics, and how they organize the institutions of the state. It begins with an examination of twentieth century dictatorships, including Nazi Germany, Fascist Italy, Imperial Japan, the Soviet Union, and Communist China. It then considers contemporary dictatorships in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East. Students are introduced to source materials including pamphlets authored by dictators and a variety of films from different genres. The course underscores the political commonalities and differences among dictatorial regimes over time and across regions. It also explores how modern-day dictatorships and their leaders have shown remarkable resilience against the forces of globalization and political liberalization. Prerequisite: POLS 110 or consent of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    POLS 355
  • IREL 357: Global Democratization
    This course is a thematic and historical study of recent transitions from authoritarian rule to democracy. Students discuss theories of democratization and democratic consolidation, examine the key features of different 'waves' of democratization, and consider how new democracies avoid 'backsliding' to authoritarianism. Students also explore the relationship between democratic systems of government and culture. Prerequisite: POLS 110 or consent of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    POLS 317
  • IREL 360: Religion in Global Context
    Using a religious studies methodology, this course examines the nature of religious experience as expressed by different religious communities and cultures from ancient periods into the present. Members of the class choose individual research topics that might focus on religious artifacts, rituals, social movements, communities, and the ways that religious ideas influence societies. Case studies are diverse, representing many religious traditions, and may include descriptions of Vietnamese Buddhists negotiating religion in a non-religious state, American Christians walking the Camino de Santiago de Compostela, Jews making a living in World War II Shanghai, Hindus building Vaishnava temples in Chicago, or Indonesian designers setting 21st century high fashion trends for contemporary Muslims. This seminar is designed for religion majors and minors, but also welcomes students in other majors with appropriate preparation. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    RELG 300
  • IREL 372: Sociology of Islam
    This course uses the discipline of historical sociology to explore the origins of Islam and the reasons it took the shape it did during its formative years in mid seventh century. It will continue to trace the development of Islam in a variety of different cultural environment. Finally we will deal with the encounter of Islam and the modern world and the formation of fundamentalism, national Islamism and the secular, reform tendencies in that religion. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    SOAN 322, ISLM 322
  • IREL 373: Globalization, Modernity, Culture
    Do we live in a 'global village'? Do we have a global culture? Is the world becoming a more homogeneous place or a more heterogeneous one? Is globalization inevitable? What are the threats and benefits of 'global society'? How has the structure of capitalism influenced globalization? This course considers the various scholarly perspectives on these issues, as well as the social actors and institutions that have promoted, benefited from, and challenged globalization. Course materials will be taken from scholarship in sociology and anthropology. Prerequisite: Sociology and Anthropology 110 or by permission. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    SOAN 363
  • IREL 374: War and Conflict
    At any given moment, a significant portion of the world's population is dealing with the effects of war. When does a state of war produce its own structures and rules? How do different societies respond in different ways to life during wartime? How does ethnic and class conflict manifest in war? What happens when war and conflict become normalized? Does the perpetual conflict between tribes in Papua New Guinea constitute war in the same way that the war on terror is a war, and are either of these the same as World War II? Does the Arab Spring constitute a state of war? This course takes up the question of the social effects of war, including the consequences of living 'on war footing.' Potential topics include the militarization of societies, the differences between state and non-state control of violence, and the mechanisms by which populations are mobilized to violence. Prerequisites: SOAN 110 and SOAN 210 or 220, or consent of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement.)
    SOAN 354
  • IREL 375: Sociology of Religion
    This seminar starts with major classical theories of sociology of religion including those of secularization and privatization of religion in the modern world. Then we shall examine the relevant events of the past quarter of the century, namely the sudden explosion of politicized and highly public religions in the Western and the non-Western worlds. The existing sociological literature didn't anticipate the current significance of religion and this tension is expected to generate interesting debates in this seminar. Special attention will be given to a comparative study of public religions in Western countries (e.g., Brazil, Poland, Spain, and the United States) and in the Middle East (Egypt, Iran, Saudi Arabia). (Meets the GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    SOAN 390, RELG 390
  • IREL 385: Comparative Philosophy: East & West
    Comparative investigation of Eastern and Western philosophical sources; elucidation and critical examination of fundamental presuppositions, unique conceptual formulations, and alternative approaches to general philosophical issues. Prerequisite: One Western philosophy course and one Asian area course, or consent of the instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    PHIL 305, ASIA 305
  • IREL 388: Comparative and International Educ
    (Comparative and International Education: Education as the Practice of Freedom) This course examines both the study and practice of comparative and international education. The course is organized with a multidisciplinary perspective with analysis of history, theory, methods, and issues in comparative and international education. A major goal of the course is to interrogate the linkages between education and society. Recurrent themes will be examined to demonstrate how every educational system not only arises from but also shapes its particular socio-cultural context. Students will have the opportunity to deepen and expand their knowledge of educational issues within a global context. Not open to first year students. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    EDUC 320, ETHC 330, SOAN 344
  • IREL 480: The 21st Century World (Dis)Order
    (Senior Seminar in International Relations: The 21st Century World (Dis)order) The international system of states is undergoing a power shift. Though it will remain the dominant world power for some time to come, most scholars agree that American global preeminence is waning. Yet scholars disagree about the effect of this shift on world order. Some see an effort by the United States and its closest allies to prop-up the current American liberal world order of global economic integration and cooperative security. Others envision either a 'post-American' world in which the United States and rising great powers re-negotiate the ground rules of a new liberal order, or a world in which the United States is one of a small number of great powers competing for power and influence in an illiberal world. Each of these possibilities raises compelling questions about war and peace, and cooperation and discord in twenty-first century international politics. Will this power shift jeopardize the liberal world order? Can this world order persist in the absence of American preeminence? How might the United States and its allies extend the current American world order?
    AMER 478
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  • IREL 481: Security & Insecurity
    (Senior Seminar in International Relations: Security and Insecurity). Security studies in a mainstay of international relations scholarship and, like the international relations discipline itself, security studies has evolved and changed over the years. Drawing from theories of international relations, this senior seminar is an inquiry into the meanings of security (and insecurity). It underscores the wide variations in the application of the term to the objects of research, including the state (national security), the system of states (international security), the world beyond national borders (global security), and people and communities (human security). It applies these formations of security to a variety of issue areas in international relations today, both traditional (military affairs and economic affairs) and non-traditional (humanitarian and environmental affairs), thereby exposing students to an array of understandings and approaches to security studies in contemporary theory and practice. Students use their acquired knowledge to research and analyze a contemporary security issue or set of related issues. Prerequisite: Open to international relations and politics juniors and seniors only.

  • IREL 482: Democracy and the Middle East
    (Senior Seminar in International Relations: Theories of Democracy and the Middle East) In this seminar students examine and apply theories of democracy to the contemporary Middle East and North Africa (MENA). Students learn the roles that different factors play in determining outcomes such as democracy, women's rights, and rights of minorities. Among other explanations of democracy, students will learn about modernization theory, the resource curse, and the role of religion. Students will evaluate these explanations as they apply to the MENA, considering their strengths and weaknesses. By the end of the course, students should have a comprehensive understanding of the deterrents to democratization in the MENA and possible factors that could facilitate reform. Prerequisite: Open to senior IR majors and Politics majors (in the Global Politics track), or permission of instructor.

 

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  • ISLM 110: Beginning Arabic I
    Students will learn to read, write and understand Modern Standard Literary Arabic, and to use the language in basic conversation, including exchanging courtesies, meeting people, asking questions and providing information. No prerequisite.
    ARBC 110
  • ISLM 112: Beginning Arabic II
    Students will continue to learn to read, write and speak basic Modern Standard Literary Arabic in a variety of cultural situations. Prerequisite: ARBC 110 or equivalent.
    ARBC 112
  • ISLM 213: Global Islam
    This course explores the origin and development of the Islamic religious tradition, along with varying interpretations of Islamic law and prominent issues facing contemporary Muslims around the world. Participants in the course read classical and contemporary literature as windows into Muslim life in different cultures and historical periods, and view Islamic art and architecture as visual texts. To learn about the rich diversity within Islam, students can work with texts, rituals, poetry, music, and film from a range of cultures within the Muslim world, from the Middle East, Africa, and Asia to Europe and North America. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    RELG 213, ASIA 213, IREL 263
  • ISLM 216: Politics of Middle East
    Study will focus on issues of modernization; the nature of Middle East governments; the past and present impact of religion on the region's culture and socio-political system; the Arab-Israeli conflict and its implications for world peace; and the impact of oil on the economy and regime stability in the Persian Gulf region. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    POLS 216, IREL 256
  • ISLM 217: Ottoman Empire
    This course examines the political, economic, and social dimensions of the Ottoman Empire from the 14th to the early 20th centuries. We will explore the global context in which the Ottoman Empire arose and the nature of the relationship between the Ottoman Empire and Europe. The course will also examine the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire in the context of the emergence of the modern Middle East. No prerequisite. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • ISLM 220: Islam and Pop Culture
    In recent decades the global Islamic revival has produced a new generation of Muslim film stars and fashion models, Sufi self-help gurus, Muslim comic book heroes, romance novel writers, calligraphy artists, and even Barbie dolls. This course explores the pop sensations, market niches, and even celebrity scandals of 'Popular Islam' within the broader context of religious identity, experience, and authority in Islamic traditions. Balancing textual depth with geographic breadth, the course includes several case studies: Egypt, Indonesia, Iran, Mali, Turkey, and North America. Students will learn about how religious trends are created -- and debated -- on pop culture's public stage. We will reflect critically on both primary materials and inter-disciplinary scholarly writings about the relationships between pop culture, religious identities, devotional practices, and political projects. No pre-requisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    RELG 220, ASIA 220, IREL 260
  • ISLM 243: Crusade & Holy War in Med Europe
    (Crusade and Holy War in Medieval Europe) Medieval Europe experienced widespread debate about the use of violence by Christians. The course considers early definitions of Just War and the attempts by the church to control violence around the year 1000. Detailed examination of the origin of the idea of crusade and the history of the First Crusade (1095-99) from Christian, Jewish, Greek, and Muslim perspectives. Examines the later medieval phenomenon of crusade against other Christians.
    HIST 243, RELG 248
  • ISLM 255: 21st Century Islam
    The 1.5 billion Muslims around the world represent an immense diversity of languages, ethnicities, cultures, contexts and perspectives. This course focuses on 21st century issues faced by Muslims living in different cultures. Contemporary social issues are examined in light of different interpretations of Islamic practice, global communication and social networks, elements of popular culture, and the interface between religion and government. Biographies, short stories, contemporary journalism, and films that explore life in Muslim and non-Muslim countries present a nuanced portrait of contemporary Islam. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    RELG 255, ASIA 255, IREL 268
  • ISLM 282: Depicting Difference in Western Art
    (Depicting Difference: Images of the Racial and Religious 'Other' in Western Art.) This course will examine how Western cultures visually depicted those they considered different from themselves?those they considered to be 'Other.' We shall investigate European traditions of depicting difference, beginning with Classical Greece and Rome's conceptions of the monstrous races and continuing through to contemporary artistic challenges to stereotypical representations of otherness. While our explorations will range from the Ancient to the Modern world, our course will be particularly focused on the role visual imagery of the 'Other' played in supporting colonialism and Western discourses of cultural superiority in the fifteenth through nineteenth centuries. As this course is focused on how Western cultures depicted those of different racial, religious and cultural backgrounds, it will undoubtedly foster critical analysis and understanding of different races, religions and cultures. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ARTH 282
  • ISLM 286: Topics in Islamic Art
    This course examines the visual arts of early and medieval Islam from the seventh through the thirteenth centuries in Muslim territories, ranging from Central Asia to Spain. Through an examination of diverse media, we shall explore the role of visual arts played in the formation and expression of Islamic cultural identity. Topics will include the uses of figural and non-figural imagery, religious and secular art, public and private art and the status, function, and meaning of the portable luxury objects. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ARTH 286, RELG 286
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  • ISLM 310: Islamic Mysticism
    Muslim saints and seekers have performed mystical practices for more than 1300 years in areas stretching from Europe and North Africa to Turkey, Iran, and the Indian subcontinent. Contemporary holy men and holy women continue to teach such mystical practices as the dancing and whirling of dervishes, the up-tempo singing of qawwals in India and Pakistan, and the rhythmic chanting of Arabic verses in Egypt. In this course, we will explore the religious thinking of these holy men and women through their writing, art, and music. Texts will include novels, short stories, allegorical tales, biographies, and films. No prerequisite. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    RELG 310, ASIA 310
  • ISLM 312: Political Systems: Islamic World
    About one in four countries have Muslim-majority populations. This course examines the political systems of the Islamic world, which spans the globe from Europe and Africa to Southeast Asia. Students learn about the variety of regime types among these countries, including absolute and constitutional monarchies, one-party republics, theocracies, and Islamic and liberal democracies. Particular attention is given to the role of religion, culture, economic development, and history in the formation and operation of the political orders of these countries. Prerequisite: POLS 110 or consent of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement.)
    POLS 311, IREL 351
  • ISLM 313: Political Islam
    This course examines the interaction of Islam and politics. It begins with an examination of the relationship between Islam and politics in the early history of the Islamic state. It then studies the ways in which Islam is incorporated into Muslim countries today and the various models of contemporary Islam-state relations. The course also examines Islamist movements and parties, and their role in the domestic politics of Muslim countries, including the period of the Arab Spring. Prerequisite: Politics 110 or consent of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement.)
    POLS 313
  • ISLM 314: Islam, State, and Society
    This course examines Islamic theology's guidance for governance and society. Students will evaluate the sources of the religion as well as early Islamic history to better understand the role of religion in the state, society, and family. Students will critically evaluate conventionally held views regarding Islam and Muslims and the treatment of women and minorities according to Islamic sources. Prerequisite: POLS 110. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    POLS 314, IREL 352
  • ISLM 322: Sociology of Islam
    This course uses the discipline of historical sociology to explore the origins of Islam and the reasons it took the shape it did during its formative years in mid seventh century. It will continue to trace the development of Islam in a variety of different cultural environment. Finally we will deal with the encounter of Islam and the modern world and the formation of fundamentalism, national Islamism and the secular, reform tendencies in that religion. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    SOAN 322, IREL 372
  • ISLM 328: Contemporary France
    This course will address current subjects of debate in France and study how France has changed (politically and socially) since its major period of decolonization in the 1950s-60s. Particular attention will be given to France's efforts to integrate immigrants, and specific issues related to French residents of Muslim heritage. Through the reading and discussion of literature and critical essays, as well as viewing current films and internet/satellite news broadcasts, students will gain greater understanding of France's changing identity. Oral and written competence will be enhanced by discussion, debate, presentation, and writing short papers in French. Prerequisite: FREN 212 or equivalent. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    FREN 328
  • ISLM 330: The French-Speaking World
    This course will familiarize students with the history, politics and contemporary culture of various areas of the French-speaking world (such as in Canada, Africa, the Middle East and Western Europe); particular attention will be paid to areas of the French-speaking Islamic World. Topics will vary, and may include discussion of immigration, women's issues, political conflict, changing social and national identity. The course will draw from film, literature, critical materials and contemporary news sources. Prerequisite: French 212 or equivalent. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement.)
    FREN 330
  • ISLM 349: Topics: U.S. Presidents & Jerusalem
    Until 1967, the U.S. accepted the international consensus on the issue of Jerusalem, which called for the internationalization of the city according to General Assembly Resolution 181. Also, the U.S. refused to recognize both Israel's annexation of West Jerusalem and Jordan's annexation of East Jerusalem. After the 1967 War, Israel extended its control to Arab East Jerusalem and later declared all Jerusalem its eternal capital. Since then, American presidents have stopped short of pressuring Israel to abide by Resolution 181, arguing instead that the future of Jerusalem should be negotiated between Israel and the Palestinians. This course studies the complex history of the positions of modern American presidents on Jerusalem, focusing on how American domestic politics has shaped U.S. policy and the interactions between U.S. presidential administrations and international actors on the status of Jerusalem.
    IREL 349

 

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  • ITAL 120: Parliamo Italiano: Ital Converstn
    Designed for students with minimal (one year) or no previous knowledge of Italian. In this intensive three-week course, we will strive to maximize your oral proficiency using a 'full immersion' approach, including drills of model sentences and word patterns. We will focus on the acquisition of basic verbal communication skills (i.e., oral fluency, correct pronunciation, listening comprehension) and on cultural aspects that will promote understanding and appreciation of Italian culture. (Taught only in the summer).

 

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  • JAPN 110: Beginning Japanese I
    An introduction to the form of spoken Japanese along with Japanese customs and culture.Most of the fundamental structures are covered in Japanese 110 and 112, together with writing practice in the hiragana and the katakana syllabaries. 112 is a continuation of 110. Lab work is an integral part of the sequence. No prerequisites.
    ASIA 111
  • JAPN 112: Beginning Japanese II
    An introduction to the form of spoken Japanese along with Japanese customs and culture. Most of the fundamental structures are covered in Japanese 110 and 112, together with writing practice in the hiragana and the katakana syllabaries and some basic kanji. 112 is a continuation of 110. Lab work is an integral part of the sequence. Prerequisite: Japanese 110 or equivalent.
    ASIA 113
  • JAPN 210: Intermediate Japanese
    This course will continue the fundamentals of Japanese conversation begun in the first-year series, Japanese 110 and 112, and continue work on reading and writing the language. Extensive oral practice and conversation exercises are stressed. Classes will be supplemented with work in the language laboratory and daily written work. Prerequisite: Japanese 112 or consent of instructor.
    ASIA 211
  • JAPN 212: Advanced Intermediate Japanese
    A continuation of the Japanese language fundamentals begun in Japanese 110, 112, and 210. Extensive practice in oral expression and increasingly stronger emphasis on reading and writing, with an extensive use of audio and video materials. Prerequisite: Japanese 210 or consent of the instructor.
    ASIA 219

 

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  • JOUR 120: Introduction to Journalism
    Introduction to Journalism presents students with the skills and information that are essential for reliable, accurate, and independent news reporting. This course addresses the fundamental skills associated with journalistic writing, and presents students with the essential issues facing journalism today. In addition to writing, this course addresses the laws, ethics, and fundamentals of news literacy, with a keen focus on the critical thinking skills required for news judgment.
  • JOUR 200: Journalism Practicum: The Stentor
    This practicum gives students an opportunity to earn Lake Forest College credit by working for the campus newspaper: The Stentor. Students who enroll in this course will work for the Stentor as editors, reporters, or columnists (or other jobs suggested by the Stentor advisor). The course will be graded on a CR/D/F basis only. Students will qualify for credit in this course if they complete 40 hours of work per semester. JOUR 200 counts for .25 credits per semester of enrollment. The course is overseen by the faculty advisor for The Stentor, who will arrange for grade/credit assignments in consultation with the chair of the Communication Department. Only one full credit (four semesters of JOUR 200) may be counted toward Lake Forest College graduation. No prerequisites.
  • JOUR 320: Advanced Journalism
    Though we have recently seen dramatic changes in how news consumers receive their news, what has not changed is the need for solid reporting and writing skills. This course gives students the opportunity to learn the intricacies of specific types of journalistic writing, including news, feature, sport, investigative/in-depth, opinion and review writing. Advanced Journalism also introduces students to techniques relating to journalistic style and editing. Using the fundamentals taught in Introduction to Journalism (Communication 120), students in Advanced Journalism write stories and opinion pieces to be used in the editorial production of student media at Lake Forest College. Prerequisite: JOUR 120 or COMM 120.

 

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  • LNAM 202: Chicago: Local and Global
    Chicago is a global and a 'local' city. On the one hand, the city is involved in manufacturing, trade, and services on a worldwide basis. On the other hand, Chicago is a city of neighborhoods, often based on strong ethnic and racial identities. The course examines the city's dual quality by studying the interconnections between the world economy and the daily life of Chicagoans. A key connection is immigration, which we shall explore from the standpoint of several important communities, including, most prominently, Hispanics/Latinos, as well as African-Americans, Eastern Europeans, and Asians. The course will take both an historical and contemporary approach, as we analyze how the city developed economically, politically, and culturally since the late 19th century, as well as how the city is adjusting today in an age of globalization. No prerequisites. Cross-listed in Politics and American Studies, and serves as an elective for Urban Studies. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    POLS 239, AMER 226
  • LNAM 219: Politics of Latin America
    An introduction to politics and social change in Latin America. Study will focus on several Latin American countries and on special topics such as human rights, religion, the military, land reform, women, and population policy. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    POLS 219, IREL 259
  • LNAM 226: Colonial Latin American Art
    This course will consider the arts of Central and South America from the conquest to independence (ca. 1500-1850) and will explore the intersections among art, culture, and power in the specific conditions of Colonial Latin America. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement).
    ARTH 226
  • LNAM 236: Latin American Film
    Taught in English. An interdisciplinary study of Latin American film, from multiple perspectives: artistic, historical, political, and socio-economic. This course will highlight the artistic achievements of Latin American filmmakers from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico. We will use selected readings from original works for films that are based on fiction. A number of films have been Academy Award nominees or winners. Further readings will include a history of Latin American cinema, movie reviews, and interviews with directors. The course will scrutinize the links among cultural phenomena, socio-political events, and the art of filmmaking. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    SPAN 236, CINE 236
  • LNAM 245: Child Labor in Latin America
    Explores the role of child labor in the economies of developing Latin American countries, focusing on the question 'Do countries need to use child labor to industrialize?' Historically, industrialized countries have relied heavily on children to work in factories and mines. Today it appears history is repeating itself as developing countries utilize children in the informal sectors. The employment of children in Brazil, Colombia, Peru, Chile, and Argentina will be examined in detail. The economic, political, social/cultural, and technological explanations for child labor will be explored for each country. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.) Prerequisite: ECON 110.
    ECON 245, IREL 215
  • LNAM 257: History of Mexico
    This course broadly surveys Mexican history from the pre-Conquest period to the Chiapas revolt in 1994. The meaning of progress, the sacred and indigenous culture, imperialism's impact, and popular mobilization are among its recurring themes. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    HIST 272, IREL 228
  • LNAM 270: Latin American History
    This course will introduce students to major transformations in Latin American history from the Pre-Columbian era to the present, including in Mexico, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean. We will examine the social, political, and economic institutions that shaped the colonial system; we will then study how a diverse set of actors created independent nations in the early nineteenth century. We will conclude by exploring the important influence exerted by the United States as these new Latin American nations consolidated their cultural identity, forms of government, and territorial borders.
    HIST 270, IREL 227
  • LNAM 272: Currents in Latin American Thought
    Taking a historical perspective, the course will examine important themes in Latin American thought such as philosophical anthropology (race, the nature of the human being, and Latin American character), the study of values (subjectivism versus objectivism), and debates about philosophy and history (universalist versus culturalist approaches, free will versus determinist outlooks). (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    PHIL 272, IREL 282
  • LNAM 280: The Mexican-American Border
    As the only place where the third world and first world touch, the Mexican-American border is unique. This course will focus on the border and how its unique location in the world has created a culture, language, politics, religion and economy that reflect the interdependence between these two neighboring countries. The course will begin with the history of the border from the Gadsden Purchase in 1854 to the passage of NAFTA in 2004 and then examine the impact of free trade on Mexico. The course will explore how people (immigration - both legal and illegal), resources (oil, workers), consumer products (household appliances, food, music, and art), environmental waste (toxic waste, water and air pollution) and technology (outsourcing) cross borders as globalization impacts both Mexicans and Americans. The course involves a three-week stay along the border in May. Pre-requisites: ECON 110 and SPAN 112 or its equivalent. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    IREL 280, BUSN 280, ECON 280, SPAN 201
  • LNAM 302: The Latin American World
    Taught in English. A study of native peoples of the American Indian civilizations from multiple perspectives: historical, political, sociological, and literary. Course materials include readings and lectures on a wide variety of topics, discussions, films, videos, slides, and music. Students with a knowledge of Spanish and/or Portuguese may work with bilingual materials. May count toward the Spanish major. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    SPAN 337
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  • LNAM 304: Cocina y Cultura y Literatura
    Cocina y cultura y literatura (Cuisine, Culture and Literature) is an immersion type course in which students read fiction and poetry about food. They research and debate ethical and social issues, such as genetic modification of plants, food distribution, hunger, malnutrition, obesity, and anorexia. The students will be responsible for preparing authentic dishes and explaining their cultural significance to the class. Excursions might include visits to a local Hispanic market, a Spanish-speaking soup kitchen, ethnic restaurants, or homes of native Spanish speakers. Prerequisite: Spanish 212. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    SPAN 304
  • LNAM 306: Intro Latin American Culture
    This course will be taught in Spanish. It is designed to provide an introductory overview of Latin America's development focusing on its cultural manifestations through time. Films, music, and art will supplement readings for a better understanding of the cultural heterogeneity of Latin America, its past, and its present reality. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    SPAN 306
  • LNAM 319: Continuing Portuguese
    The course will continue the study of the Portuguese of Brazil, begun in Spanish 317, Spanish for Portuguese Speakers. The course will strengthen the basic skills of reading, writing, understanding, and speaking Portuguese and will include many aspects of Brazilian culture: music, films, magazines, current events, and literature. Prerequisite: Spanish 317 or other immersion experience in Portuguese. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)(Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    SPAN 319
  • LNAM 322: Emerging Markets Analysis
    Analysis of emerging markets of East Asia and Latin America, paying particular attention to growth strategies and the impact of market reforms, financial markets development, and foreign capital flows on economic performance of these countries. The course relies on case studies from Asian countries of China, South Korea, Thailand, Singapore, and Hong Kong and Latin American economies of Brazil, Argentina, Mexico, and Chile. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.) Prerequisite: ECON 220.
    BUSN 322, ASIA 322, IREL 310
  • LNAM 325: U.S. Latino Literature
    This course is taught in Spanish. It is designed to familiarize students with the cultural phenomena produced in the United States by the presence of two major Hispanic groups: Mexican Americans (20.6 million) and Puerto Ricans (3.4 million). The course will examine the historical, political, and cultural development of the Mexican American/Chicano and the Puerto Rican/Boricua Hispanic heritage. The main objective is to provide the students with an overall social and literary understanding and to recognize the cultural contribution made by these two important Hispanic groups. Topics such as neo-colonialism, popular culture, national identity, gender representation in art and literature, religious syncretism, and economic impact on the workforce will be explored. Literary texts by outstanding Chicano and Boricua authors will be included. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    SPAN 325
  • LNAM 333: Cine e Historia en América Latina
    The course examines the ways that movies view historical events and periods, while at the same time shaping public perception of those events and periods in Latin America. Examples of topics are the Conquest of the Americas, the legacy of Peron, the Castro and post-Castro eras in Cuba, the Catholic Church in Mexico, dictatorship and democracy in Brazil and Chile, and narco-trafficking. The basic format will be discussion with occasional interactive lectures. Readings will include essays on cinema and history. Students will view films mostly in DVD format from several countries. Assignments will include short essays, oral presentations, and a midterm and a final exam. (Counts toward the Spanish major and minor. Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    SPAN 333, CINE 337
  • LNAM 334: Cine Español
    An interdisciplinary study of Spanish film, from multiple perspectives: artistic, historical, political, and socio-economic. This course will highlight the artistic achievements of Spanish filmmakers from several periods, including Luis Buñuel, Carlos Saura, and Pedro Almodovar. Readings will include essays on film history, the language of cinema, movie reviews, and interviews with directors. The course will scrutinize the links among cultural phenomena, socio-political events, and the art of filmmaking. Films will be treated as complex aesthetic objects whose language does not merely photograph socio-historical reality but transfigures it. The course will also consider Spain in its broadest Iberian sense and will include films in Catalan, Galician, and Portuguese. Classes will be based mainly on discussion interspersed with occasional lectures. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    SPAN 334, CINE 339
  • LNAM 338: Cine Latinoamericano
    An interdisciplinary study of Latin American film, from multiple perspectives: artistic, historical, political, and socio-economic. This course will highlight the artistic achievements of Latin American filmmakers from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico. We will use selected readings from original works for films that are based on fiction. A number of films have been Academy Award nominees or winners. Further readings will include a history of Latin American cinema, movie reviews, and interviews with directors. The course will scrutinize the links among cultural phenomena, socio-political events, and the art of filmmaking. Films will be treated as complex aesthetic objects whose language does not merely photograph socio-historical reality but transfigures it. Classes will be based mainly on discussion interspersed with occasional lectures. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    SPAN 338, CINE 341
  • LNAM 345: Latino Identities in Chicago
    (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • LNAM 380: Cine, Literatura y Sociedad Amr Lat
    (Cine, Literatura y Sociedad América Latina) This course is an interdisciplinary study of Latin American societies, focusing on film and literature from multiple perspectives: artistic, historical, political, and socio-economic. The seminar will highlight the magisterial artistic achievements of Latin American novelists, short story writers, and playwrights and film adaptations of their works. It will scrutinize the links between socio-political events and artistic production. Seminar materials will include films, chapters from novels, short stories, plays, and readings on film, social issues, and politics. The basic format will be discussion with occasional interactive lectures. Assignments will include short essays, oral presentations, and a final exam. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    SPAN 380, CINE 380
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  • LNAM 382: Econ Policy Making in Lat Am

  • LNAM 400: Women's Voices in Latin America
    An author, thinker, movement, or group of works studied in depth. All work in Spanish. This course will examine the role of women in Hispanic culture. Important figures such as La Malinche, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, and Eva Peron as well as the fiction, poetry, and films of Rosario Castellanos, Clarice Lispector, Gabriela Mistral, Isabel Allende, Rigoberta Menchu, Maria Luisa Bember, and Alicia Steimberg will be studied. Prerequisite: a 300-level Spanish course. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    SPAN 400, GSWS 400
  • LNAM 470: Latin American Global Business
    Emphasizes analytic activities and case problems for corporate and entrepreneurial organizations operating or considering operations in Latin America. Economic theories, statistical tests, accounting records, financial analysis, and marketing concepts will be used to investigate business situations. (May be taken by business and international relations majors to meet GEC Senior Studies Requirement. Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement if not used for GEC Senior Studies Requirement.) Prerequisites: BUSN 130 (or BUSN 180), BUSN 230, ECON 210, ECON 220, and FIN 210 (or FIN 237); or permission of instructor for Latin American Studies majors.
    BUSN 470

 

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  • LING 101: Descriptive Linguistics
    Principles and techniques of descriptive linguistics as seen through different schools of linguistics, from structuralism to modern transformational and stratificational theories. Taught in English. No prerequisites.
  • LING 201: Linguistics and Literature
    A consideration of the major linguistic theories and their implications and relations to literary criticism. Special emphasis on applications to literary criticism of transformational grammar, stratificational grammar, and tagmemics. Discussion and critical appraisal of the value of such approaches to literary analysis. Taught in English. No prerequisites.
  • LING 300: Language Learning and Teaching
    (Second Language Learning and Teaching). This course provides an overview of the research and findings on second/foreign-language learning and teaching. Students will investigate and discuss key issues associated with the area's central elements, including second-language acquisition, second-language research methods, second-language pedagogy, second-language assessment. Those considering teaching in the future can reflect on how to apply both the emerging and the ongoing developments, research, and trends in the field to classroom instruction. While this course is particularly designed for students interested in investigating the most effective methods for language instruction, it is also geared to raise awareness of how second/foreign languages are both taught and ascertained. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)

 

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  • LITR 209: Brazilian Literature
    (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • LITR 210: Don Quijote and Imperial Spain
    This course will study Cervantes's comic masterpiece in English translation. Focus will be on Cervantes's art, on analytical perspectives, and on historical background. Comparisons will be made with reinterpretations of Don Quijote, such as films and drawings. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • LITR 265: Albert Camus: Philos of the Absurd
    (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • LITR 275: Greek Greats
    (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)

 

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  • MATH 102: Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics
    (Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics with Quantitative Problem Solving.) This course focuses on the development of the quantitative skills needed for quantitative courses of study at Lake Forest College. Students will work on problems requiring application of algebraic concepts such as polynomial operations, rational expressions and equations, linear and quadratic equations, functions and their graphs, and linear systems. This 0.50-credit course meets twice weekly throughout the semester and is graded Credit/D/F. (Does not meet GEC Natural and Mathematical Sciences Requirement). Instructor approval is required. No prerequisites.
  • MATH 103: Nature of Mathematics
    Intended for students with primary interests in the humanities and social sciences. The course uses set theory, logic, and language as a foundation for studying a variety of topics central to the development of modern mathematics. Emphasizing the central role of language in mathematics, the course shows that mathematics is about communication of ideas. Topics will be explored through experimentation with computers where appropriate using games, puzzles, and group projects as well as lectures and discussions. Additional topics include codes and basic geometry. The course will focus on the interplay of different ideas.
  • MATH 104: Elem Math from Advanced Standpoint

    MATH 104: Elementary Math from an Advanced Standpoint

    This course presents a critical examination of several topics from elementary mathematics. The course stresses three themes: mathematics in the liberal arts, mathematics from a historical perspective, and mathematics as a problem-solving activity. Topics to be covered include college algebra, numeration systems, non-base-10 representations, and elementary number theory including primes and factorizations, rationals as terminating and repeating decimals, irrationals, simple probability experiments, elementary set theory, and mathematical reasoning. Cross-listed as: EDUC 104
    EDUC 104
  • MATH 105: Elementary Functions
    Properties of functions with emphasis on polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Analytic geometry. (Does not meet GEC Natural and Mathematical Sciences Requirement. Not open to students who have completed Math 110 with a grade of C- or better.)
  • MATH 110: Calculus I
    The calculus of functions of one variable. Limits, continuity, differentiation, and applications; a brief introduction to integration. Prerequisite: 3.5 years of high school mathematics (to include trigonometry) or Mathematics 105.
  • MATH 111: Calculus II
    The calculus of functions of one variable. Integration, applications of integration, sequences, and series. Prerequisite: Mathematics 110.
  • MATH 115: Honors Calculus I
    Theory and applications of the calculus of functions of one variable. Limits, continuous functions, differentiable functions, the definite integral, and applications. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
  • MATH 116: Honors Calculus II
    Continuation of Mathematics 115. Integration and applications, sequences, infinite series. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
  • MATH 150: Intro Probability & Statistics
    Designed for students in the social and life sciences. Discrete probability theory, distributions, sampling, correlation, and regression, Chi square and other tests of significance. Emphasis on the use of the computer as a tool and on applications to a variety of disciplines. Not open to students who have taken ECON/BUSN 180 or ECON/BUSN/FIN 130.
  • MATH 160: Math Methods with Applications
    (Mathematical Methods with Applications) Topics from applied mathematics, including equations, inequalities, functions and graphs, and basic properties of logarithmic and exponential functions. Introduction to limits, derivatives and antiderivatives. Applications to business, the social sciences, and the life sciences. (Not open to students who have completed Math 110 with a grade of C- or better.)
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  • MATH 161: Mathematical Modeling
    Mathematical topics as needed to build and solve mathematical models of situations in the life, environmental, and economic sciences. Topics covered include discrete dynamical systems, difference equations, linear, quadratic, and exponential growth models, the logistic model, and examples of chaos in dynamical systems.
  • MATH 210: Multivariable Calculus
    Partial differentiation, the algebra and calculus of vectors, curves and their parameterization, multiple integration, Stokes's and Green's theorem, and applications. Prerequisite: Mathematics 111.
  • MATH 211: Math of Chaos
    A study of nonlinear dynamical systems, including iteration of functions, attracting and repelling periodic orbits, bifurcation, the period doubling route to chaos, complex dynamics, fractals, and Mandelbrot and Julia sets. Real-world implications and applications of chaos. Can meet the requirements for a 300-level-or-above mathematics course on completion of an additional project approved by the instructor. Prerequisite: Mathematics 111.
  • MATH 214: Differential Equations
    Differential equation models, analytic solution techniques, qualitative solution concepts, and computer visualization for single equations and systems. Applications of differential equations. Prerequisite: Mathematics 210 or permission of the instructor.
  • MATH 230: Abstract & Discrete Mathematics
    Topics covered include logic and proofs, set theory, relations, cardinal numbers, countable and uncountable sets, permutations and combinations, graph theory, and group theory. Prerequisite: Mathematics 110.
  • MATH 231: Linear Algebra
    Vector spaces, linear independence, linear transformations, matrices, determinants, and applications to geometry. Prerequisite: Mathematics 230 or permission of the instructor.
  • MATH 310: Complex Analysis
    Study of functions of one complex variable. Analytic functions, complex integration, Cauchy's theorem, complex power series, and special functions. Applications to other areas of mathematics and to mathematical physics. Prerequisites: Mathematics 210 and 230 or permission of the instructor.
  • MATH 311: Introduction Real Analysis
    A rigorous course covering the following introductory real analysis topics: axioms for the real numbers, sequences, boundedness, limits, monotone functions, continuity, uniform continuity, Cauchy criterion for convergence, cluster points, compactness, differentiability, integration, and infinite series. Prerequisites: Mathematics 210 and 230.
  • MATH 320: Mathematical Methods

  • MATH 323: Cryptography
    An introduction to cryptology and cryptanalysis, the making of codes and the breaking of codes. History and basic concepts. Classical ciphers and attacks on classical ciphers. One-time Pad. Modern ciphers including DES, AES. Public key ciphers including RSA and Diffie-Hellman. Digital signatures. Additional topics may include Elliptic Curve systems, knapsack systems, and other cryptographic systems. Prerequisites: Mathematics 230 and Computer Science 212, or permission of the instructor.
    CSCI 323
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  • MATH 329: Number Theory
    Mathematical induction, divisibility properties of integers, prime numbers, and congruences. Prerequisite: Mathematics 230 or permission of the instructor.
  • MATH 330: Modern Algebra I
    A study of algebraic structures with emphasis on groups, rings, and fields. Prerequisite: Mathematics 230.
  • MATH 331: Modern Algebra II
    Additional topics in modern or linear algebra such as field extensions, Galois Theory, group conjugacy, modules, eigenvalue theory, dual spaces, and unitary spaces. Prerequisite: Mathematics 330 or permission of the instructor.
  • MATH 334: Theory of Computation
    This course covers fundamental ideas in the theory of computation, including formal languages, computability, complexity, and reducibility among computational problems. Topics include formal languages, finite state automata, Kleene's theorem, formal grammars, pushdown automata, context-free languages, Turing machines, computability, Church's Thesis, decidability, unsolvability, and NP- completeness. Prerequisites: CSCI 212 and Mathematics 230.
    CSCI 334
  • MATH 340: Geometry
    Selected topics from affine, Euclidean, non-Euclidean, projective, and differential geometry. Prerequisite: Mathematics 230 or permission of the instructor.
  • MATH 350: Mathematical Probability
    Discrete and continuous probability. Distributions, the law of large numbers, the central limit theorem, random variables, and generating functions. Prerequisites: Mathematics 210 and 230 or permission of the instructor.
  • MATH 351: Mathematical Statistics
    A mathematical study of such topics as estimation of parameters, confidence intervals and tests of hypotheses, decision theory, regression, analysis of variance, and nonparametric methods. Prerequisite: Mathematics 350.
  • MATH 360: Mathematical Modeling

  • MATH 365: Algebraic Coding
    A study of the algebraic structure of codes designed to transmit messages through a noisy channel in an efficient and relatively error-free fashion. Topics include finite-dimensional vector spaces over a finite field and the connection between coding theory and areas such as geometry, combinatorics, and number theory. Prerequisite: Mathematics 231 or permission of the instructor.
  • MATH 375: Combinatorics & Graph Theory
    Enumeration techniques with emphasis on permutations and combinations, generating functions, recurrence relations, inclusion and exclusion, and the pigeonhole principle. Graph theory with emphasis on trees, circuits, cut sets, planar graphs, chromatic numbers, and transportation networks. Additional topics from designs with emphasis on Latin squares, finite projective and affine geometries, block designs, and design of experiments. Prerequisite: Mathematics 230.
    CSCI 375
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  • MATH 410: Topology
    Point set topology. Such topics as topological spaces, separation axioms, covering properties, metrization, convergence and completeness, and homotopy theory. Prerequisite: Mathematics 230.
  • MATH 411: Topics in Modern Analysis
    Introductory notions of functional analysis. Banach spaces, integration and measure, Hilbert spaces, and commutative Banach algebras. Prerequisite: Mathematics 311.
  • MATH 499: Great Theorems of Mathematics
    Seminar course to introduce students to various masterpieces in the development of mathematics. Some of the most historically important proofs and ingenious logical arguments from mathematics will be presented and discussed. An emphasis will be placed on the interconnectedness among various subject areas within mathematics. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. (Meets GEC Senior Studies Requirement.)

 

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  • MUSC 101: Perspectives on Music
    An introduction to various facets of music through guided listening to selected masterpieces of Western music as well as exposure to folk music, popular music, and non-Western music. No previous knowledge is needed. Intended for non-majors.
  • MUSC 104: Men's Chorus
    The Lake Forest College Men's Chorus focuses on choral repertoire written exclusively for the male voice, from all genres and time periods. Concerts, both on and off campus, may include convention presentations, touring, and collaborations with other ensembles including the Lake Forest College Chamber Orchestra, other college and community choruses, and a wide range of soloists. Placement in this ensemble is at the discretion of the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit.
  • MUSC 105: Women's Chorus
    The Lake Forest College Women's Chorus focuses on choral repertoire written exclusively for the female voice, from all genres and time periods. Concerts, both on and off campus, may include convention presentations, touring, and collaborations with other ensembles including the Lake Forest College Chamber Orchestra, other college and community choruses, and a wide range of soloists. Placement in this ensemble is at the discretion of the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit.
  • MUSC 106: College/Community Chorus
    The Lake Forest College College/Community Chorus is an introductory mixed choral ensemble for beginning singers from the Lake Forest College Community. The College/Community Chorus performs choral music from classical, global, and popular repertoire in concerts both on and off campus. Performances may include collaborations with other ensembles including the Lake Forest College Chamber Orchestra, other collegiate and community choruses, and a wide range of soloists. No audition is required. No prerequisites. This course may be repeated for credit.
  • MUSC 107: Concert Band
    The Band performs marches, overtures, waltzes, and suites by such composers as Vaughan Williams, Holst, Sousa, and others. The ensemble is open to all students. This course may be repeated for credit.
  • MUSC 108: Chamber Orchestra
    The Chamber Orchestra is an ensemble devoted to the performance of Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and twentieth-century repertoire. The group performs two concerts each semester. The Chamber Orchestra is open to all qualified members of the College community. Auditions will be held early in the fall. This course may be repeated for credit.
  • MUSC 109: West African Drumming Ensemble
    The African Drumming Ensemble is a hands-on workshop for students of all levels interested in learning the basics of West African drumming. Students work on developing rhythmic skills using authentic instruments and learn about the role of music in the cultures of Guinea, Mali, and other countries. No prerequisite. This course may be repeated for credit.
  • MUSC 110: Jazz Ensemble
    The Jazz Ensemble performs music from big band classics and contemporary repertoire. The ensemble is open to all students by audition. This course may be repeated for credit.
  • MUSC 118: Introduction to Singing
    An introduction to vocal production for the beginning singer, including the physiology of the voice, how to sightread a vocal line, how to make your voice more beautiful and durable, how to communicate the lyrics clearly through improved diction, how to extend your range to reach notes you never thought possible, and how to deliver a song powerfully and effectively. Focusing on the novice musician, this class will prepare students to sing solos and to participate in choruses; it will also be useful for stage actors and public speakers.
  • MUSC 119: Opera Workshop
    The Opera Workshop is a course designed for advanced voice students who are participating in an opera production at Lake Forest College. Students taking this course will sing roles in operas, operettas, or opera adaptations in public performance. Participation is by audition only.
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  • MUSC 150: Fundamentals of Music
    Introduction to elements and basic principles of tonal music: notation, intervals, scales, rhythm, meter, melody, and harmony. Emphasis on listening and creative work. No prerequisite, but some musical experience is helpful.  
  • MUSC 160: Musicianship
    This course is dedicated to the development of practical skills important for a musician, including sightsinging, melodic and rhythmic dictation, and ear training. Aural and written exercises as well as creative projects will be incorporated. Music majors may substitute this course for the aural-skills proficiency exams with a grade of C or higher. Prerequisite: Music 150.
  • MUSC 170: Intro to Music Teaching & Learning
    This course introduces students to the skills of teaching music. It explores how human beings acquire musicianship, and covers the foundational elements of music education. Musical elements addressed include: musical development, musical aptitude, listening, movement, rhythm, song teaching, singing, improvisation, composition, and basic teaching techniques associated with these. Students should expect to actively engage in music making, teaching, and critical thinking. Peer teaching and clinical work with elementary students are key components of this course. Prerequisite: MUSC 150 or permission of instructor.
    EDUC 170, MUSE 170
  • MUSC 204: The Singing Statesmen
    The Lake Forest College Singing Statesmen is the premier choral ensemble for men's voices at Lake Forest College. The ensemble performs choral music from classical, global, and popular repertoire in concerts both on and off campus. Performances may include convention presentations, touring, and collaborations with other ensembles including the Lake Forest College Chamber Orchestra, other collegiate and community choruses, and a wide range of soloists. Members of this ensemble are drawn from the ranks of the Concert Choir. Placement in this ensemble is contingent upon an audition, held at the beginning of the year. Prerequisite: 1 semester of MUSC 104 or MUSC 106, or permission of the instructor. Co-requisite: MUSC 206. This course may be repeated for credit.
  • MUSC 205: Advanced Women's Chorale
    The Lake Forest College Advanced Women's Chorale is the premier choral ensemble for women's voices at Lake Forest College. The Chorale performs choral music from classical, global, and popular repertoire in concerts both on and off campus. Performances may include convention presentations, touring, and collaborations with other ensembles including the Lake Forest College Chamber Orchestra, other collegiate and community choruses, and a wide range of soloists. Membership in this ensemble is contingent upon a voice placement hearing, held at the beginning of the year. This course may be repeated for credit.
  • MUSC 206: Concert Choir
    The Lake Forest College Concert Choir is the premier large mixed choral ensemble at Lake Forest College. Concert Choir performs choral music from classical, global, and popular repertoire in concerts both on and off campus. Performances may include convention presentations, and collaborations with other ensembles including the Lake Forest College Chamber Orchestra, other collegiate and community choruses, and a wide range of soloists. Membership in this ensemble is contingent upon a voice placement hearing, held at the beginning of the year. Prerequisite: 1 year of MUSC 104, 105, 106, or 205; or permission of the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit.
  • MUSC 217: World Music Survey
    Survey of music of the world's peoples: music in the cultures of Africa, Asia, and Latin America; the social and cultural roles of music. No prerequisite. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • MUSC 220: Songwriting
    How to write songs. Emphasis on popular forms in the styles of the 1960s to the present, including pop, rock, folk, Broadway, and others. Covers text, setting, forms, harmony, instrumentation, arranging, studio techniques, and performance. Prerequisite: Music 150.
  • MUSC 221: Speakers and Phones Workshop
    Through extensive production and critique, the Speakers & Phones Workshop fosters artistic growth among beginners and experienced creators. The Workshop doesn?t depend on access to expensive recording equipment and studios. We use our memories, our bodies, our voices, musical instruments, pen and paper, apps, our smart phones, tablets, laptops? whatever amateur or professional sound-generating and recording equipment participants own or can get ahold of on their own. We edit and polish our audio creations and then distribute them online in attention-grabbing ways. Participants are encouraged to work from their strengths and to push beyond their comfort zones in order to create audio work that ranges from music to sound collage to spoken word to storytelling to journalism. No formal training is required. The only prerequisites are the ability to hear, a willingness to work hard, an open mind and ready access to either a computer or a smart phone.
  • MUSC 222: Grateful Dead and American Culture
    More than fifty years after the band?s founding, the Grateful Dead looms larger than ever. From Haight-Ashbury acid-testers to visionary entrepreneurs, the band that grew up and out of the revolutions of the tumultuous 1960s found a way to mix everything from roots music to free jazz to rock into an "endless tour" that put them in the Fortune 500. The Grateful Dead provided a cultural soundtrack for not only the 1960s, but also the paranoia of the Watergate years, the Reagan-soaked 1980s, and on to the jam-band present. This course will focus on the band?s performance of authentic "Americanness" throughout its half century run. We'll listen to their music, and also to their fans, enthusiasts, and scholars. We'll understand the various subcultures that separate the sixties and now, and in doing so, offer answers to this key question: Why do the Dead survive? (Elective for English, Theater, and Music)
    AMER 200, ENGL 251, THTR 206
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  • MUSC 225: Intro to Electronic Music
    Designed to foster creative work in the College's recording/electronic music studio, the course deals first with the history of electronic music (Futurism, musique concrete, early analog analysis) and then with studio techniques, using both analog and digital equipment, microphones, tape recorders, mixing, digital synthesis, and a creative project. Two regular sessions and one laboratory each week. Co-requisite: Music 150.
  • MUSC 227: History of Jazz
    Principal styles of representative jazz musicians; the roots (including blues and ragtime); jazz in New Orleans and Chicago; and big band, swing, bop, and fusion. No prerequisite. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    AMER 227, AFAM 227
  • MUSC 235: 20th Cent Theater: Musical Theater
    A study of representative musical comedies, operettas, and related works that will provide topics for papers by students. Emphasis will be placed on relationship to political, social, and cultural events. Videotapes of musicals are viewed and discussed. Among works to be discussed are Show Boat, Oklahoma!, South Pacific, My Fair Lady, Hair, Jesus Christ Superstar, A Little Night Music, Sunday in the Park with George, and others.
    AMER 236, ENGL 236
  • MUSC 237: Hip-Hop, Race, & Culture
    A musical examination of the roles hip-hop, the hip-hop community and mainstream popular culture have played in reinforcing, critiquing and disrupting racial identity in the United States. In 1988, after the release of their hit, "F**k tha Police", the American hip-hop group N.W.A. was considered a danger to the nation, something akin to a terrorist group. In 1970, just prior to the advent of hip-hop and when funk music, hip-hop's precursor, was coming into full bloom, anthropologist Margaret Meade and author James Baldwin sat down for an extended discussion about race. During the course of their conversation, Meade pointed out that, biologically speaking, there is no such thing as race, that the notion of race is a myth. Baldwin agreed, but noted that when they both walked outside, that very same myth could get him killed. Music and race matter. This course traces the history and significance of hip-hop music, focusing on the social forces that created the genre and the impact the genre has had on society?s notions of race. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    AFAM 238
  • MUSC 251: Music Theory I
    Basic elements of tonal harmony including triads, seventh chords, figured bass, harmonic progression, voice leading, and four-part writing. Prerequisite: Music 150 or consent of the instructor.
  • MUSC 252: Music Theory II
    A continuation of the study of harmony, including modulation, chromatic harmony, and counterpoint. Prerequisite: Music 251 or consent of the instructor. 
  • MUSC 262: Great Composers
    In this course we will examine the lives and works of three significant composers in detail. Each semester the three selected composers will change. Some of the composers might include: Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, Mahler, Stravinsky, Schoenberg, Copland, Duke Ellington, John Adams, and others. The course involves biographical readings, close listening analysis, and concert attendance. No prerequisite.
  • MUSC 264: History of Rock and Roll
    This course covers the history of rock music from its origins in the blues and American country music to the diverse rock styles heard today. Analysis of performances and compositional styles of several familiar rock stars is included. Social and political influences will be addressed, but the focus will be on the music itself. No prerequisite.
    AMER 264
  • MUSC 265: American Music
    Music in the United States from the time of the pilgrims to the present day. The course includes art music, folk music, religious music, and jazz. Prerequisite: Any music class or consent of the instructor.
    AMER 273
  • MUSC 266: Music in Film
    Music has played an important part of the movie-going experience since the beginnings of the film industry in the 1890's, and the blending of music and drama has deeper roots still. This course charts the development of music and sound in film, from these deep roots through the mis-named silent-movie era and on to the great film composers of the twentieth century and today. Students will learn the fundamental elements of a film score, investigate how a film composer works, and develop a vocabulary for describing and assessing film music. No prior knowledge of music or film history is necessary.
    AMER 266, CINE 266
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  • MUSC 267: Disney, Music and Culture
    Walt Disney created an empire both influencing and being influenced by society and culture since its inception. Disney films, music, propaganda, media, business practices, and merchandise have been imbedded into popular culture. Disney, Music, and Culture is an introduction to the history and content of the Disney Corporation, the films and soundtracks, and a critical look at them through the lenses of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and disability, among others. A major element of this course will involve viewing Disney films and analyzing critically based on the lenses mentioned above. The evolution of how Disney utilized music will also be examined at length. Cross-listed with American Studies. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    AMER 272
  • MUSC 270: Beginning Conducting
    This course is designed to expose music students to the essential skills of the successful conductor. The course combines the theoretical skills of score analysis and aural imaging with the practical skills of baton and rehearsal techniques. Class sessions will be devoted to lecture, discussion, and practical lab experience, using the students in the class as an ensemble. Prerequisite: MUSC 251 or permission of instructor.
  • MUSC 271: Teaching Winds and Percussion
    MUSC 271: The Art of Teaching Wind and Percussion Instruments. This course introduces students to the techniques of teaching woodwind, brass, and percussion instruments. Students will develop competency on these instruments and learn appropriate instructional strategies to teach these instruments. Specific instruments include: flute, clarinet, alto saxophone, trumpet, horn, trombone, euphonium, snare drum, and bells. Students should expect to actively engage in music making, teaching, and critical thinking. Peer teaching and clinical work with elementary/middle school students are key components of this course. Prerequisites: EDUC 170 Corequisites: No corequisites
    MUSE 271, EDUC 271
  • MUSC 272: Teaching String Instruments
    MUSC 272: The Art of Teaching String Instruments. This course introduces students to the techniques of playing and teaching string instruments. Students will develop competency on these instruments and learn appropriate instructional strategies to teach these instruments. Specific instruments include: violin, viola, cello, and bass. Students should expect to actively engage in music making, teaching, and critical thinking. Peer teaching and clinical work with elementary/middle school students are key components of this course. Prerequisites: EDUC 170, with a grade of B- or better. Corequisites: No corequisites.
    MUSE 272, EDUC 272
  • MUSC 273: Teaching Instrumental Ensembles
    MUSC 273: The Art of Teaching Instrumental Ensembles. This course introduces students to the techniques of teaching bands and orchestras. This course is intended to provide students with a strong foundation of both skill and conceptual understanding in order to prepare them for a career in instrumental music education. It involve learning within both a college classroom setting and as a teacher and observer within K-12 schools. Specific elements include: conducting, score study, rehearsal technique, practical elements associated with organizing and executing an instrumental ensemble, and band/orchestra literature. Students should expect to actively engage in music making, teaching, and critical thinking. Peer teaching and clinical work with middle school students are key components of this course. Prerequisites: EDUC 170 with a grade of B- or better. Corequisites: No corequisites.
    MUSE 273, EDUC 273
  • MUSC 274: Teaching Choral Ensembles
    MUSC 274: The Art of Teaching Choral Ensembles. This course introduces students to the techniques of teaching choir. This course is intended to provide students with a strong foundation of both skill and conceptual understanding in order to prepare them for a career in vocal music education. It involves learning within both a classroom setting and as a teacher and observer within K-12 schools. Specific elements include: conducting, score study, rehearsal technique, practical elements associated with organizing and executing a choral ensemble, and choral literature. Students should expect to actively engage in music making, teaching, and critical thinking. Peer teaching and clinical work with middle school students are key components of this course. Prerequisites: EDUC 170 with a grade of B- or better. Corequisites: No corequisites.
    MUSE 274, EDUC 274
  • MUSC 280: Wagner,Tolkien, and Star Wars
    An in-depth comparative study of three epic masterpieces of Western culture: Richard Wagner's The Ring of the Nibelungen, J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings (through the films by Peter Jackson), and George Lucas' original Star Wars trilogy. Special consideration will be given to the role of music in each of these epics (including the film scores of John Williams and Howard Shore).
  • MUSC 285: Creative Arts Entrepreneurship
    Creative Arts Entrepreneurship will offer an overview of the processes, practices, and decision-making activities that lead to the realization of our creative ideas. Students from across the humanities, arts, sciences, and business will learn the unique contexts and challenges of creative careers, with an emphasis on collaborative projects. The course will help students understand the nature and structure of arts enterprise while cultivating their own career vision and creative goals. Creative Arts Entrepreneurship is designed for students interested in developing, launching, or advancing innovative enterprises in arts, culture, and design, and those who love the initiative, ingenuity and excitement of putting creative ideas into action. The course combines readings and in-class discussions with site visits, case studies, guest lectures by working artists and creative professionals, and student-driven projects. No prerequisites.
    ENTP 285, ART 285, ENGL 285, THTR 285
  • MUSC 287: Music of the Arab World
    Study of the history and repertories of Arabic music from the traditional or 'classical' music to contemporary popular music, including music associated with religious practices. Emphasis on understanding music in culture and the theory and performance practice of Arabic music. No prerequisite. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • MUSC 306: Chamber Singers
    The Lake Forest College Chamber Singers is a selective mixed choral ensemble whose members are drawn from the roster of the Concert Choir. Chamber Singers performs vocal chamber music from classical, global, and popular repertoire in concerts both on and off campus. Performances may include convention presentations, touring, and collaborations with other ensembles including the Lake Forest College Chamber Orchestra, other collegiate and community choruses, and a wide range of soloists. Membership in this ensemble is contingent upon a voice placement hearing, held at the beginning of the year. Co-requisite: MUSC 206. (May be taken for .25 credit or 0 credit).
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  • MUSC 325: Adv Electronic Music
    A continuation of Music 225. More independent work and hard disk recording. Prerequisite: Music 225.
  • MUSC 351: Music Theory III
    (Music Theory III: Atonal Systems and Theory of Jazz, Rock and World Music) This course will explore the theoretical systems of atonal and post-tonal music, including set theory and serialism. Theories and analyses of jazz, rock and world music will also be presented and explored. Prerequisite: Music 252.
  • MUSC 352: Form and Tonal Analysis
    Study of the principal forms in Western art music including binary and ternary forms, sonata, theme and variation, and rondo. This course covers analysis of tonal masterworks of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, including music of J. S. Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, and Brahms, applying the knowledge gained in the study of tonal harmony. Prerequisite: Music 351.
  • MUSC 360: Music History I
    (Music History I: From Chant to Bach) An introduction to the music of the Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Baroque periods. Composers emphasized include Machaut, Josquin, Palestrina, Lassus, Monteverdi, Schutz, Purcell, A. Scarlatti, Handel, and Bach. Music 360 and 361 may be taken out of order. Prerequisite: Music 150 or consent of the instructor.
  • MUSC 361: Music His II:Classical to Contemp
    Representative composers and compositions from the Classical and Romantic periods will be discussed, including Mozart, Beethoven, Haydn, Tchaikovsky, Brahms, and Wagner. The many trends and styles of music of the twentieth century will be covered, including Impressionism, Expressionism, Neo-Classicism, Minimalism, and Indeterminacy. Composers will include Debussy, Ravel, Schoenberg, Reich, and Cage. Music 360 and 361 may be taken out of order. Prerequisite: Music 150 or consent of the instructor.
  • MUSC 480: Senior Seminar
    This course covers analysis of twentieth-century music, composition, and conducting. As part of the conducting component, students will have the opportunity to conduct a rehearsal of the Lake Forest College Chorus or Chamber Orchestra. Other special topics may also be included.

 

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  • NEUR 116: Exploring the Brain
    This course will address how the mind and brain work by exploring current and classical neurobiological topics, particularly those of interest to college students, through the use of professional and academic journals, textbooks, popular magazines and newspapers, as well as other media sources. Topics will include neuronal development and neuronal death; diseases of the brain, such as Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, depression, and psychiatric disorders; and topics such as drugs and alcoholism.
    BIOL 116
  • NEUR 130: Bio Inq: Deadly Shape Hostage Brain
    (Biological Inquiry Seminar: Deadly Shapes, Hostage Brains) Age-related neurological diseases that hold our brain hostage are major 21st-century global health burdens and are among the most actively funded areas of medical research. In this course, students will delve into primary literature through research projects that investigate how deadly protein shapes underlie complex neurodegenerative illnesses, like Alzheimer's, Huntington disease, and Parkinson disease and discover how little we still know, despite astonishing advances. Students will dissect human brains to understand the underlying brain pathology. Trips to Chicago to visit neurology laboratories, neuroscience research centers, and attend a major neuroscience conference will present the latest advances in neurological research. Additionally, students will debate ethical dilemmas that face society as neuroscientists race towards solving current medical mysteries and experiment with potential new treatments. Students who have taken FIYS106 will not receive credit for this course. Two discussion/lecture and two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 120. Corequisite: CHEM 116.
    BIOL 130
  • NEUR 291: Descartes to Kant
    Seventeenth- and eighteenth-century European philosophers, with a primary focus on epistemology and metaphysics, including the essence of the mind and its relation to the body. Readings will include Descartes, Spinoza, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. No prerequisites.
    PHIL 291
  • NEUR 296: Philosophy of the Mind
    With the rise of Cognitive Science, Computer Science, and Neuroscience, questions about the nature of mind have become increasingly important, and in the last 40 years much work on philosophy of mind has been done in analytic philosophy. The class will begin with an examination of some of the most influential texts in philosophy of mind from the last 50 years, and then proceed to current topics. Central questions may include: What is the relationship between the mind and the brain? Is it possible to offer explanations of mental states by reducing them to biological, chemical, or physical states? Can human consciousness be best explained in terms of a computer model? Is it possible to describe the functioning of human thought in terms of a rule-based system of processing?
    PHIL 296
  • NEUR 310: Sensation and Pereception
    As you go through your day, you are constantly sensing and perceiving: You feel the warmth of the hot shower on your skin, you smell the aroma of the coffee in your cup, you taste the disagreeable tartness of your orange juice after brushing your teeth, you see the bright colors of the spring day on your way to class, you hear the words of your instructor and you organize them into coherent ideas. This course explores the anatomy and physiology of the sensory systems and the way in which the raw sensory signals become organized into meaningful perceptions. Prerequisite: PSYC 222 with a grade of at least C-. (Cross listed as PSYC 310).
    PSYC 310
  • NEUR 320: Learning
    This course examines the theoretical approaches, historical influences, and contemporary research in human and animal learning. In addition to providing a strong background in classical, operant, and contemporary conditioning models, this course explores the applications of these principles in a variety of contexts, such as behavioral therapy, drug addiction, self-control, decision-making, motor skill acquisition, and education. Furthermore, this course surveys the commonalities and differences across species in cognitive processes, such as memory, reasoning, problem-solving, and language. Prerequisite: Psychology 222 with a grade of at least C-.
    PSYC 320
  • NEUR 324: Advanced Cell Biology
    The structure and function of the cell and its organelles, with emphasis on membrane-related processes including transport, energetics, cell-to-cell signaling, and nerve and muscle cell function. Research reports will include extensive library and Internet exploration and analysis. Three lecture and four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: Biol 221, and either Biol 220 or Junior status.
    BIOL 324
  • NEUR 330: Motivation and Emotion
    The broad range of motivations and emotions is studied including the relative contributions of learning, genetics, and critical periods in development. How and why did motivations and emotions evolve, and what are their bases in brain systems, hormones, and other aspects of physiology? Which of our motivations involve accurate regulations to a 'set point' (such as body temperature and weight) and which do not? How does the great subtlety of human emotional expression develop? Includes consideration of competency, security, creativity, frustration, aggression, love, sexuality, and values. Prerequisite: PSYC 221 with a grade of at least C-. (Cross listed as PSYC 330).
    PSYC 330
  • NEUR 340: Animal Physiology
    This course will focus on mechanisms of homeostasis in vertebrates and invertebrates. A particular emphasis will be placed on examining specific adaptations (functional, morphological, and behavioral) to different environmental conditions, as well as problems associated with physical size. Topics will include integration and response to stimuli, gas exchange, circulation, movement, buoyancy, metabolism, thermal regulation, osmoregulation, and excretion. Three lecture and four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: Biol 221, and either Biol 220 or Junior status.
    BIOL 340
  • NEUR 342: Developmental Biology
    Analysis of the genetic, molecular, and structural changes that occur between fertilization and the development of the adult form. This course will examine many concepts including establishment of cell fates, embryonic patterning, and morphogenesis. Students will also analyze key experiments and methods that have provided an understanding of development. The laboratory will demonstrate important developmental principles, such as fertilization, gastrulation, differentiation, and morphogenesis though the use of invertebrate and vertebrate organisms. Three discussion and four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 221, CHEM 116. (Cross listed as BIOL 342).
    BIOL 342
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  • NEUR 344: Animal Behavior
    A study of current ideas about the biological basis and evolution of animal behavior. Topics will include molecular, hormonal, and genetic bases of behavior; adaptive behavior patterns; mating systems and reproductive behavior; and evolution of altruism and helping behavior. Three lecture and four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: Biol 220, and either Biol 221 or Junior status.
    BIOL 344
  • NEUR 346: Molecular Neuroscience
    Neurobiology associated with brain function (perception, movement, homeostasis, affect, and cognition), neurological and psychiatric illnesses, and brain injury. A reading- and writing-intensive course with a problem-based learning approach that comprehensively explores the breadth of neurobiology (molecular, cellular, anatomical, physiological, behavioral, and medical). Laboratory exercises emphasize neuroanatomy and neuronal cell biology. Several experimental projects complement lecture and laboratory learning. Six hours per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 221, CHEM 116.
    BIOL 346L
  • NEUR 350: Abnormal Psychology
    Intended to acquaint students with the biological, emotional, behavioral, and cognitive foundations of psychopathology. Issues of classification, description, etiology, and treatment of abnormal behavior are examined from the point of view of contemporary empirically based perspectives. Specifically, these issues are considered in the context of a variety of psychopathological manifestations, including anxiety, eating, schizophrenic, mood, personality, addictive, and sexual disorders. Prerequisite: Psychology 221 with a grade of at least C-.
    PSYC 350
  • NEUR 352: Molecular Genetics
    A study of the molecular basis for inheritance, particularly with respect to human traits and disorders. Topics include the structure, expression, and segregation of genes and chromosomes, use of model organisms in the study of human disease, genetic engineering and gene therapy, and principles of genome science. Laboratory will apply current molecular techniques to an original research problem. Three lecture and four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: Biol 221, and either Biol 220 or Junior status.
    BIOL 352
  • NEUR 354: The Mind Onstage
    (The Mind Onstage: Theatre and Cognition.) In the last decade, prominent theater scholars have integrated neuroscience research into their studies. Their excitement stems from the realization that current scientific research seems to speak directly to one of the major concerns of theatre scholars for decades: How does performing and/or watching a performance affect the brain? In this interdisciplinary class, students will read the work of scholars such as Rhonda Blair and Rick Kemp, in addition to creating their own performances, as we explore the ways science and the humanities can intersect. No prerequisites.
    THTR 354
  • NEUR 360: Cognitive Psychology
    Surveys the history, philosophy, and research surrounding selected issues in cognitive psychology, including perception, attention, memory, language, imagery, reasoning, problem-solving, and decision-making. Students will learn what is currently known about these topics, the problems facing researchers, and how researchers go about solving these problems. They also will be given the opportunity to experience cognitive psychology research first-hand, as they participate in classic experiments and learn to analyze, interpret, and write up their results. Prerequisite: Psychology 222 with a grade of at least C-.
    PSYC 360
  • NEUR 362: Mechanisms of Brain Dysfunction
    This course will examine the biochemical and molecular basis of both rare and common nervous system disorders that are at the frontiers of molecular medicine. Students will select from illnesses that disable processes as diverse as memory, language, cognition, sensation, movement, emotion, and homeostasis. A special emphasis will be placed on investigating the primary causes of dysfunction, such as the role of protein misfolding, genetics, and neurotransmitters. By discussing the latest primary literature students will gain current understanding of neurological and psychiatric illnesses, as well as insights into the techniques and methods used in this field. Students will seek to further new knowledge by authoring an original grant proposal. Finally, depending on the semester offered, students will serve as advanced peer mentors for first year students either enrolled in FIYS 106 or BIOL 130 courses. Prerequisite: BIOL 221. Two 80-minute sessions per week.
    BIOL 362
  • NEUR 370: Neuroscience and Behavior
    How do the brain's neurons, synapses, and electrical and chemical activities participate in psychological processes? What are the neural foundations of human perception, motivation and emotion, learning, memory, movement, and consciousness? Discussion of the modes of action of antidepressants, other psychotherapeutic drugs, and drugs of abuse. In what ways are functions localized in the brain, and how is it possible for recovery from brain damage to take place? Laboratory sessions include experiments in brain foundations of sensation, movement, emotion, and learning in animals, demonstration of human brain waves, comparison of brains with computers, and basic exercises in computerized data acquisition and analysis. Prerequisite: a college course in mathematics or natural science approved by the instructor (such as the core introductory courses in biology or chemistry) or PSYC 221 with a grade of at least C-.
    PSYC 370L
  • NEUR 372: Pharmacology: Drug, Brain, Behavior
    In this course, we will explore ideas and principles regarding neuronal communication and drug interactions that govern behavior. We will explore communication patterns of both electrical and chemical signaling, define complex dynamics of drug distributions and identify how these processes are influenced by individual genetics. This class will also investigate the interaction between neurotransmitters and drugs at specific neuronal receptors, which will be discussed from the perspective of agonism and antagonism. We will use these principles to guide our understanding of pharmaco-therapeutics that are focused on symptom targeting. Students will also have the opportunity to discuss clinical cases and participate in the development of strategic therapeutic approaches based on current research towards the treatment of psychiatric and neurological disorders. Prerequisites: PSYC110 and BIOL221 with a grade of at least C-, or permission of instructor.
    BIOL 372, PSYC 372
  • NEUR 389: Evolution
    This course will focus on the mechanisms of evolutionary change, ranging from short-term microevolutionary processes within populations to the origins of new species. Topics will include evidence for evolution, short-term microevolutionary processes, natural selection, adaptation, phylogenetic reconstruction, divergence and speciation, 'evo-devo', and human evolution. Classroom sessions will consist of lectures, discussions, and student presentations. Three lecture and four laboratory hours per week (including Field Museum trips). Prerequisites: Biol 220, and either Biol 221 or Junior status.
    BIOL 389
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  • NEUR 420: The Neuroscience of Reward
    "Reward" is a concept with which most people are familiar: a hard-earned vacation at the end of a grueling work schedule, an A grade on a particularly challenging academic assignment, a good meal and a glass of wine after a long day?s work. However, this everyday usage of the term belies its complexity. In this course, we will explore "reward" from behavioral and neurobiological perspectives, often focusing on associative learning paradigms that allow for careful dissection of appetitive and consummatory behaviors. We will consider the underlying neural circuitry that enables individuals to learn about rewards and cues that signal these motivationally significant events. Our analysis will emphasize the similarities and distinctions between natural reward and drug reward. Prerequisite: PSYC 222 with a grade of at least C- or advanced standing in another major, with permission of the instructor. Preference in registration to graduating seniors majoring in psychology or neuroscience.

    PSYC 420
  • NEUR 425: Artificial Intelligence
    An introduction to AI via topics including tree and graph searches, min-max methods, alpha-beta pruning, heuristics, backtracking, natural language processing, and computer vision. Prerequisite: Computer Science 212.
    CSCI 425
  • NEUR 450: Health Psychology
    This course explores a variety of research and clinical issues in health psychology. Representative topics include the role of behavior in health and disease, the neurobiology of emotion, the major stress-related and behavior-related disorders (e.g., coronary heart disease, cancer, headaches, AIDS), prevention strategies, and psychologically based treatment approaches. Our primary focus will be a methodological and conceptual analysis of the health psychology literature, which we will consider from a scientific perspective. An understanding of these issues, however, should help you become a more critical consumer of health information and health advice offered by the media, and may inspire you to make positive changes in your own health-related behavior and lifestyle. Prerequisite: Psychology 222 with a grade of at least C- or advanced standing in another major, with permission of the instructor. Preference in registration to graduating seniors majoring in psychology or neuroscience.
    PSYC 450
  • NEUR 479: Sr Sem: Receptors and Signal Transd
    Senior Seminar: Receptors and Signal Transduction. This course is designed to provide a capstone experience for biology and neuroscience majors. It will focus on the neurobiology of sensory receptors and signal transduction mechanisms. Specific topics will depend on student interests, and may include photoreception, chemoreception, mechanoreception, electroreception, thermoreception, magnetoreception, and/or nociception. Classes will involve discussions of the primary literature, student presentations, and short lectures. Prerequisite: Open to senior biology and neuroscience majors who have completed at least one 300-level course in the major or by permission of the instructor.
    BIOL 479
  • NEUR 480: Sr Sem: Neural Frontiers
    This course is designed to provide a scholarship capstone for biology and neuroscience majors. Students will explore diverse topics of their interest at the frontiers of neuroscience, one of the most active research fields of the 21st century that is regularly considered as science's final frontier. Students will select from topics as diverse as memory, language, cognition, sensation, movement, neural stem cells, and complex neurological diseases. Students will engage in the art of being a scientific scholar in three complementary ways. They will learn new knowledge by discussing the latest primary literature in journal clubs. They will seek new knowledge by authoring an original grant proposal. They will explore how a career in science extends knowledge by role-playing a world famous neuroscientist. Finally students will serve as consultants for First-Year Studies students. Prerequisite: Open to senior biology and neuroscience majors who have completed at least one 300-level course in the major or by permission of the instructor.
    BIOL 480
  • NEUR 481: Sr Sem: Oncology
    (Senior Seminar: Oncology) This course will examine characteristics of cancer at the cellular and organismal levels, as well as investigate the current methods of treatment and prevention of cancer. This will involve intensive library research, report writing, and student led discussions and presentations. Two 80-minute meetings per week. Prerequisite: Open to senior biology and neuroscience majors who have completed at least one 300-level course in the major or by permission of the instructor.
    BIOL 481
  • NEUR 482: Sr Sem: Sex & Evolution
    (Senior Seminar: Sex and Evolution) An application of evolutionary principles to understanding phenomena related to sexual reproduction. This seminar will emphasize theory and empirical tests of theory reported in the primary literature in evolution, behavior, and genetics. Exact topics will depend on student interests. Classes will involve discussions, student presentations, and short lectures. Prerequisite: Open to senior biology and neuroscience majors who have completed at least one 300-level course in the major or by permission of the instructor.
    BIOL 482
  • NEUR 485: Senior Seminar: The Nobel Prizes
    (Senior Seminar: The Nobel Prizes: A Century of Innovation and Discovery) Koch, Fleming, Muller, Watson, Crick, von Bekesy, Golgi, and y Cajal are all Nobel Prize winners. Why are some names known to non-science students, whereas others are not even recognizable to most scientists? Every fall the Nobel Prize committee announces their awards. While their deliberations are shrouded in secrecy, the fame of the award is such that the general public often knows the names of winners. This course will examine the work and life of select prize winners in physiology/medicine and chemistry over the past 100 years. Reading will include the original work by the Novel laureates, as well as biographies and autobiographies of the winners. Discussion, presentations and papers will examine the impact of the winners' work, including a critical analysis of how important the work was at the time and how important it remains today, and why some awards were given years after the work was conducted, while others were recognized within a few years. The course will also include a history of the prize and of Alfred Nobel, and explore controversies associated with the award, including the dearth of female recipients. The semester will conclude with nominations for next year's award winners. Prerequisite: Open to senior biology and neuroscience majors who have completed at least one 300-level course in the major or by permission of the instructor.
    BIOL 485
  • NEUR 488: Sr Sem: Cellular Basis of Disease
    (Senior Seminar: Cellular Basis of Disease) A study of the cellular and molecular basis of infectious diseases and their treatments, including viral and acterial agents, through intensive library research, report writing, and student presentations. Prerequisite: Open to senior biology and neuroscience majors who have completed at least one 300-level course in the major or by permission of the instructor.
    BIOL 488
  • NEUR 489: Sr Sem: Biology of War
    War can have devastating effects on human health and the environment. Factors considered in this course include nuclear fallout, widespread pesticide (e.g. Agent Orange), biological weapons, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, and natural resource availability. An analysis of primary literature will be used to explore and analyze the myriad biological effects of modern and historical warfare. Prerequisite: Open to senior biology and neuroscience majors who have completed at least one 300-level course in the major or by permission of the instructor.
    BIOL 489
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  • NEUR 493: Research Project
    Research in collaboration with a departmental faculty member. Consult with any member of the department for application information.
  • NEUR 494: Senior Thesis
    Research guided by a departmental faculty member culminating in a senior thesis, fulfilling the College's Senior Studies Requirement. Consult any member of the department for further information.

 

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  • PHIL 110: Introduction to Philosophy
    Examination of perennial philosophical issues, such as questions about the nature of reality and how we can know it, discussions of human nature, the meaning of life, and our moral responsibilities. (Meets GEC First-Year Writing Requirement.)
  • PHIL 112: Reason and the Irrational
    The confrontation and dialogue between rationality and the powers of desire, will, spontaneity, and freedom. Discussion will focus on readings from Plato, Descartes, Spinoza, Nietzsche, Kafka, Sartre, and Buber. (Meets GEC First-Year Writing Requirement.)
  • PHIL 114: Intro to Phil: Asian Thought
    Introduction, through representative Asian thinkers from India, China, and Japan, to fundamental philosophical issues such as the nature and meaning of human existence, what true happiness is, and what is real. (Meets GEC First-Year Writing Requirement.)
  • PHIL 117: Political Philosophy
    By tracing the development of political philosophy from its roots in Greek philosphy through the social contract tradition to modern liberalism and critiques of colonialism, this course will examine a number of questions central to political philosophy. What is the state? What model of government is best? What is the nature of political rights? How do governments gain legitimate authority? Readings will include Socrates, Plato, Locke, Mill, Marx, Martin Luther King Jr., Rawls, Nozick, Chomsky, Churchill, and Galeano.
  • PHIL 118: Why Philosophy Matters-Applied Eth
    (Why Philosophy Matters: Applied Ethics) We will examine ethical issues related to topics like killing, family, sex, race relations, and the state. Some of the questions we will explore include: Is killing in war wrong? Is abortion wrong? Is prostitution wrong? Is same-sex marriage wrong? Are reparations for slavery wrong? We will not only learn why philosophy matters when it comes to those views we hold most dear, but we will also learn how philosophers argue for their views and, in turn, how we should go about arguing for our own.
  • PHIL 156: Logic and Styles of Arguments
    Focus on the 'rhyme and reason' of language. Examination of the reasons arguments are constructed in the ways they are. Investigation of informal, Aristotelian, and propositional logics, with readings from magazine articles, advertisements, and classical philosophers.
  • PHIL 200: Philosophy & Gender
    What is gender? Is it the same as one's sex? Is it inborn or learned? In this course, we'll investigate these questions, as well as how gender differences do or ought to change our theories of human existence and human good. A comparison of classical, modern, and postmodern treatments of the effect of gender on love, knowledge, and ethical obligation. Reading may include Plato, Aristotle, Rousseau, Mary Shelley, Freud, de Beauvoir, and Irigaray.(Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    GSWS 200
  • PHIL 203: Business & Professional Ethics
    Analysis and evaluation of ethical problems in business and the professions. Attention will be given to the moral foundations for and limits on business activities, the idea of professional responsibility, and the relationship between professional and business obligations and general moral obligations. (Not recommended for first-year students.)
  • PHIL 205: Medical Ethics
    The course will investigate the three primary strands of medical ethics: (1) issues of professional responsibility, such as confidentiality and informed consent, (2) moral dilemmas that arise in the course of treatment, such as decisions about euthanasia, and (3) public policy matters, such as universal health care.
  • PHIL 210: Environmental Ethics
    Examination of relationships between human beings and nature, drawing on literature, religion, and natural science as well as philosophy. What views have shaped our current perceptions, concerns, uses, and misuses of the natural world? What creative alternatives can we discover? How can these be applied to the practical problems of environmental ethics?
    ES 210
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  • PHIL 212: Multicultural Approaches Environmnt
    The central theme of this course is Humans and Nature. We will examine various motifs in the creation myths from different cultures, the images of man and woman, the theme of primeval flood or its absence, the alienation of humans from nature, and the beliefs (e.g., Chinese numerology) in the synchronicity between human affairs and natural events. We will search for answers to the following typical questions: What is the definition of environment? What is and ought to be the relation between humans and nature? What count as 'environmental issues' and what are their possible solutions? (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • PHIL 214: Educational Reform in the U.S.
    This course will explore the meaning of educational reform in the United States, both from a historical and philosophical perspective and in the context of contemporary educational policy. Students will begin the course by studying the progressive educational reform movement of the early twentieth century. They will look at ways in which progressive education initiatives, including the open education movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s, have been challenged by proponents of standardization in schools. Charter schools, magnet schools, school vouchers, and No Child Left Behind also will be examined in order to better understand how the notion of educational reform is one that can be viewed from a wide variety of perspectives and within multiple contexts.
    EDUC 212, AMER 212
  • PHIL 220: Philosophy of Education
    Survey of significant theories of education, introduction to philosophical analysis of educational concepts, and development of analytical skills applicable to clarifying and resolving pedagogical and policy issues.
    EDUC 220
  • PHIL 223: Does God Exist?
    This course considers arguments for and against the existence of God, as well as the resources and methods those arguments use. After some discussion of logic and argumentation, we will consider questions such as: how could one demonstrate that God does or does not exist? What would constitute 'proof' of such a claim? How are faith and reason working for similar or opposed ends in such arguments? What does the character of arguments for or against God's existence say about human life and thought? To address these questions, we will consider the works of theologians and philosophers from monotheistic traditions.
    RELG 223
  • PHIL 225: Philosophy of Science
    Examination of issues such as the nature of scientific knowledge, what counts as a 'true' scientific theory, the basis of observation, and empirical knowledge. Consideration of ethical issues generated by scientific practice, the politics of technology, and current work on the sociology of scientific knowledge.
    ES 225
  • PHIL 230: Philosophy and Literature
    The question of meaning in and of literature. The philosophical study of works by Aeschylus, Euripides, Chekhov, Dostoevsky, Kafka, Nabakov, Philip Roth, and Milan Kundera as well as the poetry of Dylan Thomas and Wallace Stevens. Critical theories of Nietzsche, Roland Barthes, and Jacques Derrida are used. (Not recommended for first-year students.)
  • PHIL 233: Philosophy of Sport
    This course will consider a host of philosophical issues that arise as one ponders sport in general and sports in particular, ranging from definitional questions (e.g., what is a sport?), through general value theory (e.g., is sport valuable, and if so, in what way or ways - and to whom?), to questions of applied ethics and public policy (e.g., what is the justification, if any, for allowing athletes to shorten their life expectancies - sometimes quite dramatically - for the sake of glory or pay or both?). Although many of the questions we will consider may seem simple at first - what for example, is the significance of winning, if any? - on reflection they reveal themselves to be deep and puzzling. The course will thus provide us with a concrete gate through which to access thorny philosophical questions about the nature of - and the complex interplay among - luck, effort, desert, intention, and result.
  • PHIL 235: Philosophy & 1960s Popular Culture
    This course offers a demanding tour through the intellectual milieu of the 1960s in the United States. We will read philosophical works, social theory, popular and literary fiction, and occasional pieces of various sorts (speeches, journalism, etc.); we will watch films and television shows; we will listen to music: all with the goal of figuring out not just how people in the 1960s were thinking, but also of understanding how philosophy and popular culture reflected and refracted each other during a particular - and particularly volatile - historical moment.
    AMER 237
  • PHIL 240: Philosophy of Law
    Survey of some main philosophical theories about the nature and justification of law, with intensive examination of several key philosophical problems as they arise in workings of the American legal system. Readings drawn from law and philosophy. (Not recommended for first-year students.)
  • PHIL 245: Philosophy of Humans and Animals
    Western philosophers since Aristotle - at least - have claimed that human beings, as a species and alone among species, are capable of complex reasoning. From that premise, they have inferred a wide range of ethical and religious claims, e.g., it is ethically permissible to eat non-human animals. Alternative claims, however, have just as long a history, and in the last twenty or so years there has been a boom in the study of non-human animals and the relationships between humans and non-human animals. Not open to students who have taken Phil 420: Philosophy of Humans and Animals.
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  • PHIL 250: Philosophy of Religion
    This course is an introduction to the philosophy of religion. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of religious experience, ritual, prayer, and sacred books in articulating the idea of God. Course includes a philosophical encounter with mysticism as well as the more traditional metaphysical formulations of the divine, in both the West and East. The critical concern of a variety of rational skepticisms will also be examined.
    RELG 250
  • PHIL 253: Philosophy of Self: East and West
    The course will examine how great thinkers from East and West, ancient and modern times, have tackled the relation between reason, passion, and desire. We will study Plato's tripartite model of the soul, the Stoic monism, especially Chrysippus' theory of desire, and various Eastern concepts such as self-overcoming, unselfing, and self-forgetting. We will also include some basic readings from the scientific discussions on mirror neurons and Antonio Damasio's writings on self and emotion. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ASIA 253, IREL 283
  • PHIL 255: Philosophy and European Film
    This course explores the philosophical content of contemporary European movies with special emphasis on metaphysical, ethical, and aesthetic ideas developed and visually presented by recognized filmmakers including Ingmar Bergman, Akira Kurosawa, Satyajit Ray, Luis Bunuel, Francois Truffaut, DeSica, Erich Rohmer, Fellini, and Antonioni, and special emphasis on Krzysztof Kieslowski.
    CINE 255
  • PHIL 256: Philosophy and American Film
    This course explores the philosophical content of contemporary American film with special emphasis on post-World War II ideas about human freedom, subjectivity, sex and love, and the problem of evil. Film makers include Stanley Kubrick, Woody Allen, Billy Wilder, Orson Welles, Robert Altman, Coen Brothers, David Lynch, Clint Eastwood and Quentin Tarantino.
  • PHIL 258: Spike Lee and Black Aesthetics
    As one of the greatest filmmakers of all time, Spike Lee is both loathed and loved. His films challenge the stereotypes and paternalistic assumptions about African Americans that have become sacrosanct in America's popular imagination. We will explore how the aesthetic representation of race, class, and gender in Spike Lee's filmography have helped create a new genre of film called African American noir. In so doing, we will watch several of Spike Lee's films, documentary projects, and television ads. Ultimately, our goal will be to appreciate Lee's cinematic technique, examine his critique of white supremacy, and consider the cultural and historical events that have shaped his artistic vision. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    AFAM 258, CINE 258
  • PHIL 260: Aesthetics
    A consideration of beauty and the nature and purpose of art and aesthetic judgment, through the theories of Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Hegel, Freud, and others. Artworks in different media and historical periods will be used as occasions for reflection.
  • PHIL 265: Symbolic Logic

  • PHIL 270: American Philosophy
    American philosophy has a rich and diverse history. With the sometimes conflicting commitments to principles and pragmatism as a focus, the course will investigate topics such as (1) early debates over American political institutions: human rights and democracy versus aristocratic leanings to ensure good government; (2) eighteenth-century idealism (e.g., Royce) and transcendentalism (focusing on moral principle, as reflected in Emerson and Thoreau); (3) American pragmatism in its various forms (Pierce, James, and Dewey); (4) Whitehead and process philosophy; and (5) contemporary manifestations (e.g., human rights, environmental concerns, technology, and struggles with diversity).
    AMER 269
  • PHIL 271: African American Philosophy
    African-American philosophy can be defined in two ways: (1) wide-ranging philosophical work done by Americans of recent black African descent and (2) philosophical work on the lived experience of Americans of recent black African descent. We will primarily read philosophers whose philosophical work emphasizes the African-American experience. Thematically, the course will be guided by one overriding question: Given the historical reality of the Atlantic Slave Trade, the Three-Fifths Compromise, the anti-miscegenation laws, the Fugitive Slave Law, Lynch Law, and the Jim Crow laws, among many other inhumane practices, how does the experience of Africans in America constitute a unique combination of philosophical perspectives? Once we answer this question, we will understand how the African-American experience has created a new tradition in Western philosophy. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement.)
    AFAM 271
  • PHIL 272: Currents in Latin American Thought
    Taking a historical perspective, the course will examine important themes in Latin American thought such as philosophical anthropology (race, the nature of the human being, and Latin American character), the study of values (subjectivism versus objectivism), and debates about philosophy and history (universalist versus culturalist approaches, free will versus determinist outlooks). (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    LNAM 272, IREL 282
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  • PHIL 275: Desire and Discipline: Asian Morals
    This course offers a focused historical narrative of the development of Asian moral thinking. It shows, at its early phase, how a particular moral philosopher's thinking (such as Mencius and Xun-zi) is largely determined by his thinking on human nature. However, in later periods, particularly after the importation of Buddhism, the debates on human nature are replaced by an intense cognitive and metaphysical interest in the human mind. Moral cultivation begins to focus less on following moral rules but more on cultivating the mind. The effect of this nature-mind shift on Asian moral thinking is both historically profound and theoretically surprising. Readings: Confucius, Mencius, Xun-zi, Lao zi, Zhuang zi, Zhang Zai, Chen Brothers, Zhu Xi and D. T. Suzuki. (Meets the GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ASIA 275, IREL 285
  • PHIL 276: Social Justice and Human Rights
    Examination of the concepts and debates surrounding social justice and human rights, with attention to the arguments between East and West. Applications to current global and domestic issues, such as globalization; poverty and disparities in wealth and opportunity; race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation; political liberties; and genocide.
    ETHC 276, IREL 286
  • PHIL 277: Social Justice versus Freedom?
    Examination of the perceived tensions between efforts to promote social justice and guarantees of individual freedom. Theoretical debates will be linked to practical issues, such as promotion of free markets versus government social programs and questions of government's legitimate role on personal issues, such as providing for gay marriage. Efforts to seek common ground will be explored. No prerequisites.
    ETHC 277, IREL 287
  • PHIL 280: Dialogue
    Examination of special topics not offered in regular courses.
  • PHIL 281: Evol Institut Values: LFC 1857-2007
    Collaborative research project culminating in a report on the evolution of the College's values from its inception to 2007. Investigations will examine visions of what should be taught and why, who should be taught and why, the identity of the College, its relationship to changing visions of higher education, and its place in the values debates of the broader community. Participation by invitation.
  • PHIL 285: Topics in Japanese Thought
    The course focuses on the Japanese understanding of nature, life, and history. We will focus on the ideas of fragility, impermanence, and beauty. Students will learn the central ideas of Zen Buddhism. Topics to be covered may include artistic representations in Noh plays, Tea ceremonies, and the Samurai culture. Prerequisite: any course in Asian thought or permission of the instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement).
    ASIA 285, IREL 288
  • PHIL 290: Ancient Greek Philosophy
    The nature of reality, knowledge, goodness, and beauty traced from the pre-Socratics through Plato and Aristotle. Some attention may be given to the transition to the medieval period.

    CLAS 290
  • PHIL 291: Descartes to Kant
    Seventeenth- and eighteenth-century European philosophers, with a primary focus on epistemology and metaphysics, including the essence of the mind and its relation to the body. Readings will include Descartes, Spinoza, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. No prerequisites.
    NEUR 291
  • PHIL 292: Hegel to Nietzsche
    Idealism, romanticism, existentialism, vitalism, and pragmatism. Intensive readings in Hegel, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Bergson, James, Husserl, and Freud. Prerequisites: Philosophy 110, 290, and/or 291, or consent of the instructor.
  • PHIL 294: Philosophy of Language
    No pre-requisite is required, but logic is strongly recommended as a gateway for this course. The course will give a general survey of the main issues in philosophy of language of the twentieth century, including questions concerning the relations between meaning and truth, meaning and reference, language and thought, and meaning and meaningfulness. It will introduce some basic concepts and analytical apparatus in the three main branches of language study: semantics, syntax and pragmatics. Reading materials will cover writings by Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, Austin, Quine, Davidson, and Kripke.
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  • PHIL 296: Philosophy of Mind
    With the rise of Cognitive Science, Computer Science, and Neuroscience, questions about the nature of mind have become increasingly important, and in the last 40 years much work on philosophy of mind has been done in analytic philosophy. The class will begin with an examination of some of the most influential texts in philosophy of mind from the last 50 years, and then proceed to current topics. Central questions may include: What is the relationship between the mind and the brain? Is it possible to offer explanations of mental states by reducing them to biological, chemical, or physical states? Can human consciousness be best explained in terms of a computer model? Is it possible to describe the functioning of human thought in terms of a rule-based system of processing?
    NEUR 296
  • PHIL 301: Romantic Comedies & Phil of Love
    (Romantic Comedies and Philosophy of Love) Why do we like to watch romantic comedies? What's satisfying about them, even when they're not great films? Film theorist Leo Braudy claimed that 'genre [film] ? always involves a complex relation between the compulsions of the past and the freedoms of the present. ? [They] affect their audience ? by their ability to express the warring traditions in society and the social importance of understanding convention.' In this course, following Braudy, we will investigate the relationship between the film genre of romantic comedy and age-old thinking about love, marriage, and romance. We'll read some ancient and modern philosophy of love, as well as some relevant film theory, and watch and discuss an array of romantic comedies, trying to unpack what we really believe about love. Prerequisite: One Philosophy course or permission of the instructor. ('Genre: The Conventions of Connection,' Film Theory and Criticism, eds. Leo Braudy and Marshall Cohen. New York: Oxford U. Press, 538).
    GSWS 301, CINE 301
  • PHIL 302: Philos Issues in Documentary Film
    (Philosophical Issues in Documentary Film) What is a documentary film? What does it mean for a movie to be 'non-fiction'? In this course, we will view and discuss a number of documentary films, e.g., those of Robert Flaherty, Leni Riefenstahl, Claude Lanzmann, Albert Maysles, Erroll Morris, and Seth Gordon. We'll also read some aesthetic and film theory, to try to understand what about these films is and is not 'true,' 'good' or 'beautiful.' Prerequisite: One Philosophy course or permission of the instructor.
    CINE 302
  • PHIL 303: Gender and Character
    Studies of the effects of either femininity or masculinity on moral and aesthetic choices. Several philosophers of character, morality, and psychology, e.g., Aristotle, Nietzsche, Freud, MacIntyre, and Gilligan, will be examined in conjunction with various works of fiction and film. Prerequisite: One philosophy course or permission of the instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    GSWS 303
  • PHIL 305: Comp Philosophy: East & West
    Comparative investigation of Eastern and Western philosophical sources; elucidation and critical examination of fundamental presuppositions, unique conceptual formulations, and alternative approaches to general philosophical issues. Prerequisite: One Western philosophy course and one Asian area course, or consent of the instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ASIA 305, IREL 385
  • PHIL 310: Communication Ethics
    Examination of the ethical components at the heart of human communication. Discussions of practical issues, such as free speech, advertising, and privacy, will be based on theoretical investigations of both communication and ethics. Prerequisite: One course in philosophy or permission of the instructor.
  • PHIL 315: Soc Ethics Energy Production & Use
    Course description: the course will explore the ethical implications of possible future energy initiatives. Emphasis will be given to the global implications of interdependency on primary resources and the technological initiatives of nuclear power and alternative sources. Students will focus on independent research projects, with both domestic and international components, surrounding the environmental, social, and ethical issues of future energy production and use. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor.
    SOAN 315, ES 315
  • PHIL 320: Phenomenol, Existent, Deconstruc
    (Phenomenology, Existentialism, and Deconstruction) Twentieth-century continental philosophy, moving from the primacy of lived existence to the problematics of texts. Readings in Husserl, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, Buber, Barthes, Derrida, Levinas, Irigaray, and Lyotard. Prerequisite: Two philosophy courses.
  • PHIL 322: Religious Existentialism
    An epoch of European philosophy and religious thought culminated in the great system developed by Hegel. In its wake came a literature of protest, beginning with the Danish philosopher and religious thinker Soren Kierkegaard and moving through a later generation of European intellectuals who came to maturity between the two world wars. Included are Jewish voices such as Martin Buber and Franz Rosenzweig as well as Christian writers such as Paul Tillich and Gabriel Marcel. Readings include texts by these religious existentialists. Prerequisite: Any Religion course or permission of instructor.
    RELG 322
  • PHIL 325: Major Ethical Theories
    Investigation of principal Western theories of ethics. Issues include the foundation of morality in reason or sentiments, the fundamental principles of morality, the relationship of morality to character, and the demands of morality on human action. Readings from philosophers such as Aristotle, Mill, Kant, Noddings, and MacIntyre. Prerequisite: Two philosophy courses.
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  • PHIL 330: History and Philosophy of Slavery
    This course considers arguments for and against the existence of God, as well as the resources and methods those arguments use. We will consider questions such as: how could one demonstrate that God does or does not exist? What would constitute 'proof' of such a claim? How are faith and reason working for similar or opposed ends in such arguments? What does the character of arguments for or against God's existence say about human life and thought? To address these questions, we will consider ancient, medieval, and modern theologians and philosophers. Prerequisite: RELG 212 or permission of instructor.
    AFAM 330
  • PHIL 352: Topics in Social Justice
    Examination of a particular issue in social justice, through a research project. Common elements of the course will include examinations of theoretical issues and debates, allowing students to select from a range of possible research topics. Significant time will be devoted to periodic student reports on their projects. Prerequisite: Ethics Center/Philosophy 276 or 277 or permission of instructor.
  • PHIL 355: Wittgenstein & Analytic Tradition
    This course will provide students with a background in the analytic tradition, the philosophical outlook that has dominated Anglo-American schools for much of the twentieth century. Readings may include authors: Frege, Moore, Russell, Ayer, Wittgenstein, Strawson, Grice, Austin, Davidson, Kripke, Ryle, Quine, and Searle. Prerequisite: Philosophy 292 is strongly recommended.
  • PHIL 360: Identity & Dreams
    In this course we will explore philosophical issues of personal identity arising particularly from the phenomenon of dreaming. We will focus on the issue of how different dream interpreting techniques help give rise to different perceptions of personhood and one's relation to the world at large. We will read the Bible, Herodotus, Plato, Descartes, Hobbes, Locke, Freud, Jung, and some ancient Chinese documents. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • PHIL 365: Race, Gender & Sexual Orientation
    In this class we will examine a number of questions concerning the reality, or metaphysics, of social identities. When people speak of race, are they referring to something biological or something social? Are the gender roles of men and women shaped more by genetic forces or social forces? Is there a 'gay gene'? Does sexual orientation have a genetic basis? After examining recent literature on the metaphysics of social kinds, we will examine the recent debates surrounding the nature of race, gender, and sexual orientation. Possible readings will include: Foucault, Searle, Hacking, DuBois, Appiah, Taylor, Sundstrom, Butler, and Longino. Prerequisite: at least one philosophy class or instructor's permission. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • PHIL 380: Topics

  • PHIL 410: Major Philosophers
    (Spring 2014 Major Philosophers: Nietzsche) Nietzsche's influence on the present age is undeniable. Chaim Weizmann, the first President of Israel, wrote the following to his wife in 1902: 'I am sending you Nietzsche: learn to read and understand him. This is the best and the finest thing I can send you.' The composer Richard Strauss named his symphonic poem after Nietzsche's Thus Spoke Zarathustra. Even Freud reluctantly acknowledged his debt to the German philosopher. This course will examine the philosophical, religious, and literary influences on Nietzsche's thought as well as his affirmative response and alternative to traditional morality. Some of the key questions we will answer include: What is the doctrine of the 'will to power'? Who or what is an Übermensch? What is the eternal recurrence of the same?
  • PHIL 420: Plato: Eros, Sexuality, & Memory
    Fall 2016 Topic: Plato: Eros, Sexuality, & Memory. This course offers an in-depth look into Plato's concept of eros and his understanding of culture as a pursuit of knowledge, as the dynamic, communicative exchanges between equal and reciprocating citizens. A key topic has to do with the issue of memory (the vehicle of cultural transmissions) and the multifaceted impact on human condition from the proliferation of mnemotechnologies, such as writing (for Plato) and internet (for us). The general concern is quite basic: how shall we live and how shall we adapt to the world of iPhones and internet. Our focus will be on Plato's Phaedrus and Symposium, along with essays from other perspectives, such as those by Joseph Ledoux (a neuroscientist of the memory of fear) and Larry Squire (a memory psychologist), as well as excerpts from French philosophers Bernard Stiegler and Derrida.
  • PHIL 490: Sr Symposium & Research Project
    Independent research plus discussions of that research in meetings of seniors and faculty. (Students undertaking a research project over two semesters would register for regular research project credit in the semester without the symposium.) Open to senior majors and others with permission of the department chair.
  • PHIL 495: Sr Symposium and Thesis
    Senior thesis project plus discussions of that research in meetings of seniors and faculty. (Students writing a thesis over two semesters would register for regular thesis credit in the semester without the symposium.) Open to senior majors.
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  • PHYS 106: Light, Sound, and Waves
    The behavior of waves, including water, sound, radio, and light. Optics of lenses and mirrors. Lasers and holography. Musical instruments. Three hours of lecture per week; no laboratory.
  • PHYS 107: Chance, Fate and Law
    The development of ideas about causality, space, and time and the three revolutions that have changed these concepts: Newton's classical mechanics, Einstein's theory of relativity, and Heisenberg's uncertainty relation. The first two support, whereas the third undermines, the belief that every event is determined to be the way it is by a rigid network of cause and effect. Three hours of lecture per week; no laboratory.
  • PHYS 109: Astronomy
    The solar system and planetary motion, the nature and evolution of stars, star clusters, and galaxies, and the structure and origin of the universe. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week.
  • PHYS 110: Introductory Physics I
    The first half of elementary physics without calculus. Kinematics and Newton's laws of motion for translations and rotations. Conservation principles of energy, momentum, and angular momentum. Oscillations and waves. Three hours of lecture and one laboratory per week. Uses algebra and trigonometry. (Credit may not be earned in both Physics 110 and 120.)
  • PHYS 111: Introductory Physics II
    The second half of elementary physics without calculus. Charge and electric fields; current and magnetic fields. Flux and potential. Circuit elements. Electromagnetic waves. Geometric and wave optics. Three hours of lecture and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: Physics 110. (Credit may not be earned in both Physics 111 and 121.)
  • PHYS 120: General Physics I
    The first half of elementary physics using calculus. This is the most appropriate first course for students majoring in the physical sciences. Kinematics and Newton's laws of motion for translations and rotations. Conservation principles for energy, momentum, and angular momentum. Oscillations and waves. Three hours of lecture and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite or corequisite: Mathematics 110. (Credit may not be earned in both Physics 120 and 110.)
  • PHYS 121: General Physics II
    The second half of elementary physics using calculus. This is the most appropriate second course for students majoring in the physical sciences. Charge and electric fields; current and magnetic fields. Flux and potential. Circuit elements. Electromagnetic waves. Geometric and wave optics. Three hours of lecture and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: Physics 120. Prerequisite or corequisite: Mathematics 111. (Credit may not be earned in both Physics 121 and 111.)
  • PHYS 210: Modern Physics
    Introduction to the special theory of relativity and the elements of quantum theory. Theoretical and experimental investigations of atomic, nuclear, and particle physics. Atomic spectra, X-ray spectra, Compton scattering, nuclear counting techniques, half-life measurements, and neutron activation. Three hours of lecture and one laboratory per week. Prerequisites: Physics 121 (or 111) and Mathematics 111 or permission of the instructor.
  • PHYS 240: Electronics
    Methods of circuit analysis. Transistors, diodes, integrated circuits, and their application in electronic circuits. Amplifiers, oscillators, logic circuits, and computing circuits. Electronic instruments and measurements. Three hours of lecture and one laboratory per week. Prerequisites: Physics 121 ( or 111) and Mathematics 111 or permission of the instructor. (Offered in alternate years.)
  • PHYS 250: Analytical Mechanics
    The study of classical mechanics using mathematics at an intermediate level. Mechanics of single particles, systems of particles, gravity and planetary motion, rigid bodies, vibrations, and non-inertial reference frames. Four hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: Physics 120 (or 110) and Mathematics 210.
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  • PHYS 260: Optics
    Geometric and wave optics at an intermediate level. Topics include interference, diffraction, scattering, polarization, and absorption. Matrix methods. Applications of lasers. Three hours of lecture and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: Physics 121 (or 111) and Mathematics 111. (Offered in alternate years.)
  • PHYS 310: Electricity & Magnetism I
    Electrostatics and magnetostatics. Specific problems involve the electric fields and potentials from constant arrangements of charge, the behavior of dielectric materials, the magnetic fields from steady currents, and the nature of magnetic materials. Four hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Physics 121 (or 111), 250, and Mathematics 210. (Offered in alternate years.)
  • PHYS 311: Electricity & Magnetism II
    Electrodynamics: the transport of energy and momentum by electromagnetic fields. The complete forms of Maxwell's equations are used to describe electromagnetic waves in vacuum and in linear or conducting materials, and to calculate the energy radiated from accelerating charges. An advanced treatment of the Special Theory of Relativity may be a concluding topic. Three hours of lecture and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: Physics 310 and Mathematics 210. (Offered in alternate years.)
  • PHYS 320: Mathematical Methods
    Applied mathematics for scientists. Topics typically include series approximations to functions, matrices and eigenvectors, vector analysis, special functions, ordinary and partial differential equations, orthogonal polynomials, asymptotic techniques, boundary value problems, and numerical methods. Four hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Physics 121 (or 111) and Mathematics 210. May be taken as a tutorial.
  • PHYS 330: Thermodynamics
    The fundamental ideas of temperature, heat, entropy, and equilibrium; the laws of thermodynamics. Macroscopic, phenomenological approach to thermodynamics, followed by the microscopic, statistical description. Kinetic theory. Applications to gases, solids, and chemical systems. Four hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Physics 210 and Mathematics 210 or permission of the instructor. (Offered in alternate years.)
  • PHYS 410: Advanced Analytical Mechanics
    Emphasis on using generalized coordinates and the Principle of Least Action. Newtonian, Lagrangian, Hamiltonian, and Hamilton-Jacobi formulations of mechanics. Four hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Physics 250 and Mathematics 210. May be taken as a tutorial.
  • PHYS 420: Quantum Mechanics I
    Formal development of the quantum theory. The theory is applied to simple systems for which exact solutions are known. These include single-electron atoms, harmonic oscillators, and systems with intrinsic spin. Four hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Physics 210 and 250 and Mathematics 210. (Offered in alternate years.)
  • PHYS 421: Quantum Mechanics II
    Applications of the quantum theory. Approximation methods, such as perturbation theory, variational techniques, and numerical methods allow the quantum theory to be used for complex systems. Examples are multi-electron atoms, atoms in external electromagnetic fields, molecules, and solids. Four hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Physics 420 and Mathematics 210. (Offered in alternate years.)
  • PHYS 480: Experimental Methods
    Seminar on techniques that illustrate principles and methods of contemporary physics. Typical experiments are subatomic resonance (NMR and ESR), X-ray phenomena (Moseley's Law, etc.), optical pumping, determination of band gaps in semiconductors, shot noise, Johnson noise, spectroscopy of atoms and molecules, and laser spectroscopy. Students write formal reports and present seminar talks about experiments. Two seminars and one laboratory per week. Prerequisites: Physics 420 and Mathematics 210. (Meets GEC Senior Studies Requirement. Offered in alternate years.)

 

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  • POLS 110: Introduction to Global Politics
    This course is an introduction to the main concepts and theories of comparative politics and international relations. Students investigate the democratic and non-democratic political systems and current political issues across the developed and developing worlds; war and peace; prosperity and poverty; and the political ideologies that have shaped politics within and among nations in the modern era.
    IREL 140
  • POLS 120: Introduction to American Politics
    Origins of the American political system, basic institutions, political parties and interest groups, and evolution of constitutional interpretation.
    AMER 119
  • POLS 130: Great Political Ideas
    What is a person's place within a larger community? How ought we to organize our societies to create peace and/or justice? These are the fundamental questions political theorists ask. This course is an introduction to basic concepts of political thought, as well as a review of some major thinkers in political theory, both ancient and modern. Emphasis is on learning to read theoretical texts and interpreting them. Course readings are likely to include works by Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Tocqueville, Marx, Mill, and others.
  • POLS 200: Methods of Political Research
    This course introduces students to the nuts and bolts of systematic political science research. Students learn how to construct a research question - and develop and test hypotheses. Students apply concepts and strategies learned in class to develop their own research design. The course will also expose students to: basic quantitative and qualitative skills for the purposes of describing and explaining political phenomena, and the analysis of data on issues in American and global politics. Prerequisite: Politics or International Relations major, or consent of instructor.
    IREL 249
  • POLS 210: Politics of Europe
    This course is a survey of the domestic political institutions, cultures, and economies of select European countries, as well as the major public policy issues facing the advanced industrial democracies of Western Europe, the new democracies of Central and Eastern Europe, and the continent's last autocracies (e.g., Russia). Some consideration is also given to pan-European governance, such as the European Union (EU) and the European Court of Human Rights.
    IREL 250
  • POLS 213: Non-Violence and Politics of Change
    We will begin the course by examining the origins of non-violence as a political philosophy. For the remainder of the semester we will compare movements including India's successful bid for independence under Gandhi and Nehru, the Civil Rights Movement in the United States, the Color Revolutions in Eastern Europe, and the recent non-violent revolutions sweeping across Tunisia, Egypt and other parts of the Arab world. We will also briefly cover movements that have had significant non-violent strands but incorporated or were impeded by violence (e.g. South Africa, Kyrgyzstan, and the Tiananmen Square Protests).
  • POLS 215: Asian Politics
    We will study the political systems of countries in East, South, and Southeast Asia today and the international relations of Asia since the end of the Cold War. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    IREL 255
  • POLS 216: Politics of Middle East
    Study will focus on issues of modernization; the nature of Middle East governments; the past and present impact of religion on the region's culture and socio-political system; the Arab-Israeli conflict and its implications for world peace; and the impact of oil on the economy and regime stability in the Persian Gulf region. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ISLM 216, IREL 256
  • POLS 217: African Politics
    A survey of the geography, social and political history, and postindependent politics of Black Africa. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    AFAM 219, IREL 257
  • POLS 218: Politics of Russia
    The course will investigate the domestic political processes, institutions, and economies of the Russian Federation and the other states in the post-Soviet Union. Additionally, the course examines Russia's foreign policy, paying close attention to the Russian Federation's actions toward its close neighbors. Prerequisites: POLS 110 or permission of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    IREL 251
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  • POLS 219: Politics of Latin America
    An introduction to politics and social change in Latin America. Study will focus on several Latin American countries and on special topics such as human rights, religion, the military, land reform, women, and population policy. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    LNAM 219, IREL 259
  • POLS 220: Political Parties
    American parties, pressure groups, and electoral problems.
  • POLS 221: The Presidency
    The president is the symbolic leader of the federal government but, compared to Congress, the framers of the U.S. Constitution intended the executive to be the weaker branch of the national government. This course examines the growth and accumulation of presidential power and the implications of a strong executive for domestic politics and America's foreign relations. It also considers relations between the institution of the presidency and the courts, the media, and the people.
    AMER 221
  • POLS 222: Congress
    A glance at the enumerated powers granted the legislative branch under the U.S. Constitution suggests Congress is the strongest of the three branches of the national government. Yet the power of Congress is divided between two chambers, and the vast majority of legislation proposed in either chamber never becomes law. Congress is supposed to represent the interests of the people of the various states - and yet its public standing is nowadays at an historic low. This course examines the basic operations, structure, power dynamics, and politics of the U.S. House of Representatives and the Senate. It also considers the rivalry and relationship between Congress and the President.
    AMER 222
  • POLS 224: Mass Media and American Politics
    An analysis of the influence of the mass media on American political institutions and American attitudes. Topics include First Amendment issues, political campaigns, political movements, public opinion, advertising, and entertainment.
    AMER 225
  • POLS 225: Influence and Interest Groups
    Organized interests shape American campaigns and candidates, citizen attitudes, and policy at every level of government; the power of these groups lies in their numbers, their dollars and their organization. This course introduces the intellectual traditions and debates that have characterized the study of interest groups and their influence on public policy, political opinion, and political actors, and will compare theory to practice in the American political experience.
    AMER 242
  • POLS 226: Public Policy Studies
    This course focuses on how public officials address policy problems, and why they select the solutions they do. We examine the public policymaking process, paying particular attention to the role played by political actors (elected officials, interest groups, governmental agencies) seeking to influence the tone and direction of policy. Attention will also be paid to how particular policy issues and problems gain (or fail to gain) the public's attention, including the role that political elites and the media play in agenda setting. Finally, the course assesses the effects of public polices on citizens' lives. In doing so, students will assume the role of "policy analyst," learning how to write briefs in which they evaluate various policy reforms. In sum, students will gain the necessary tools to systematically assess when a public policy is achieving its desired goals and whether it is being implemented effectively and efficiently. Prerequisite: POLS 110 or POLS 120.

  • POLS 227: Campaigns and Elections
    This course examines the nomination procedures and election of political candidates focusing on Congressional & Presidential campaigns. Specifically, we will study the role of political parties, interest groups, race, gender, public opinion, the media, and electoral reform in political campaigns and elections.
  • POLS 228: Amer Founding&Popular Sovereignty
    As familiar as these opening words of the Preamble of the U.S. Constitution may sound to us, they have inspired a great deal of debate about how best to institutionalize 'the rule of the people.' Through an examination of classic texts and debates from the U.S. founding to the present, we will seek to refine our understanding of the ideal of popular sovereignty by focusing in depth on the American political experience. Topics to be covered include representation, federalism, and constitutional revision.
  • POLS 230: Religion and Politics
    This course examines the complex social, historical, and intellectual forces that impact the relationships between religion and politics. Students begin by exploring the historical genealogy of Western ideas about the proper role of religion in the public square. We draw from various theoretical approaches in order to better understand particular conflict situations such as contemporary U.S. political debates on the role of religion in policy-making; the tension between Islam and democracy in Turkey; the head scarf debate in France; and the actions of Christian and Buddhist monks during the Vietnam War. We will critically reflect on the role of religious ideologies as well as the ways in which religious explanations of politics and violence can obscure more enduring histories of power relations. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    RELG 230, IREL 267
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  • POLS 233: Chicago Politics
    This course is an introduction to Chicago politics. We will focus on contemporary relationships among business, labor, environmentalists, and other social groups, including those groups based on ethnicity, race, and sexual identity. We will examine the mobilization of and current relations between major political players and interest groups. Students will also explore important historical elements of Chicago politics such as the Daley family and the rise of the Democratic Machine or the election of Harold Washington and the ensuing 'council wars.'
  • POLS 234: Urban Politics
    This course examines problems of political and social organization in central cities. Topics include political machines, mayors, public policy issues, race & politics, and racial coalition politics. (Not open to students who have completed POLS 223.)
  • POLS 235: Race & Gender in American Politics
    In this course we will explore the complex relationship between race and gender in the American political process. How do underrepresented racial groups and women attain legislative success? What role does identity politics play in influencing voter decisions? We will examine how race and gender affect political behavior, public policy, American political culture, and the overall political landscape. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement.)
  • POLS 236: Religion and Politics in the USA
    This course focuses on the ways religion has been a source of political division and unity in America. Polls indicate that America is, by far, the most religious of industrial democracies and that our contentious political debates are, in large part, due to the religious dimensions of morally evocative issues like abortion and gay marriage, and the firm positions of such constituencies as the Christian Right and new Religious Left. Historically, public debates concerning abolition, suffrage and temperance drew on scholarly and legal interpretations of the Constitutional promise of both religious freedom and the separation of church and state. We will examine the role of religion in the founding of the American republic, and in contemporary political movements such as Black Lives Matter, the Federation for Immigration Reform, 21st century civil rights organizations with concerns ranging from prison reform to the environment, and the 2016 U.S. Presidential election. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    RELG 200, AMER 220
  • POLS 237: Environmental Politics and Policy
    This course provides an overview of environmental politics and policy in the United States, with an emphasis on the ways in which policies are developed and implemented at the local, state, and national levels. Special attention is paid to the diversity of actors that shape environmental outcomes, including legislators, administrators, the science community, civil society, and the private sector. This course examines environmental politics and policy in the United States from the roots of environmental policymaking present at the country's founding through the emergence of the "modern" environmental movement in the post-World War II era that led to the raft of environmental legislation we have today. No prerequisites.
    ES 236
  • POLS 238: Jane Addams
    (Jane Addams: Pacifist, Global Peace Activist.) Nobel Peace Prize laureate and Chicagoan Jane Addams is remembered for her tireless efforts at radical social reform in late nineteenth century and early twentieth century America. This course is a survey of the ideas that shaped Addams' pacifism, as well as her activism ? in Chicago, throughout the United States, and abroad ? to end the First World War, keep the United States out of the war, and see to it that the post-war settlement produced a lasting and just peace. The course explores Addams' ideas about world peace and activities to achieve it. Students conduct archival research related to Addams' pacifism, feminism, and progressivism and design and create content for a webpage on this topic. This course is affiliated with Digital Chicago: Unearthing History and Culture, a digital humanities grant at Lake Forest College funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. No prerequisites.
    GSWS 238
  • POLS 239: Chicago: Local and Global
    Chicago is a global and a 'local' city. On the one hand, the city is involved in manufacturing, trade, and services on a worldwide basis. On the other hand, Chicago is a city of neighborhoods, often based on strong ethnic and racial identities. The course examines the city's dual quality by studying the interconnections between the world economy and the daily life of Chicagoans. A key connection is immigration, which we shall explore from the standpoint of several important communities, including, most prominently, Hispanics/Latinos, as well as African-Americans, Eastern Europeans, and Asians. The course will take both an historical and contemporary approach, as we analyze how the city developed economically, politically, and culturally since the late 19th century, as well as how the city is adjusting today in an age of globalization. No prerequisites. Cross-listed in American Studies, Latin American Studies, and serves as an elective for Urban Studies. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    LNAM 202, AMER 226
  • POLS 240: American Foreign Policy
    Students in this course explore the major historical developments and ideologies that have shaped American foreign policy since the founding of the Republic. We also study the models of foreign policy decision-making and the foreign policy institutions of the national government on matters related to war and national security, trade and monetary policy, and the global environment. The role of civil society in foreign policy is also considered. Special emphasis is given to the post- 9/11 era.
    AMER 241, IREL 240
  • POLS 241: Global Issues
    This course is a survey of the contemporary international politics of the great powers (e.g. United States, the European Union, Russia, Japan) and emerging powers (e.g., China, India, Brazil) in relation to contemporary issues in international economic, security, humanitarian, and environmental affairs. Special consideration is given to the implications of China's rise to global power on the U.S.- and Western- dominated international order.
    IREL 241
  • POLS 242: Politics of the Developing World
    This course highlights special topics relating to the domestic and international politics of developing countries, such as delayed industrialization, the lingering impact of colonialism, and recent trends in democratization and economic development and under-development. Recent trends related to the emergence of newly industrialized countries (NICs) are also considered. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    IREL 242
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  • POLS 245: Theories of International Relations
    In this course, students survey the major theoretical models and concepts associated with the study of international relations for the purpose of analyzing and thinking critically about contemporary international political issues.
    IREL 245
  • POLS 248: Obama's Foreign Policy
    Barack Obama entered the White House in 2009 with the ambitious foreign policy goal of reasserting America?s global leadership by strengthening the American and world economies, maintaining America's military might, and reclaiming the country's good standing in the aftermath of the disastrous Second Iraq War. With his presidency is in its final months, it is reasonable to inquire about the administration's foreign policy successes and failures. In this course, students study the origins, conduct, and consequences of Obama's foreign policy choices and the processes by which these choices have been implemented over the past eight years. Particular attention is given to relations with the great powers, China and Russia especially, and "rogue" states, conflict and discord in the Middle East, international economic affairs, and the global environment.
  • POLS 250: American Political Thought
    Students survey American political thought from the Revolutionary Era to the present day (or from the original Boston Tea Party to the contemporary Tea Party movement). Topics to be covered include: revolutionary ideas and their historical antecedents, the framing of the Constitution, 19th century responses to slavery and industrialism, the Progressive Era, and the philosophical underpinnings of contemporary conservatism and liberalism. There are no prerequisites, but either POLS 120 or a previous course in political theory is encouraged.
    AMER 260
  • POLS 251: Family Structure & Political Theory
    Sexuality, child rearing, marriage, and family construction are crucial issues to political theorists, especially since the family is the fundamental social unit. Through an examination of traditional political theorists, this course will explore the treatment of these issues, and how they affect other, more established political problems such as citizenship, property, and community. Current legal and practical problems involving families will inform and illuminate our perusal of political theorists' approach to the relationship between the private family and the state. Readings include selections from the Bible, Sophocles and Aristophanes, Plato and Aristotle, the Gospels, St. Augustine, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Wollstonecraft, Tocqueville, Mill, Engels and others. POLS 130 is recommended but not required. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement)
    GSWS 251
  • POLS 252: Education and Political Power
    Societies and their philosophers have been devoting attention to what and how and by whom children and young adults should be taught since Plato wrote the Republic over 2,000 years ago. Today's debates over feminism, traditionalism, ethnocentrism, religion, etc., in education merely echo what has come before. Past thinkers asked two essential questions: Which members of society should be educated and what do they need to know? Readings include those by Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Locke, Rousseau, Dubois, Washington, Dewey, and others. Prerequisite: POLS 130 is recommended but not required.
  • POLS 260: Introduction to Legal Studies
    Questions of law and justice reflect our most basic human values, drawing on ancient religious and humanistic traditions but adaptable to a modern, post-enlightenment world. This introductory course provides an interdisciplinary curriculum by which students explore the different ways that society uses legal ideas, policies, institutions and processes to pursue justice, order and the allocation of property rights.
  • POLS 261: American Constitutional Law
    This course examines the major constitutional themes of judicial review, federalism, separation of powers, the commerce power, due process rights, and equal protection under the law. Students read U.S. Supreme Court cases in order to analyze and understand the allocation of government power. Prerequisite: POLS 120 or permission of instructor.
    AMER 259
  • POLS 262: American Jurisprudence
    (Jurisprudence: Philosophy of American Law) Students examine the ways Americans have conceptualized and theorized about the law from the time of the Founding to the present day. Topics to be covered include natural law versus legal positivism; the relationships among law, politics, economics, and society; and debates over constitutional and statutory interpretation, the proper role of judges in a democracy, and the relationship between domestic and international law. There are no prerequisites, but either POLS 120 or a previous course in political theory is encouraged.
    AMER 265
  • POLS 266: The Judiciary
    This is an examination of the federal court system, focusing on the United States Supreme Court. Students will study the constitutional beginnings of the federal judicial branch and its position vis a vis the two other branches of government. We will examine the history of the United States Supreme Court, the politics of presidential appointment of judges, selected case law over the course of the Court's history and its impact, personalities on the Court and the Court's decision-making process.
    AMER 268
  • POLS 267: Intro to Criminal Law & Procedure
    This course surveys the essentials of criminal law and procedure, from arrest and trial to appeal. Using a case law approach, supplemented by articles and essays on specific topics of interest, students follow the prosecution and defense of a case. This course examines police and prosecutor conduct, focusing on search and seizure issues, interrogation techniques, identification methods and the constitutional and evidentiary issues that accompany them, and the changing laws of electronic surveillance. It also analyzes defense methods, the use of opening statements and closing arguments as tools of persuasion and sentencing issues, as well as post-trial matters, appeals, post-conviction or habeas corpus reviews of convictions and sentences, and capital punishment and life without parole. Prerequisite: Politics 120 or consent of instructor.
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  • POLS 268: Law, Medicine and Ethics
    In this course, students explore issues that arise at the intersection of law, medicine, and ethics. They study legal and ethical principles and apply them to controversies in medical treatment, medical research, and recent advances in biotechnology. Topics will include informed consent, eugenics, reproductive technologies, gene therapy, and human enhancement. Political implications are also studied. Not open to First-Year Students.
  • POLS 269: Testimony and Trials
    This course will examine how the U.S. Constitution's procedural safeguards in the 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th amendments are effectuated in a court of law. The course will explore how constitutional law and rules of evidence and procedure intersect with concepts of justice and fairness. Students will study the law, the sociology and the philosophy of the trial process.
  • POLS 270: Race and Criminal Justice
    This course will examine the systemic racial injustices inherent in American criminal jurisprudence from police interaction to trial and sentencing, incarceration, and supervised release. Students will study how racial injustice continues to pervade the American criminal justice system despite the constitutional guarantees of equal protection and due process. How do so many players, from police officers to judges and juries, fail to protect against racial injustice? Why do courts, when confronted with allegations or proof of racially motivated police misconduct, overwhelmingly cite "harmless error" doctrine? To attempt to answer these complicated questions, students will learn legal criminal procedure, study 4th, 5th, 6th and 8th amendment case law, and have an opportunity to listen to and speak with a variety of professionals in the criminal justice field. Prerequisite: POLS 120 or permission of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    AFAM 270, AMER 274
  • POLS 275: Security and Liberty
    (International Security and Civil Liberties.) A driver in the contemporary evolution of many areas of law and overarching constitutional culture is the perceived need to protect national security. Most innovations and developments in national security law, however, encroach upon the foundational, individual civil rights enshrined in the very same constitutional system we seek to safeguard. This course will examine the constitutional balance of national security power among the branches of government, the components of the the intelligence/national security state today, and the tensions between its operation and personal rights and liberties. No prior legal knowledge or coursework is required. No prerequisites.
  • POLS 291: Tutorial
    To be arranged individually with an appropriate faculty member.
  • POLS 310: State and Nation-Building
    This seminar focuses on the nature, dynamics, and strategies of state and nation-building processes within the modern international state system. Students will examine the mechanisms utilized to forge and facilitate national consciousness among the fragile, developing post-colonial states of Africa and other Third World countries. Dominant theoretical paradigms and empirical case studies that focus on the salient differences among nation-states, nations in search of states, and states in search of nations will be discussed. Other subjects include the role and relevance of nationalist ideology in our modern world and the causes, mechanisms, and consequences of ethnic conflicts and separatist movements in both developing countries and advanced industrialized states. Prerequisite: POLS 110 or consent of instructor.
  • POLS 311: Political Systems: Islamic World
    About one in four countries have Muslim-majority populations. This course examines the political systems of the Islamic world, which spans the globe from Europe and Africa to Southeast Asia. Students learn about the variety of regime types among these countries, including absolute and constitutional monarchies, one-party republics, theocracies, and Islamic and liberal democracies. Particular attention is given to the role of religion, culture, economic development, and history in the formation and operation of the political orders of these countries. Prerequisite: POLS 110 or consent of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement.)
    ISLM 312, IREL 351
  • POLS 313: Political Islam
    This course examines the interaction of Islam and politics. It begins with an examination of the relationship between Islam and politics in the early history of the Islamic state. It then studies the ways in which Islam is incorporated into Muslim countries today and the various models of contemporary Islam-state relations. The course also examines Islamist movements and parties, and their role in the domestic politics of Muslim countries, including the period of the Arab Spring. Prerequisite: Politics 110 or consent of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement.)
    ISLM 313
  • POLS 314: Islam, State, and Society
    This course examines Islamic theology's guidance for governance and society. Students will evaluate the sources of the religion as well as early Islamic history to better understand the role of religion in the state, society, and family. Students will critically evaluate conventionally held views regarding Islam and Muslims and the treatment of women and minorities according to Islamic sources. Prerequisite: POLS 110. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ISLM 314, IREL 352
  • POLS 315: Comparative Foreign Policy
    Though varied, the foreign policies of countries exhibit similar patterns, as well as analogous restraints and opportunities. Through a comparative analysis, this course surveys case studies of the contemporary foreign policies of great powers (Britain, China, France, Germany, Japan, and Russia) and regional powers (Brazil, India, Iran, South Africa, and Turkey). It analyzes how foreign policy interests are formulated, utilizing a variety of theories that highlight the importance of domestic and international influences on a country's foreign policy choices and behavior. Prerequisite: Politics 110 or consent of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement.)
    IREL 353
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  • POLS 317: Global Democratization
    This course is a thematic and historical study of recent transitions from authoritarian rule to democracy. Students discuss theories of democratization and democratic consolidation, examine the key features of different 'waves' of democratization, and consider how new democracies avoid 'backsliding' to authoritarianism. Students also explore the relationship between democratic systems of government and culture. Prerequisite: POLS 110 or consent of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    IREL 357
  • POLS 318: Topics in Comparative Politics
    This seminar examines selected topics in comparative politics.
  • POLS 322: Campaigns, Elections & Pol Parties
    (Campaigns, Elections, and Political Parties) In this course, students examine the nomination procedures and election of political candidates, with a focus on significant historical campaigns, both congressional and presidential. We also study the role and development of political parties with a particular emphasis on emerging third parties, from a historical and contemporary perspective. The influences of interest groups, race, gender, voting behavior, and the media on our electoral process are also considered. Prerequisite: POLS 120 or the consent of instructor.
    AMER 322
  • POLS 323: Federalism
    This course examines the historical, constitutional, philosophical, and political aspects of American federalism. Students consider both how and why the relationship between the various states and the national government has changed since the founding of the Republic, and the obligations of the states to one another, on a range of matters, including marriage, education, morality laws, eminent domain, and public health. Prerequisite: Politics 120 or consent of instructor.
  • POLS 324: Public Opinion
    This course will offer a broad-based introduction to the factors that motivate citizens' social and political attitudes. We will begin by discussing how we conceptualize and measure public opinion, from where do opinions or attitudes originate, what factors influence citizens' preferences, and whether political elites respond to public opinion when making public policy. We will investigate public opinion on a wide range of political issues, from taxes and government spending to attitudes about racial equality. Finally, we will take up important normative questions including the role that public opinion should or should not play in the American political system. Prerequisite: POLS 120 or permission of instructor.
  • POLS 327: Democracy and Our Schools
    This course examines K-12 education policy through the lens of politics. On the one hand, schools influence American democracy by cultivating norms of civic engagement and political participation among youth. Yet, schools are themselves shaped by democratic politics. As agencies of government, nearly everything about the way schools function is determined through the political process. Consequently, this course considers the causes and consequences of living in a nation that relies on elected officials to govern its schools. We first assess the varied goals and purposes of public schooling. We then examine the formal institutions, interest groups, and ideas that influence American education policy. Key questions include: Does politics compromise equality and for whom? Is education policy more responsive to the needs of some students than others? How much voice should the public have in shaping education policy? Should schools be organized primarily by politics or by markets? Prerequisite: POLS 120.
  • POLS 328: Topics in American Politics
    Seminar examining selected topics on political issues, institutions, or problems such as race and criminal justice. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement, depending on topic.)
  • POLS 342: International Political Economy
    The course introduces students to the academic discipline of International Political Economy (IPE). It surveys the intellectual history of the discipline and specifies the main methodological and theoretical debates in IPE. The course also examines international trade and production, the international monetary and financial systems, and global poverty and development. Prerequisite: Politics 110 or consent of instructor.
    IREL 342
  • POLS 345: Intl Relations of the Middle East
    (International Relations of the Middle East) This course explores the international relations of the Middle East within the larger context of theories of international relations. It provides a conceptual, theoretical and empirical background for the complex interplay of regional and global politics, especially the dynamic interactions of Middle East countries with the United States, Europe, Russia and China. Also considered is the impact of globalization on socio-political structures in the region, and the increasing political role of non-state actors such as religious movements and global satellite channels. Prerequisite: POLS 110 or consent of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement)
  • POLS 346: International Humanitarian Law
    This course explores the development and operation of international humanitarian law, the body of international law that seeks to limit the effects of armed conflict by regulating the means and methods of warfare and by protecting persons not participating in the hostilities. We will discuss key doctrinal features of international humanitarian law--including, e.g., proportionality, military necessity, and the distinction between civilian objects and military objectives--as well as key sources of international humanitarian law, including, e.g., the Conventions of The Hague and Geneva (and their progeny). We will examine the difference between international and non-international armed conflicts, and we will also consider the relationship between international humanitarian law and other areas of international law, such as international human rights law and international criminal law. Prerequisite: POLS 110 or consent of instructor
    IREL 346
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  • POLS 347: International Institutions
    In this course students survey the theories of international institutions, focusing on how they emerge and function, as well as their effect on international relations processes and outcomes. Also central to the course are in-depth case studies of international organizations in the fields of diplomacy, security, economics, environment, law, and humanitarian affairs. Special emphasis is placed on the United Nations system and the European Union. Prerequisite: Politics 110 or consent of instructor.
    IREL 347
  • POLS 348: International Law
    Students in this course investigate the evolution of modern international law. We consider the roles of states, the United Nations, and non-state actors in international law, mechanisms for the creation and enforcement of international legal norms, the changing nature of state sovereignty from the Peace of Westphalia to the present, and breaches of international law and potential consequences. Attention is also given to pressing matters of international concern, including war and terrorism, environmental issues, and human rights and humanitarian law. Prerequisite: POLS 110 or consent of instructor.
    IREL 348
  • POLS 350: Liberty
    The concept of individual liberty is a relatively modern one; its development began with the English Enlightenment. In this course, we will examine liberty as it relates to markets, individual rights, conflicts between equality and freedom, and conflicts between governmental authority and individual freedom. Must markets be completely free in order to claim economic freedom? Does freedom require a government to protect an individual's autonomy? Can there be a balance between individual liberty and communal good? Course readings are likely to include Hobbes, Locke, Smith, Publius, Tocqueville, Marx, Mill, Hayek, Friedman, and Rawls, among others. Pre-requisite: POLS 130 or consent of instructor.
  • POLS 351: Justice and the Law
    Political societies must make all manner of judgments about what is just. We must distribute goods, determine crimes, give punishments, and create legislative districts, all with an eye to some idea of justice. Is justice fairness? Proportional? Equitable? Different political and legal theorists have approached these questions differently. Using both traditional political theory texts and contemporary legal theory, we will explore questions of justice and the law and whether justice can be found within the law or is external to it. Readings include those by Plato, Aquinas, Hobbes, Locke, Thoreau, Mill, King, Rawls, Gunier, and contemporary legal theorists. Prerequisite: POLS 130 or consent of instructor. Not open to students who have already completed POLS 357.
  • POLS 352: Liberalism and Its Critics
    Modern political thought is based on ideas of equality, individuality and individual liberty, private property, and an overall idea of progress. These ideas developed especially in the thinking of Locke, Smith, and Mill. But as modernism grew, so did its critics. The course covers some basic theories of modernism through readings in the liberal tradition. It also considers opposition to liberalism as found in the writings of Burke, Rousseau, Tocqueville, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Marcuse, Arendt, and contemporary anti- and postmodernists. Prerequisite: POLS 130 or consent of instructor.
  • POLS 353: Topics in Political Theory
    (POLS 353 Topics in Political Theory: The Social Contract) Throughout the history of political thought, the metaphor of the social contract, or the idea that the consent of individuals is necessary for the formation of legitimate government, has been widely used to justify and/or criticize certain institutional arrangements. This course will be an examination of this metaphor. We will try to come to terms with both its philosophical appeal as well as its historical relevancy. In addition to reading classic texts of those like Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Rawls, we will also compare the models of these authors with actual processes of constitutional formation including the American Founding.
  • POLS 355: Dictators, Despots, and Tyrants
    This course is an examination of the ideological underpinnings of modern dictatorships, their politics, and how they organize the institutions of the state. It begins with an examination of twentieth century dictatorships, including Nazi Germany, Fascist Italy, Imperial Japan, the Soviet Union, and Communist China. It then considers contemporary dictatorships in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East. Students are introduced to source materials including pamphlets authored by dictators and a variety of films from different genres. The course underscores the political commonalities and differences among dictatorial regimes over time and across regions. It also explores how modern-day dictatorships and their leaders have shown remarkable resilience against the forces of globalization and political liberalization. Prerequisite: POLS 110 or consent of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    IREL 355
  • POLS 358: Democratic Theory
    Almost everyone seems to be in favor of democracy, but there is considerable disagreement about what democracy means and why it might be worthy of our support. In this course, we seek to understand the concept of democracy from a variety of different historical, philosophical, and empirical perspectives. Examples of questions to be covered include: What is the relationship between democracy and the protection of individual rights? How responsive should democratically elected representatives be to their constituents? Are ordinary citizens knowledgeable enough to participate effectively in democratic politics? Prerequisite: Politics 120 or consent of instructor.
  • POLS 361: The First Amendment
    In this course students explore the U.S. Supreme Court's interpretation of freedoms of speech (including obscenity and libel), assembly and association, the press, and the exercise and establishment of religion. We will also examine First Amendment issues raised by regulation of the Internet and other new media. Prerequisite: POLS 120 or consent of instructor. Not open to First-Year Students.
    AMER 360
  • POLS 363: The Fourteenth Amendment
    (The Fourteenth Amendment: Civil Rights and Equality) Students in this course examine the rulings of the United States Supreme Court in order to learn how the Fourteenth Amendment guides the government's treatment of people based on race, creed, national origin, gender, economic status and sexual orientation. State action, strict scrutiny analysis, affirmative action and voting rights are also covered. Prerequisite: POLS 120 or consent of instructor. Not open to First-Year Students. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    AMER 364
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  • POLS 365: Civil Liberties
    This course focuses on our individual liberties as addressed in the Bill of Rights and the Fourteenth Amendment. Using United States Supreme Court cases, we examine the protection of our individual liberties - the meaning of equal protection and the antidiscrimination principle, expressive freedom and the First Amendment, religious liberty and church-state relations, rights of personal autonomy and privacy, criminal justice, voting rights, property rights and economic freedom. Prerequisite: POLS 120 or permission of instructor. Second year standing is also required.
    AMER 366
  • POLS 390: Internship
    To be arranged individually with an appropriate faculty member.
  • POLS 391: Tutorial
    To be arranged individually with an appropriate faculty member.
  • POLS 395: Internship
    Relates theory to practice by placing students in governmental agencies, community interest groups, and other political environments. (Two course credits.)
  • POLS 397: Political Ecology
    Political ecology examines the politics of the environment, exploring ways politics affects the environment and, conversely, the environment politics. This course expands our understanding of politics to examine the roles of human and non-human political actors in environmental change, environmental knowledge acquisition and dissemination, and environmental inequalities. With global inequality as a central concern, we consider topics such as global "villagization" in Tanzania, development projects in India, agrarian reforms in the global south, and effects of land loss on Cajuns, Native Americans, and African-Americans in Southern Louisiana. We also look carefully at the concept of agency and explore how much it is possible to expand our notions of agency to non-human environmental entities, such as animals, plants ecosystems, and genes. Possible topics include cows, cotton, the Mississippi River, and carbon. Prerequisite: Any 200-level course in ES, ENGL, PHIL, or POLS. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ES 362
  • POLS 480: Presidential Power
    (Senior Seminar in American Politics and Law: Presidential Power) Students in this senior seminar explore the growth in executive power relative to the legislative and judicial branches of the federal government. Our examination begins with President Lyndon Johnson and the Vietnam War. It continues with his successor, Richard Nixon, who, according to some people, epitomizes the concentration of executive power. Though Nixon's resignation signals the end of an 'imperial presidency,' under President Reagan the executive branch's consolidation of power is renewed. The experiences of the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s are a backdrop for the study of the expansion of executive power under Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama. Prerequisite: POLS 120 or permission of instructor. Open to Politics majors and minors in the third or fourth year.
  • POLS 481: Revolutions and Global Development
    (Senior Seminar in Global Politics: Revolutions and Global Development) Social movements and political transformations constitute the critical dynamics of the contemporary international system. This senior seminar exposes students to key concepts, theories and empirical case studies in struggles for democracy and resistance against dictatorships in the modern world. We will critically analyze some of the goals of popular uprisings, peasant insurgencies, and popular mass mobilizations, and their effects on the geo-strategic configurations of power among major nation states. Utilizing regional case studies from England, France, Russia, China, Iran, Algeria, South Africa, etc., students will debate the scholarship on social change, economic development, and the imperatives of political democratization in the quest for power and prestige. We will also consider conflict and cooperation in the globally interdependent world system. This course is the capstone experience for fourth year politics and international relations majors.
  • POLS 482: Affirmative Action
    (Senior Seminar in American Politics and Law: Affirmative Action) Affirmative action in employment and education is one of the most controversial issues of our time. As such, it transects many subfields of political science: political theory, American political institutions, elections, law and constitutionalism, public opinion, comparative politics. Affirmative action policies bring to light American attitudes toward race, gender, sexual identity, and ethnicity. The course begins with a study of the foundational legal, ethical and political issues of affirmative action. Students then pursue their own, specialized projects on the topic. Prerequisite: Politics senior or consent of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement.)

  • POLS 483: Democratic Peace & War
    Senior Seminar in Global Politics: Democratic Peace and War. Do liberal democracies conduct their external relations differently than dictatorships? If so, how, why, and to what result? These questions taken together constitute a central focus of international relations scholarship. This course finds its intellectual foundations in Immanuel Kant's thesis that liberal democracies at once enjoy a 'separate peace' amongst themselves and act belligerently toward dictatorships. Students in this senior seminar survey a rich literature on the 'democratic peace' thesis through the lenses of realist, liberal, and constructivist international relations theory, through reference to in-depth case studies and large-scale data analysis. In their seminar papers, students apply these theories and methods to their research on current foreign policies issues among democracies and between democracies and dictatorships.
    Prerequisite: Open to international relations and politics juniors and seniors only.

  • POLS 484: Searches, Seizures, and Security
    (Senior Seminar in American Politics and Law: Searches, Seizures, and Security). The right against government intrusion into our lives is one of our most cherished freedoms found in the Bill of Rights of the United States Constitution. The framers believed that agents of government should not enter private homes or search personal property without justification. Yet now, government entities and corporations have access to our personal information raising questions of how current law, politics, and security issues at home and abroad reshape constitutional boundaries of our right to privacy. This course begins with a study of the Fourth Amendment and constitutional rights and limitations of search and seizure and continues with a review of current law affecting our national security. This course is a capstone course for politics majors and students will pursue their own specialized research projects on the topic. Prerequisite: Politics senior or consent of the instructor.
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  • POLS 485: Constitutional Change
    (Senior Seminar in American Politics & Law: Constitutional Change). While the United States may have the oldest written Constitution in the world, it has been subject to nearly constant change since the moment it was ratified. In addition to formal amendments including the Bill of Rights, our constitutional institutions and culture have been significantly modified and affected by Supreme Court opinions, presidential decisions, legislative constructions, and even citizen-based protest movements. In this seminar, we explore the question of how constitutional change has actually happened in our nation's past, and assess whether some of these procedures and mechanisms of change are better or worse than others. We will then conclude by evaluating a variety of contemporary proposals for constitutional reform. Students will thereby be invited to think both descriptively and morally about the history and future of American constitutionalism. As a capstone course for politics majors, students will pursue their own specialized research projects on the topic. Prerequisite: Politics senior or consent of instructor.
  • POLS 486: Global Justice
    Virtually all of the major pressing and controversial debates in international politics revolve on some level around questions of justice: When is humanitarian intervention justified? Are certain tactics of war morally unjustifiable? Are human rights universal ideals that should apply everywhere, or should they be limited by certain cultural and/or religious traditions? How should distributive justice work at the global level? Does justice require that rich countries allow for more immigration? Do we need a world state? In this senior seminar, students will probe these and other questions. We will examine these issues from a variety of perspectives, including ones that are skeptical about the very idea of 'global justice.' As a capstone course for politics and international relations majors, students will pursue their own specialized research projects on the topic. Prerequisite: Junior or senior politics and/or international relations majors, or consent of instructor.
  • POLS 487: The American Dream
    This senior seminar invites participants to critically examine the role of the "American Dream" in U.S. social and political life. The dream's narrative that anyone can achieve success through hard work has both inspired and limited our effort as a people to form a more perfect union. We will begin by considering the ways in which the dream narrative has become synonymous with American political culture itself, particularly as it relates to the attitudes Americans hold about equality of opportunity and social mobility. Finally, we will consider how adherence to the dream narrative affects decision-making in our democracy along a wide range of economic and social policy issues including: housing, health care, education, crime, and poverty reduction. Students will then pursue their own specialized project on the intersection of the American dream with a specific public policy topic of their choosing. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing, declared Politics major or permission of instructor.
  • POLS 490: Internship
    To be arranged individually with a faculty supervisor.
  • POLS 491: Tutorial
    To be arranged individually with a faculty supervisor.

 

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  • PSYC 110: Introduction to Psychology
    This course provides a broad, general introduction to the field of psychology, the scientific study of behavior. Topics surveyed include scientific methodology, biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, states of consciousness, learning, thinking, memory, motivation and emotion, development, personality, stress and health, psychological disorders and psychotherapy, social interaction, and diversity. Satisfactory completion of Psychology 110 is a prerequisite for most advanced courses in psychology, which generally cover in greater depth and breadth the topics you will encounter in this course. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. (Meets GEC First-Year Writing Requirement.)
  • PSYC 195: Cross-Cultural Psychology
    The subtle transaction between culture and behavior will be explored cross-culturally through the following topics: psychotherapy, a person's sense of self-control versus situational control of one's own behavior, need for achievement, stages in moral development, and management styles in work environments. Comparisons will emphasize data from the United States and Japan. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • PSYC 205: Psychology of Prejudice
    In this course we will explore psychological approaches to understanding stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination?the psychology of prejudice, for short. We will examine research and theory on topics such as historical changes in the nature of intergroup attitudes; the prevalence of prejudice in the U.S. today; the impact of stereotyping and discrimination on members of stigmatized groups; likely causes of prejudice; the psychological processes underlying different forms of prejudice (e.g., based on race, ethnicity, class, religion, gender, sexual orientation, age, ability, or appearance); and methods of combating prejudice, encouraging acceptance of diversity, and improving intergroup relations. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    AFAM 205, AMER 201
  • PSYC 206: Human Sexuality
    This course focuses on psychological aspects of human sexuality, including the sexual response cycle, intimate relationships, sexual orientations and identities, and sexual health and disease. The course aims to familiarize students with methods used in scientific research on sexuality, to encourage them to think critically about sexual issues, to help them develop a better understanding of sexual diversity, and to enable them to become responsible sexual decision makers. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing required. PSYC 110 recommended.
    GSWS 206
  • PSYC 208: Psychology of Career Development
    How do people choose their jobs? Why do certain types of people gravitate toward certain types of occupations? How can people identify the careers in which they are most likely to be happy and successful? Questions such as these are central to vocational psychology, the scientific study of people's career choices and outcomes throughout the lifespan. In this course we will examine: (a) the major theories of vocational behavior; (b) individual differences and societal factors that shape people's career paths; (c) the relations among career, family, and other life roles; (d) assessment instruments used for career planning and decision making; (e) the career counseling process; and (f) the role of gender and culture in career choice and development. Students will also have some opportunities to explore their own career paths. Prerequisite: at least sophomore standing. PSYC 110 is recommended but is not required.
  • PSYC 210: Developmental Psychology
    An examination of the principles of development with an emphasis on interpretation of empirical studies and theories. We stress the ongoing interplay of biological and environmental forces as influences on development; place development in a broad context of culture, class, and history; view children and adolescents as active shapers of their environment; emphasize both continuity and the capacity for change; and consider implications of developmental psychology for educators, practitioners, parents and policymakers. Prerequisite: Psychology 110.
    GSWS 210
  • PSYC 211: Adulthood and Aging
    Examination of developmental processes associated with adulthood, maturity, and aging. Examination of evidence for continued development throughout the life span. Evidence from a variety of sources is used in examining the person in terms of physical, psychological, social, and cultural influences on development. Prerequisite: Psychology 110.
    GSWS 211
  • PSYC 215: Environmental Psychology
    Environmental psychology is the discipline concerned with interactions and relationships between people and their environments (including built, natural, and social environments). In this course we apply psychological methods and theories to a variety of issues and behaviors, considering such topics as landscape preference, wayfinding, weather, noise, natural disasters, territoriality, crowding, and the design of residential and work environments. We also explore images of nature, wilderness, home, and place, as well as the impact of these images on behavior. The course is grounded in empirical work, and incorporates observations and experiences in the local environment. No prerequisite.
    ES 215
  • PSYC 221: Research Methods & Statistics I
    An introduction to the basic research methods and statistical techniques used in psychology. In the first semester, the primary focus will be on descriptive and relational methods (e.g., naturalistic observation, surveys, correlational designs) and descriptive statistics. In the second semester the primary focus will be on controlled experiments and inferential statistics. The course sequence includes a required laboratory component in which students gain hands-on experience using statistical software to analyze psychological data. Prerequisite for 221: Psychology 110 with a grade of at least C-. Psychology 221 and 222 must be taken in sequence.
  • PSYC 222: Research Methods & Statistics II
    An introduction to the basic research methods and statistical techniques used in psychology. In the first semester, the primary focus will be on descriptive and relational methods (e.g., naturalistic observation, surveys, correlational designs) and descriptive statistics. In the second semester the primary focus will be on controlled experiments and inferential statistics. The course sequence includes a required laboratory component in which students gain hands-on experience using statistical software to analyze psychological data. Prerequisite for 222: Psychology 221 with a grade of at least C-. Psychology 221 and 222 must be taken in sequence.
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  • PSYC 255: Social Psychology
    Survey of the major topics of inquiry in social psychology: attitudes, social cognition, attribution, social norms and roles, conformity, social influence, persuasion, group dynamics, aggression, altruism, interpersonal attraction, stereotyping and prejudice, and conflict and peacemaking. Emphasis on applying social psychological principles to real-world phenomena as well as understanding basic research. Prerequisite: Psychology 110.
  • PSYC 310: Sensation and Perception
    As you go through your day, you are constantly sensing and perceiving: You feel the warmth of the hot shower on your skin, you smell the aroma of the coffee in your cup, you taste the disagreeable tartness of your orange juice after brushing your teeth, you see the bright colors of the spring day on your way to class, you hear the words of your instructor and you organize them into coherent ideas. This course explores the anatomy and physiology of the sensory systems and the way in which the raw sensory signals become organized into meaningful perceptions. Prerequisite: Psychology 222 with a grade of at least C-.
    NEUR 310
  • PSYC 318: Psychology Applied to Education
    In this course, we examine a series of questions about how psychological knowledge can inform and improve education. What does psychology tell us about teaching and learning? How do we measure the success of various educational practices? What is the best way to describe the psychological processes by which students gain information and expertise? What accounts for individual differences in learning, and how do teachers (and schools) address these individual needs? How do social and economic factors shape teaching practices and the educational experiences of individual students? Some of our work in this course will involve reading and discussion; a significant portion of the time will be spent observing children in their educational environments. Prerequisites: Psychology 110 and at least sophomore standing.
  • PSYC 320: Learning
    This course examines the theoretical approaches, historical influences, and contemporary research in human and animal learning. In addition to providing a strong background in classical, operant, and contemporary conditioning models, this course explores the applications of these principles in a variety of contexts, such as behavioral therapy, drug addiction, self-control, decision-making, motor skill acquisition, and education. Furthermore, this course surveys the commonalities and differences across species in cognitive processes, such as memory, reasoning, problem-solving, and language. Prerequisite: Psychology 222 with a grade of at least C-.
    NEUR 320
  • PSYC 330: Motivation & Emotion
    The broad range of motivations and emotions is studied including the relative contributions of learning, genetics, and critical periods in development. How and why did motivations and emotions evolve, and what are their bases in brain systems, hormones, and other aspects of physiology? Which of our motivations involve accurate regulations to a 'set point' (such as body temperature and weight) and which do not? How does the great subtlety of human emotional expression develop? Includes consideration of competency, security, creativity, frustration, aggression, love, sexuality, and values. Prerequisite: Psychology 221 with a grade of at least C-.
    NEUR 330
  • PSYC 340: Psychology of Gender
    Sex and gender have long been controversial topics in psychology. In this class, we will cast a wide and critical eye on how sex and gender are defined, conceptualized, and studied. We will ask a series of questions about similarities and differences in a number of areas, including relationships, mental health, abilities and achievement, aggression, communication, hormones, and physical health and functioning. We will discuss gender development and socialization, as well as gender inequality and sex-role stereotypes, paying particular attention to how the scientific study of sex and gender is used and misused in contemporary society. Prerequisites: Psychology 110 and sophomore standing. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    GSWS 340
  • PSYC 345: Organizational & Industrial Psych
    The human side of management; why people work; increasing workers' motivation; enhancing the productivity of work groups; interpersonal relations in work settings; effective leadership in organizations. Prerequisite: Psychology 221 with a grade of at least C-.
  • PSYC 350: Abnormal Psychology
    Intended to acquaint students with the biological, emotional, behavioral, and cognitive foundations of psychopathology. Issues of classification, description, etiology, and treatment of abnormal behavior are examined from the point of view of contemporary empirically based perspectives. Specifically, these issues are considered in the context of a variety of psychopathological manifestations, including anxiety, eating, schizophrenic, mood, personality, addictive, and sexual disorders. Prerequisite: Psychology 221 with a grade of at least C-.
    NEUR 350
  • PSYC 355: Community Psych
    Community Psychologists study individuals in the contexts of their communities - e.g., families, peer groups, schools, workplaces, religious groups, culture, and society - and strive to engage collaboratively in research and community action work to ameliorate social problems, enhance the overall well-being of the community and its members, and make positive public policy changes. In this course, we will: (1) Consider the goals and roles of Community Psychologists; (2) Examine how social structures and community problems affect individuals' lives, and analyze our own underlying assumptions about these issues; (3) Consider the importance of diversity and psychological sense of community; (4) Explore methods & strategies for citizen participation and social change; and (5) Learn to use psychological research to inform social policy change and prevention efforts. Topics may include: Family Violence; Foster Care; Racism & the Justice System; Community Organizing for Rights (e.g., Civil Rights, Workers' Rights, Women's Rights); Community Organizing Against Harms (e.g., Hazardous Waste); Community Mental Health; Poverty & Homelessness; Children and Welfare Reform; Community Violence Prevention; Adaptation and Coping with Disaster (e.g., 9/11, Hurricane Katrina); and Advocacy on Capitol Hill - The Tobacco Lobby and Teenage Smoking. Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or equivalent. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    GSWS 355
  • PSYC 360: Cognitive Psychology
    Surveys the history, philosophy, and research surrounding selected issues in cognitive psychology, including perception, attention, memory, language, imagery, reasoning, problem-solving, and decision-making. Students will learn what is currently known about these topics, the problems facing researchers, and how researchers go about solving these problems. They also will be given the opportunity to experience cognitive psychology research first-hand, as they participate in classic experiments and learn to analyze, interpret, and write up their results. Prerequisite: Psychology 222 with a grade of at least C-.
    NEUR 360
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  • PSYC 370: Neuroscience and Behavior
    How do the brain's neurons, synapses, and electrical and chemical activities participate in psychological processes? What are the neural foundations of human perception, motivation and emotion, learning, memory, movement, and consciousness? Discussion of the modes of action of antidepressants, other psychotherapeutic drugs, and drugs of abuse. In what ways are functions localized in the brain, and how is it possible for recovery from brain damage to take place? Laboratory sessions include experiments in brain foundations of sensation, movement, emotion, and learning in animals, demonstration of human brain waves, comparison of brains with computers, and basic exercises in computerized data acquisition and analysis. Prerequisite: a college course in mathematics or natural science approved by the instructor (such as the core introductory courses in biology or chemistry) or Psychology 221 with a grade of at least C-.
    NEUR 370
  • PSYC 372: Pharmacology: Drug, Brain, Behavior
    In this course, we will explore ideas and principles regarding neuronal communication and drug interactions that govern behavior. We will explore communication patterns of both electrical and chemical signaling, define complex dynamics of drug distributions and identify how these processes are influenced by individual genetics. This class will also investigate the interaction between neurotransmitters and drugs at specific neuronal receptors, which will be discussed from the perspective of agonism and antagonism. We will use these principles to guide our understanding of pharmaco-therapeutics that are focused on symptom targeting. Students will also have the opportunity to discuss clinical cases and participate in the development of strategic therapeutic approaches based on current research towards the treatment of psychiatric and neurological disorders. Prerequisites: PSYC110 and BIOL221 with a grade of at least C-, or permission of instructor.
    NEUR 372, BIOL 372
  • PSYC 375: Personality
    This course offers a general introduction to the study of personality. It surveys the major theoretical perspectives and research issues in the field of personality psychology. In particular, the contributions made by psychodynamic, humanistic, trait, and cognitive-behavioral theories to the study of personality development, personality assessment, and personality change will be reviewed. Students will be encouraged to examine critically the diversity of those theoretical formulations, their basic assumptions, and the research evidence available to support them. The area of personality assessment will receive particular attention. Test construction and relevant psychometric issues will be examined during lectures, class discussions, and paper assignments. Prerequisite: Psychology 221 with a grade of at least C-.
  • PSYC 380: Practicum: Internships
    Supervised practice in applying psychological principles in research, organizational, and service settings outside the College. A wide array of placements is available, including mental health facilities, social service agencies, corporate and military environments, school counseling programs, and non-profit organizations; we work with students to adapt internships to their individual interests and goals. Students should initiate plans, in collaboration with the instructor, during the semester preceding the internship. All internships in psychology are done within this course and include an accompanying on-campus seminar. Open to junior and senior psychology majors with permission of the instructor. (Because the practicum experience varies, students may be permitted to repeat.)
  • PSYC 410: History and Systems of Psych
    This course overviews psychological thought and methodology from the emergence of the discipline out of philosophy and the natural sciences to the social science we know today. You will learn about prominent psychological theories and methodologies from a historical perspective. A major focus will be on experimental psychology as it began in 19th century German universities and continued in the United States. The other main focus will be on the development of applied fields such as clinical psychology and industrial/organizational psychology. We will read original works by significant historical figures in psychology, as well as papers by historians. Special attention will be given to the recurring controversies that have fueled debate and motivated research on the nature and origins of human behavior and mental processes. In addition, you will be introduced to the process of historiography, i.e. the theory and methods that underlie the research and writing of history. Prerequisite: Psychology 222 with a grade of at least C- or senior standing in another major or permission of the instructor. Preference in registration to graduating seniors majoring in psychology.
  • PSYC 420: The Neuroscience of Reward
    "Reward" is a concept with which most people are familiar: a hard-earned vacation at the end of a grueling work schedule, an A grade on a particularly challenging academic assignment, a good meal and a glass of wine after a long day?s work. However, this everyday usage of the term belies its complexity. In this course, we will explore "reward" from behavioral and neurobiological perspectives, often focusing on associative learning paradigms that allow for careful dissection of appetitive and consummatory behaviors. We will consider the underlying neural circuitry that enables individuals to learn about rewards and cues that signal these motivationally significant events. Our analysis will emphasize the similarities and distinctions between natural reward and drug reward. Prerequisite: PSYC 222 with a grade of at least C- or advanced standing in another major, with permission of the instructor. Preference in registration to graduating seniors majoring in psychology or neuroscience.

    NEUR 420
  • PSYC 430: Psychology and Law
    An examination of psycholegal research, theory, and practice. Sample topics include: psychological testing in education and employment; clinical assessments of insanity, competence, and dangerousness; eyewitness testimony; polygraphs and lie detection; psychological profiling; the psychology of false confessions; psychologists as trial consultants; jury decision making; capital punishment; and discrimination in the legal system. As we survey the field we will consider how psychology can help the law and how studying the law enriches psychology. Prerequisite: Psychology 222 with a grade of at least C- or advanced standing in another major, with permission of the instructor. Preference in registration to graduating seniors majoring in psychology.
  • PSYC 440: Social Cognition
    This seminar explores the basic cognitive processes that govern how people understand themselves and others, and how these processes guide human social interaction. Sample topics include impression formation, benefits and pitfalls of efficient thinking, automaticity in behavior, motivated cognition, face perception and memory, cognitive approaches to prejudice reduction, and the emerging field of social neuroscience. The goal of the course is to develop an appreciation of the cognitive mechanisms (e.g., attention, perception, memory) that underpin social thought and behavior.. Prerequisite: Psychology 222 with a grade of at least C- or advanced standing in another major with permission of the instructor. Completion of PSYC 255 is strongly encouraged but not required. Preference in registration to graduating seniors majoring in psychology.
  • PSYC 450: Health Psychology
    This course explores a variety of research and clinical issues in health psychology. Representative topics include the role of behavior in health and disease, the neurobiology of emotion, the major stress-related and behavior-related disorders (e.g., coronary heart disease, cancer, headaches, AIDS), prevention strategies, and psychologically based treatment approaches. Our primary focus will be a methodological and conceptual analysis of the health psychology literature, which we will consider from a scientific perspective. An understanding of these issues, however, should help you become a more critical consumer of health information and health advice offered by the media, and may inspire you to make positive changes in your own health-related behavior and lifestyle. Prerequisite: Psychology 222 with a grade of at least C- or advanced standing in another major, with permission of the instructor. Preference in registration to graduating seniors majoring in psychology or neuroscience.
    NEUR 450
  • PSYC 460: Psychology of Language
    (Offered Less Frequently)Every major theoretical approach to human behavior has attempted to explain how humans learn and use language. Information-processing theories and computer models of the mind have had an impact on ancient questions concerning verbal behavior. Topics covered include philosophy of language, history of psycholinguistics, the influence of context, common ground and world knowledge in language understanding, lexical processing and lexical ambiguity, syntactic processing, inferences in discourse processing, speech acts, pragmatics, figurative language, conceptual metaphors, and poetic metaphors. Readings include original journal articles and manuscripts in preparation that illustrate the 'cutting edge' controversies in contemporary psycholinguistics. Prerequisite: Psychology 222 with a grade of at least C- or advanced standing in another major, with permission of the instructor. Preference in registration to graduating seniors majoring in psychology.
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  • PSYC 470: Gender-Based Violence
    Gender-based violence is a global problem that occurs in many forms (e.g., dating violence, intimate partner violence, and sexual assault). In this course we will examine psychological research and theory on gender-based violence perpetration, prevention, and treatment. In this examination, we will consider: the prevalence of gender-based violence; the influence of the media influences; the roles of ethnicity, sexual orientation, and culture; the effects of gender-based violence on mental and physical health; and the helpful and unhelpful ways in which communities respond to such violence. Prerequisite: Psychology 222 with a grade of at least C- or advanced standing in another major, with permission of the instructor. Preference in registration will be given to graduating seniors majoring in psychology.

 

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  • RELG 118: Comparative Religious Ethics
    This course introduces the sources and patterns of moral reasoning within different religious traditions, both Western and non-Western. Participants compare arguments advocating specific positions on such issues as the morality of war, nature of corporate ethics, treatment of the environment, bio-ethical decision-making, rights of animals within a society, and the responsibility of government to protect its constituents. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ETHC 118
  • RELG 175: Early Christianity
    This course will offer a general introduction to the history of Christianity in the first two centuries of the Common Era, tracing the evolution of the movement from its beginnings as a sect within Second Temple Judaism to its emergence as a distinct religion in the Greco-Roman world. The course will also examine the role of major figures, beliefs, practices, phenomena and developments during the first two centuries. Special attention will be given to (1) the social, political, religious, and, philosophical milieu in which Christianity emerged, (2) the scholarly quest for 'historical Jesus,' (3) the significance of Paul and the growth of the movement (4) the relationship between Judaism and Christianity and (5) the various sects and conflicts in the first two centuries. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • RELG 180: Religion, SciFi, and Fantasy
    (Religion, Science Fiction, Fantasy) Of the literary genres, perhaps science fiction and fantasy best allow creative artists to imagine real and possible answers to the deep religious questions that have historically driven philosophers, theologians, and thinkers. Who are we? What do we want? Where did we come from? How does everything end? What is the meaning of life, the universe, and everything? In this class we examine science fiction and fantasy short stories, motion pictures, novels, and television programs to ask how creative artists and wider society have asked and answered these questions. We also consider how science fiction and fantasy have commented on and mirrored real-world religions. No prerequisites. Intended for first-year students and sophomores only.
    ENGL 180
  • RELG 185: Film and Religion
    Viewing films as meaningful texts, this course examines the perspectives offered by Asian and American filmmakers on such religious questions as: What does it mean to be human? How does death inform the living of life? How do values shape relationships? What is community and how is it created? What is ethical behavior? The range of films explored here function as vehicles for entering religious worldviews, communicating societal values, and probing different responses to the question of how to live a meaningful life. No prerequisites. Intended for first-year students and sophomores. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)

    ASIA 185, CINE 185
  • RELG 200: Topics: Relig & Politics in the USA
    (Topics: Religion and Politics in the USA) This course focuses on the ways religion has been a source of political division and unity in America. Polls indicate that America is, by far, the most religious of industrial democracies and that our contentious political debates are, in large part, due to the religious dimensions of morally evocative issues like abortion and gay marriage, and the firm positions of such constituencies as the Christian Right and new Religious Left. Historically, public debates concerning abolition, suffrage and temperance drew on scholarly and legal interpretations of the Constitutional promise of both religious freedom and the separation of church and state. We will examine the role of religion in the founding of the American republic, and in contemporary political movements such as Black Lives Matter, the Federation for Immigration Reform, 21st century civil rights organizations with concerns ranging from prison reform to the environment, and the 2016 U.S. Presidential election. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    POLS 236, AMER 220
  • RELG 210: Religions of Indigenous Peoples
    Our increased awareness of the global community has given rise to a new interest in the religions of indigenous peoples. This course will explore the religious heritage of Native Americans, Africans, and Australian aborigines and other indigenous peoples, including their views of the role of human beings relative to the rest of nature. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • RELG 211: Global Judaism
    This course explores the origin, development, and contemporary life of Judaism. We will focus on how both ancient and contemporary Judaism emerge from a mix of different cultural and social forces, and how this religion has been shaped by thousands of years of spread (diaspora) throughout the globe. We consider texts, practices, and community developments, and look at Judaism as not just a historical religion but one that continues to develop and change today. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • RELG 212: Global Christianity
    This course explores the origin, development, and contemporary state of Christianity with reference to the many cultures and societies that have shaped it, the world's largest religion. We begin with the origin and early development of Christianity within the context of ancient Judaism and the Roman Empire. We consider the development of Christianity into its many contemporary forms, and focus throughout the class on how Christianity is practiced throughout the world. We pay special attention to how Christianity has developed in places unfamiliar to most Americans, such as Eastern Europe, Asia, and Africa. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    IREL 262
  • RELG 213: Global Islam
    This course explores the origin and development of the Islamic religious tradition, along with varying interpretations of Islamic law and prominent issues facing contemporary Muslims around the world. Participants in the course read classical and contemporary literature as windows into Muslim life in different cultures and historical periods, and view Islamic art and architecture as visual texts. To learn about the rich diversity within Islam, students can work with texts, rituals, poetry, music, and film from a range of cultures within the Muslim world, from the Middle East, Africa, and Asia to Europe and North America. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ASIA 213, ISLM 213, IREL 263
  • RELG 214: Global Hinduism
    This course examines the teachings of the Hindu religious tradition as presented in the earliest writings of the tradition, as well as in dramas, epic narratives, and contemporary religious practice. In the course of the semester, we will visit Hindu Temples in the Chicago area as we explore the historical, social, and cultural context of Indian religious themes as they continue to be practiced in the 21st century. Texts range from philosophical musings about the nature of the universe to the story of a king who loses his wife to a 10-headed demon. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ASIA 214, IREL 264
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  • RELG 215: Global Buddhism
    An introduction to the origins of Buddhism in India as well as to the major cultural and historical influences on the spread of Buddhism throughout Asia, particularly in India, Sri Lanka, Myanmar, Thailand, Tibet, China, and Japan. The course will examine various forms of Buddhist practice including devotion, ethics, sangha membership, meditation, rituals, and festivals. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ASIA 215, IREL 265
  • RELG 216: Chinese Religions
    Focusing primarily on the teachings of the Confucian (and neo-Confucian), Daoist, and early Chinese Buddhist traditions, we will explore the concepts and practices of these communities within their historical, cultural, and social contexts. Reading narrative, poetic, and classical texts in translation that present such ideas as the ethics of human-heartedness, the relativity of all things, and the importance of self-sacrifice, we will discuss what teachings these masterful texts offer 21st century questioners. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ASIA 216, IREL 266
  • RELG 220: Islam and Pop Culture
    In recent decades the global Islamic revival has produced a new generation of Muslim film stars and fashion models, Sufi self-help gurus, Muslim comic book heroes, romance novel writers, calligraphy artists, and even Barbie dolls. This course explores the pop sensations, market niches, and even celebrity scandals of 'Popular Islam' within the broader context of religious identity, experience, and authority in Islamic traditions. Balancing textual depth with geographic breadth, the course includes several case studies: Egypt, Indonesia, Iran, Mali, Turkey, and North America. Students will learn about how religious trends are created -- and debated -- on pop culture's public stage. We will reflect critically on both primary materials and inter-disciplinary scholarly writings about the relationships between pop culture, religious identities, devotional practices, and political projects. No pre-requisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ASIA 220, ISLM 220, IREL 260
  • RELG 221: Dialogue: Race, Ethnicity, Religion
    In a culturally and socially diverse society, exploring issues of difference, conflict, and community is needed to facilitate understanding and improve relations between social/cultural groups. In this course, students will engage in meaningful discussion of controversial, challenging, and divisive issues in society related to race, ethnicity, and religion. Students will be challenged to increase personal awareness of their own cultural experience, expand knowledge of the historic and social realities of other cultural groups, and take action as agents of positive social change in their communities. This course requires a high level of participation from all students. Note: This course earns .5 credits. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ETHC 250, AFAM 250
  • RELG 223: Does God Exist?
    This course considers arguments for and against the existence of God, as well as the resources and methods those arguments use. After some discussion of logic and argumentation, we will consider questions such as: how could one demonstrate that God does or does not exist? What would constitute 'proof' of such a claim? How are faith and reason working for similar or opposed ends in such arguments? What does the character of arguments for or against God's existence say about human life and thought? To address these questions, we will consider the works of theologians and philosophers from monotheistic traditions.
    PHIL 223
  • RELG 230: Religion and Politics
    This course examines the complex social, historical, and intellectual forces that impact the relationships between religion and politics. Students begin by exploring the historical genealogy of Western ideas about the proper role of religion in the public square. We draw from various theoretical approaches in order to better understand particular conflict situations such as contemporary U.S. political debates on the role of religion in policy-making; the tension between Islam and democracy in Turkey; the head scarf debate in France; and the actions of Christian and Buddhist monks during the Vietnam War. We will critically reflect on the role of religious ideologies as well as the ways in which religious explanations of politics and violence can obscure more enduring histories of power relations. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    POLS 230, IREL 267
  • RELG 234: Witches, Preachers, and Mystics
    In this course students consider the historical development of religion in the United States of America. We study topics such as the contact between Native Americans and European settlers, religion and the founding of the Republic, religious revivals and awakenings, immigration and religion, the rise of new forms of religion in the United States, responses to scientific and technological developments, and the entangling of religion and politics. The course covers religion from the colonial period to the dawn of the twentieth century. No prerequisites.
    HIST 234, AMER 234
  • RELG 235: Relig in Contemp America
    This discussion-based course is driven by contemporary events and issues in American religion. Students are asked to follow news and social media coverage of current issues in religion, which we analyze in class. In addition to topical current issues, we cover important factors influencing American religion such as religious pluralism and diversity, immigration, alternative religions, religion in popular culture, and politics. Finally, we look to how today's generation of college students and other young adults are reshaping religion in contemporary America. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • RELG 237: African American Religions
    This course is an exploration of the rich diversity of African American religions from the colonial period to the present. Attention will be given to key figures, institutional expressions as well as significant movements in North America, the Caribbean and broader Black Atlantic. Major themes include African traditions in American religions, slavery and religion, redemptive suffering, sacred music, social protest, Black Nationalism, African American women and religion, religion in hip hop and secularity in black religious literature. Students will learn about the ways these themes have often served both as unique contributions to and critiques of America?s political establishment and social landscape. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    AFAM 237, AMER 230
  • RELG 240: Religious Perspectives Environment
    The current environmental crises rest on a layer of philosophical and religious assumptions that are currently being challenged. Are human beings the center of the universe? Is humankind's mandate to dominate nature? Does nature belong to human beings or do human beings belong to nature? Contemporary Judaic, Christian, and Islamic ecological visions and action programs will be considered, along with the religious views and practices of particular native cultures of North and South America, Australia, and Africa. Participants may also discuss ecological perspectives derived from South and East Asian religious cultures. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ES 240
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  • RELG 241: Religion & Science
    Even a cursory look at today's news reveals that the relationship between religion and science is a hot topic. So it has been for many centuries. In this course, we consider historical and contemporary issues in the relationship between religion and science in the modern world. We make use of historical, philosophical, and literary approaches to study how individuals and groups have understood religion and science, and how they have sought to understand and relate to the natural world. No prerequisites.
  • RELG 242: Cults, Sects, and Communes
    This course provides an introduction to the study of new religious movements, popularly called sects and cults, and the communal movements that are their more secularized cousins. We will consider several case studies and examine the wider phenomenon of such groups in the modern world. We will pay attention to the traditional sociological issues of leadership, charisma, conversion, and belief maintenance, as well as the lived practices and experiences of members of such groups, such as rituals, gender practices, and holidays. No prerequisites.

    SOAN 242
  • RELG 248: Crusade & Holy War in Med Europe
    (Crusade and Holy War in Medieval Europe) Medieval Europe experienced widespread debate about the use of violence by Christians. The course considers early definitions of Just War and the attempts by the church to control violence around the year 1000. Detailed examination of the origin of the idea of crusade and the history of the First Crusade (1095-99) from Christian, Jewish, Greek, and Muslim perspectives. Examines the later medieval phenomenon of crusade against other Christians.
    HIST 243, ISLM 243
  • RELG 250: Philosophy of Religion
    This course is an introduction to the philosophy of religion. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of religious experience, ritual, prayer, and sacred books in articulating the idea of God. Course includes a philosophical encounter with mysticism as well as the more traditional metaphysical formulations of the divine, in both the West and East. The critical concern of a variety of rational skepticisms will also be examined.
    PHIL 250
  • RELG 255: 21st Century Islam
    The 1.5 billion Muslims around the world represent an immense diversity of languages, ethnicities, cultures, contexts and perspectives. This course focuses on 21st century issues faced by Muslims living in different cultures. Contemporary social issues are examined in light of different interpretations of Islamic practice, global communication and social networks, elements of popular culture, and the interface between religion and government. Biographies, short stories, contemporary journalism, and films that explore life in Muslim and non-Muslim countries present a nuanced portrait of contemporary Islam. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ISLM 255, ASIA 255, IREL 268
  • RELG 275: Female Religious Images in West
    Individual religious traditions have incorporated female images and ideals in different ways as goddesses, priestesses, and saints. The objective of this course is to examine ways in which the divine has been expressed in specifically female forms, as well as to examine the characteristics of female religious experience. Specific figures include Inanna, the central goddess figure of ancient Sumer; Eve and Sarah from the Hebrew Bible; Mary and female monastics from the Christian tradition; and contemporary Jewish, Christian, and Muslim women actively participating in their traditions. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    GSWS 275
  • RELG 276: Female Religious Images in Asia
    Goddess figures in India, China, and Japan are studied in this class along with the roles of human women in particular Asian religious traditions. This class explores the experiences of Buddhist nuns, Hindu and Muslim female saints, traditional healers, and shamans. Readings are drawn from religious texts, myths, and short stories from specific Asian cultures. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ASIA 276, GSWS 276
  • RELG 286: Topics in Islamic Art
    This course examines the visual arts of early and medieval Islam from the seventh through the thirteenth centuries in Muslim territories, ranging from Central Asia to Spain. Through an examination of diverse media, we shall explore the role of visual arts played in the formation and expression of Islamic cultural identity. Topics will include the uses of figural and non-figural imagery, religious and secular art, public and private art and the status, function, and meaning of the portable luxury objects. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ARTH 286, ISLM 286
  • RELG 300: Religion in Global Context
    Using a religious studies methodology, this course examines the nature of religious experience as expressed by different religious communities and cultures from ancient periods into the present. Members of the class choose individual research topics that might focus on religious artifacts, rituals, social movements, communities, and the ways that religious ideas influence societies. Case studies are diverse, representing many religious traditions, and may include descriptions of Vietnamese Buddhists negotiating religion in a non-religious state, American Christians walking the Camino de Santiago de Compostela, Jews making a living in World War II Shanghai, Hindus building Vaishnava temples in Chicago, or Indonesian designers setting 21st century high fashion trends for contemporary Muslims. This seminar is designed for religion majors and minors, but also welcomes students in other majors with appropriate preparation. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    IREL 360
  • RELG 307: Roman and Medieval Christianity
    This course will examine key questions debated by Christians from the origins of the faith in the Roman era to the end of the Middle Ages, many of which continue to be discussed today. These may include: should Christians use violence at all, and if so, under what circumstances? What is the correct relationship between the Church and the government? What makes a person a saint - celibacy? Harsh asceticism? Aiding the poor? Preaching the Gospel? What is the appropriate role of wealth and property in the life of a dedicated Christian? Should a Christian seeking religious truth rely only on the Bible and revelation, or do logic and scientific inquiry have a role to play? Students will work extensively with primary sources in translation and significant works of modern scholarship. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    HIST 322
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  • RELG 310: Islamic Mysticism
    Muslim saints and seekers have performed mystical practices for more than 1300 years in areas stretching from Europe and North Africa to Turkey, Iran, and the Indian subcontinent. Contemporary holy men and holy women continue to teach such mystical practices as the dancing and whirling of dervishes, the up-tempo singing of qawwals in India and Pakistan, and the rhythmic chanting of Arabic verses in Egypt. In this course, we will explore the religious thinking of these holy men and women through their writing, art, and music. Texts will include novels, short stories, allegorical tales, biographies, and films. No prerequisite. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ISLM 310, ASIA 310
  • RELG 314: Hindu Pilgrimage: India and Chicago
    The course explores the ritual practice of pilgrimage at major pilgrimage sites in India, and at parallel temples in the Chicago area. Using extensive field visits and the framework of pilgrimage as the structure of the course, the class prepares for and visits 5-6 Hindu temples in the Chicago area to observe rituals being performed, speak with practitioners, and experience festival worship. Through reading and film, we examine the history, literature, ritual traditions, art, and music of Hindu pilgrims. Following specific pilgrimage routes, we explore this religious practice as it is conducted within 21st century cultures of expanding global communities, in India and in Chicago. The class will use primary source texts, maps, field visits to temples, film, and research to understand Hindu religious communities in India and Chicago. Prerequisite: Religion 214 or permission of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • RELG 315: US Catholic Immigrant Experience
    From the Irish who arrived before the Civil War to the Mexicans and Vietnamese who have come recently, the Catholic experience in the US has been a continuing story of immigration. This course examines how succeeding immigrant groups have practiced and lived their Catholic faith in different times and places. Religion cannot be separated from the larger social and economic context in which it is embedded, so the course will also pay attention to the ways in which the social and economic conditions that greeted the immigrants on their arrival shaped how they went about praying and working. Finally, the changing leadership of the Catholic Church will be taken into account, since it provided the ecclesiastical framework for the new Catholic arrivals. Prerequisite: HIST 120 or HIST 121 or permission of the instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    HIST 315, AMER 315
  • RELG 316: Walking to Heaven: Pilgrimage Asia
    Using a seminar format, this course will explore pilgrimage sites in a range of different Asian cultures including India, China, Japan, Korea, and Pakistan. Students will choose a specific pilgrimage site and religious tradition as the focus of their research. Through reading, film, discussion, research, and student presentations, we will examine the roles of pilgrims and traders, sacred place and sacred time, and the ritual elements present in Asian pilgrimage practices across different religious traditions including Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Christianity. Prerequisite: Religion 213, 214, 215 or 216 or permission of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • RELG 318: Buddhism and Social Activism
    This course focuses on contemporary Buddhist practitioners in Asia, North America, and Europe committed to environmental movements, human rights activism, prison work, education in impoverished communities, women's rights advocacy, hospice care, and peacemaking. Engaged Buddhists from Japan and Vietnam to Thailand, Burma/Myanmar, India, and North America advocate social action rooted in Buddhist values as a form of religious practice. Using Buddhist texts, films, and case studies, participants research specific aspects of contemporary Engaged Buddhist practice, as a way to explore the relationship between social action and spiritual understanding. Students with experience in the following disciplines may find this course particularly intriguing: sociology, anthropology, environmental studies, history, politics, international relations, women?s studies, and Asian Studies. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ASIA 318
  • RELG 319: European Reformations: 1200-1600
    The Protestant Reformation and Catholic Counter-Reformation were a major turning-point in the political, social and religious history of the West. This course will examine: the background to the Reformations in Pauline and Augustinian theology and medieval reform movements; the writings of key figures including Luther, Calvin, Zwingli, and Loyola; the political and social ramifications of the Reformations, particularly in France, England, and the German Empire; the tradition of historiography on the Reformations.
    HIST 328
  • RELG 320: Topics in the Study of Religion
    This seminar examines in depth one particular subject area in religious studies. Topics vary from year to year. For Spring 2017, the topic is Religion, Architecture, and Space in Chicago. Chicago is renowned as one of the most vibrant centers of religious diversity and architectural sophistication in the United States. This course looks to the intersection between American religion and American architecture to study how communities of faith have created and used different urban and suburban spaces in the greater Chicago area. We focus on immigrant groups, neighborhoods, and sacred spaces themselves. This course includes both historical and living communities and spaces, drawing from the tools of religious studies, history, urban studies, and architectural studies, and features several hands-on site visits. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • RELG 322: Religious Existentialism
    An epoch of European philosophy and religious thought culminated in the great system developed by Hegel. In its wake came a literature of protest, beginning with the Danish philosopher and religious thinker Soren Kierkegaard and moving through a later generation of European intellectuals who came to maturity between the two world wars. Included are Jewish voices such as Martin Buber and Franz Rosenzweig as well as Christian writers such as Paul Tillich and Gabriel Marcel. Readings include texts by these religious existentialists. Prerequisite: Any Religion course or permission of instructor.
    PHIL 322
  • RELG 326: Identity/Body/Persecution Med Europ
    (Identity, Body, and Persecution in Medieval Europe) Medieval men and women discussed many of the same questions of identity that we do: What makes an individual unique? How does group affiliation affect identity? What is the relationship between identity and change? How does faith in God influence understanding of the individual? This course considers the following topics: medieval conceptions of the individual in Christian autobiography; the role of the body and gender in determining identity (exploring topics such as the Eucharist, the cult of saints, and sex difference); how medieval Europeans defined their own identity by persecuting the 'other,' including heretics, Jews, and lepers; how change affected identity in medieval texts such as werewolf stories and resurrection theology.
    HIST 326, GSWS 305
  • RELG 335: Religion and Food
    Everyone eats, and every religion talks about eating. In this class, we sample from a rich menu of religious approaches to food, making use of scholarly articles, spirituality guides, cookbooks, and memoirs. From the Christian Communion to Jewish Kosher laws to the Buddhist mindful eating, the world's major religions use food to structure the lives, practices, and beliefs of their adherents. In this class we digest some of the symbolic meanings, self-definitions, and communal and individual identities that develop out of religion and food. Prerequisite: Any Religion course or permission of instructor.(Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
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  • RELG 380: J.R.R. Tolkien and the Inklings
    (J.R.R. Tolkien and the Literature of the Inklings.) This seminar will examine the literary legacy of J.R.R. Tolkien and his fellow writers C.S. Lewis, Charles Williams, and Owen Barfield -- all pioneers of the twentieth-century fantasy fiction genre. This course will involve close reading of major works by each author as well as opportunity to discuss the fascinating biographical, historical, aesthetic, and mythic underpinnings of their works. The seminar will pay especial attention to the Inklings' intellectual and artistic indebtedness to the medieval past, to their discourses about religion, politics, and ethics, to their eccentric relationship with "literary modernism," and to the way their fiction refracts major twentieth-century events, particularly World Wars I and II. Prerequisite: ENGL 210 or permission of the instructor.
    ENGL 405
  • RELG 390: Sociology of Religion
    This seminar starts with major classical theories of sociology of religion including those of secularization and privatization of religion in the modern world. Then we shall examine the relevant events of the past quarter of the century, namely the sudden explosion of politicized and highly public religions in the Western and the non-Western worlds. The existing sociological literature didn't anticipate the current significance of religion and this tension is expected to generate interesting debates in this seminar. Special attention will be given to a comparative study of public religions in Western countries (e.g., Brazil, Poland, Spain, and the United States) and in the Middle East (Egypt, Iran, Saudi Arabia). (Meets the GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    SOAN 390, IREL 375
  • RELG 490: Internship

  • RELG 492: Senior Seminar
    This course focuses on independent research with seminar-style discussion in meetings with students and faculty, with particular attention paid to methods in the study of religion. Each participant will write and present a major research paper. The seminar will provide a forum in which students will explore different methodological approaches and discuss their research with others. Required of all religion majors in their junior or senior year except those completing their senior capstone requirement by writing a senior thesis. Open to non-majors with appropriate preparation and permission of the instructor. Prerequisites: At least three courses in religion.
  • RELG 493: Research Project
    Research in collaboration with a departmental faculty member. Consult with any member of the department for application information.
  • RELG 494: Senior Thesis
    Research guided by a departmental faculty member culminating in a senior thesis, fulfilling the College's Senior Studies Requirement. Consult any member of the department for further information.

 

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  • SOAN 110: Intro to Sociology and Anthropology
    An inquiry into the social (group rather than individual) bases of human practices and human life: an unfamiliar but revealing perspective on the familiar world. Limited to first- and second-year students.
    IREL 160
  • SOAN 201: Ancient Greece:Life, Thought, Arts
    See Program in Greece and Turkey under Undergraduate Curriculum for course description. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    GKCV 201, ART 201, CLAS 201
  • SOAN 202: Greece in the Bronze Age
    On-site study of Minoan and Mycenean cultures, with travel to sites such as Agamemnon's citadel at Myceanae and Minos's palace at Knossos. The course extends roughly from mid-March through early April. See Program in Greece under Undergraduate Curriculum for further information. Offered only in Greece and Turkey. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    GKCV 202, ART 202, SOAN 202
  • SOAN 203: Greece in Classical-Roman Ages
    On-site exploration of Greek Civilization, examining its foundations in the Archaic Age, its height during the Classical Age and its transformation during the Hellenistic Age and finally the emergence of Roman influence on Greek cities. The course extends roughly from mid-April to mid-May and includes travel to sites such as Apollo's oracle at Delphi, the sacred island of Delos, and Greek cities along the Aegean coast of Turkey. See Program in Greece under Undergraduate Curriculum for more information. Offered only in Greece and Turkey. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    GKCV 203, ART 203, SOAN 203
  • SOAN 204: Greece in Byzantine-Medieval Ages
    On-site study of the Byzantine Era in the Greek world. The course extends roughly from mid-May to early June, with travel to sites such as Ephesus, the Byzantine cities of Mistra and Monemvasia, and the monasteries of Meteora. See Program in Greece under Undergraduate Curriculum for more information. Offered only in Greece and Turkey. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    GKCV 204, ART 204, CLAS 204
  • SOAN 205: Archaeological Field School
    Archaeological Field School introduces students to the discipline of archaeology, with an emphasis on fieldwork and excavation. Students will serve as the field crew on an archaeological dig in Chicago, with lectures, readings, workshops, and field trips providing the theoretical and historical context for the archaeological methods. Students will learn excavation, recording, laboratory and analytical techniques via some traditional coursework, but most significantly, through participation. Students will have the opportunity to experiment with these techniques, discuss the implications of their findings, and compare them with the research and ideas of professional archaeologists. No prerequisites.
    AMER 208
  • SOAN 208: Sociology of Terrorism
    Terrorism has been part of the Western consciousness since the rise of anarchism a century ago. Events of September 11th, 2001, brought a new urgency to the examination of the global circumstances and forces that have given rise to the present brand of transnational and global terrorism. The newest mode of this phenomenon is visible in the public propaganda of ISIL and its affiliates in West Asia and North Africa. This course concentrates on sociological perspectives regarding specific traditions that have fostered terrorist ideologies and practices. The varieties of terrorism to be examined in this course include Christian (in the United States and Europe), Islamic (Shiite or Sunni branches), Buddhist, Sikh/Hindu, and secular terrorism of the left and the right. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    IREL 275
  • SOAN 209: Social Construction of Modern World
    The course will investigate aspects of social life that are taken for granted, but will be shown to be both historically and culturally specific to the modern American milieu. Topics may include childhood, love as the basis for marriage, private life, leisure, monogamy, prison, family. No prerequisites.

  • SOAN 210: Principles of Social Organization
    This course examines patterns that occur in human interaction - at both micro and macro scales. Focus is placed upon a process understanding of society. Topics include the generation of a shared reality, production of culture, types of relationships and their key features, predictable patterns of organization and their internal dynamics, as well as social universals such as conflict, change, and resource allocation. Prerequisite: Sociology and Anthropology 110. Enrollment priority given to departmental majors and minors. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • SOAN 215: Archaeological Field Methods
    Archaeological Field Methods introduces students to the discipline of archaeology, with an emphasis on fieldwork and excavation. Students will serve as the field crew on an archaeological dig in Lake Forest, with lectures, readings, workshops, and field trips providing the theoretical and historical context for the archaeological methods. Students will learn excavation, recording, laboratory and analytical techniques via some traditional coursework, but most significantly, through participation. Students will have the opportunity to experiment with these techniques, discuss the implications of their findings, and compare them with the research and ideas of professional archaeologists. No prerequisites. Corequisites: This course has an additional weekly lab session (2 hrs). Not open to students who have taken SOAN 205.
    AMER 215
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  • SOAN 216: Introduction to Archaeology
    This course is an introduction to the anthropological subfield of archaeology, its practices, methods, and the political and social issues that arise when we study human pasts. The course considers the history of the discipline and its theoretical underpinnings, then looks at how archaeologists create research designs, discover and excavate sites, analyze artifacts and features, and disseminate their findings. It also introduces a series of spatiotemporally diverse archaeological case studies, calling on the students' understanding of basic archaeological concepts while emphasizing the ways that archaeological practice and museum display necessarily engage with political and social movements. Special attention is paid to how the archaeological record captures experiences of people of color, women, working class people, and those who are not literate. Multiple examples interpreted via material remains introduce students to the complexity of human experiences within a framework of cultural relativism. Field projects, in-class activities, and films supplement traditional lectures.
  • SOAN 217: Sociology of Work
    (Offered Less Frequently)The meaning of work, with emphasis on sociological concepts such as stratification, power, quality of life, and organization in the social world. Focus will be both on cross-cultural comparisons of the social definition of work and on the organization of work in the United States including types of occupations, power distribution within occupations, and changes in the workforce. Participant-observer studies will provide comparisons of the work worlds of pink-, blue-, and white-collar workers. Prerequisite: Sociology and Anthropology 110. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • SOAN 220: Domains of Human Evidence
    Anthropology literally translates to the study of man, and the discipline takes humankind as its object. This course explores the four distinct ways in which anthropologists have sought to understand humans: 1) as animals whose potential and limits are set by their physiological qualities (physical anthropology); 2) as material workers who shape and are shaped by their environment and who leave their mark on the landscape (archaeology); 3) as cultural creatures who collectively produce ways of interacting with and imposing meaning on the world and one another (socio/cultural anthropology); 4) as language bearers who mediate their experience with complex grammars and symbol systems (linguistic anthropology). These domains of evidence are key to developing an in depth understanding of what anthropology can do, and this course is foundational for upper level anthropology courses. Prerequisite: Sociology and Anthropology 110. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • SOAN 221: Cultures of Modern Africa
    Introduction to contemporary rural and urban society in sub-Saharan Africa, drawing on materials from all major regions of the subcontinent. Particular emphasis will be on problems of rural development, rural-urban migration, and structural changes of economic, political, and social formations in the various new nations. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    AFAM 221, IREL 271
  • SOAN 222: Religion and Society
    'Religion and Society' is designed as an academic gateway to the study of religion from the point of view of social sciences and humanities. It will familiarize students with theoretical frameworks that are used in sociology, anthropology and history for the study of the connections of the institution of religion to historical processes, vicissitudes of social class, structures of political domination and the contingencies of economic modes of production. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement.)
  • SOAN 225: Historic Artifact Analysis
    (Historic Artifact Analysis: Artifacts of Modernity.) This hands-on course introduces archaeological laboratory methods and accompanying archival and research-based techniques for interpreting these "artifacts of modernity": excavated materials from ongoing archaeological projects of historic-period sites in the Chicago area. Students will be exposed to various stages of artifact processing on a collection from a recently excavated site, including: washing, sorting, identification, data entry, analysis, report preparation, and curation. Students will learn how to identify 19th- and 20th-century artifacts--American, British, French, Japanese, Chinese, and other--representing a broad range of materials from the daily lives of past peoples/past societies. The artifact analysis will allow students to develop skills useful for museum, laboratory, and/or archaeological settings. Prerequisite: SOAN 205 OR SOAN 215 OR SOAN 220 OR consent of instructor. Corequisite: This course has an additional weekly lab session (2 hrs).
    AMER 229
  • SOAN 230: Anthropology of Sports
    This course examines Americans' cultural construction of sports vis-a- vis other cultural conceptions, including the dominance of sports in religious, philosophical and governmental domains. We transition from our cross-cultural overview to focus on the Western conceit of mind-body dualism and its effects. This dualism makes sports a site for the reproduction of existing power dynamics of race and gender, but it also makes sports a realm of liberatory potential (cf Jackie Robinson, Title IX). Students in this course should expect to follow sports events throughout the semester and should be prepared for field assignments. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement.)
  • SOAN 231: Histories & Cultures Latin America
    This course introduces students to modern historical, ethnohistorical, and anthropological approaches to the indigenous populations of Latin America. The course will focus on the conflict and crisis that have characterized the relationship between the native inhabitants of the New World and the Old World immigrants and their descendants whose presence has forever changed the Americas. This conflict, and the cultures that emerged from it, will be traced both historically (starting with the 'conquest') and regionally, focusing on four distinct areas: central Mexico; Guatemala and Chiapas; the Andes; and the Amazon. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    LNAM 231, IREL 272
  • SOAN 235: Racism and Ethnic Relations
    This course surveys of the development of the theories of race and ethnic relations at the individual, group, and cultural levels. Students will examine the impact these theories have had on social policy. The course focuses on the experience of Asians, Latinos and African Americans with special attention given to institutional expressions of oppression in American Society. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    AMER 235
  • SOAN 237: City, Space and Place
    City, Space and Place focuses on the anthropology and sociology of the urban experience. This course will draw on a broad range of materials to familiarize students with theoretical frameworks that are used for the study of social structures and processes, cultural systems and practices, and the role of the city in the organization and production of human experiences, particularly during the last two centuries. Not open to students who have already completed SOAN 189. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement)
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  • SOAN 239: Social Movements and Society
    Social movements have contributed to significant changes in modern society. The civil rights movement brought greater equality to African Americans; the Women's Liberation movement created an expansion of rights for women; anti-war and disarmament protests contributed to the end of the Vietnam war and the end of the arms race; and the environmental movement drew our attention to deforestation, climate change, and species loss. This course examines why people participate in social movements, when social movements emerge, which social movements succeed or fail in mobilizing constituents, how they are organized, how mass media influences movements, and why movements ultimately decline. Special attention will be paid to how social movements influence and are influenced by the social context in which they emerge, with the goal of better understanding a significant force of societal change. Prerequisite: SOAN 110.
  • SOAN 240: Deviance
    How society defines deviants - its outcasts and outsiders - and how the people so defined respond to this categorization; the nature of normal and abnormal, legal and illegal. Do these categories have absolute moral meaning, or do they always depend on the particular society and era in which they are defined? Topics to be addressed include stigma and stereotyping, cross-cultural variations in gender roles, the status of the inmate, deviance as blocked opportunity, and the political mobilization of outsiders. Prerequisite: Sociology and Anthropology 110. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • SOAN 242: Cults, Sects, and Communes
    This course provides an introduction to the study of new religious movements, popularly called sects and cults, and the communal movements that are their more secularized cousins. We will consider several case studies and examine the wider phenomenon of such groups in the modern world. We will pay attention to the traditional sociological issues of leadership, charisma, conversion, and belief maintenance, as well as the lived practices and experiences of members of such groups, such as rituals, gender practices, and holidays. No prerequisites.

    RELG 242
  • SOAN 244: Anthropology of Education
    For the anthropologist, education is the mechanism of socialreproduction, a strategy not limited to schooling but in fact encompassing a person's entire life. For much of the world, the privileging of schooling as a site of education has had real ramifications on the possibility of maintaining cultural forms that go against the pressures of globalization and capitalism. This course opens with a broad consideration of education before focusing on schooling as the preferred institutional form of education under early 21st century globalism. Our questions will include both how schooling operates to maintain existing social structures and power relations and the possibilities - and consequences - of schools as a site of change. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    EDUC 244
  • SOAN 245: Medical Anthropology
    This course approaches various aspects of medicine and disease from an anthropological perspective and from outside the framework of standard biomedical concepts. We will look at how experiences of illness and health are culturally, rather than biologically, constructed. A second objective is to compare the belief systems and medical practices of several specific Western and non-Western societies. In carrying out these cross-cultural comparisons, we will focus on qualitative research and read several ethnographic case studies. Prerequisite: Sociology and Anthropology 110. (Meets the GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • SOAN 246: Language and Culture
    This course is an introduction to and survey of Linguistic Anthropology, one of the four primary subfields within the broader discipline of anthropology. Linguistic anthropology requires competence in several areas that encompass scientific and humanistic approaches to the study of language. Students will acquire a broad grasp of critical issues in language and culture including by grappling with such questions as: What is language? Does language shape our intuition of the world? How might it affect our thoughts and behavior? What does color have to do with language and how can color terms tell us about our limits of awareness of the way that culture shapes us? How do we do things with words? What role do groups and social norms play in how we speak? How creative can we be with language? What is verbal art? How does language operate within actual communities, for instance serving to support and maintain traditional cultural practices or fostering distinctions between kinds of persons in society? (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • SOAN 247: Anthropology of Pacific Islands
    This course is intended to provide an ethnographic and historical overview of classic and contemporary directions of anthropological research in the eastern Pacific. The primary course goal is to develop n ethnographic and historical appreciation for Polynesian culture at the three points of the Polynesian triangle. We will work toward this goal by a focused examination of the cultures of particular island groups in the eastern Pacific. En route, students will be introduced to issues as diverse as Polynesian voyaging and myths, and the ways that traditional cultural beliefs and practices and the social institutions in which they coalesce such as chieftanship, kinship and adoption are subject to historical change. We will pay particular attention to the distinct expressions of social relationships and cultural forms that developed under varying conditions across the region. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ASIA 247
  • SOAN 248: Intro to Physical Anthropology
    This course will introduce students to the discipline of biological/physical anthropology. The course will look at both the commonalities that hominids, and particularly humans, share with other biological organisms and idiosyncratic phenomena that make the human species unique. Students will first be introduced to the evolutionary and biological mechanisms that have guided the emergence of the human lineage and to the practices of taxonomy and phylogeny which inform the study of human biological ancestry. Next, the class will focus on the study of modern primates, humanity's closest living relatives. We will then move to the particular evolutionary history of hominids that produced modern humans. Through this course students will become conversant with the overarching questions and biological techniques employed in the study of both ancient humans and modern human variation. This course will directly engage students in anthropological work in both reading and practice and teach the methods used by anthropologists in their fieldwork.
  • SOAN 250: Globalization of Culture & Society
    This course is an introduction to the study of contemporary diversity of human cultures. In the process of studying the peoples of the world, we will investigate various social scientific perspectives as they have developed in recent years in response to the increasing significance of globalization in local cultures. By better understanding the values and beliefs of members of other societies, we will be able to gain a more insightful understanding of our own and come to better appreciate the ways in which our own culture subtly shapes our perceptions of the world. Concepts of race, ethnicity, and identity will be considered, as well as the theme of communication across cultural boundaries. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    IREL 274
  • SOAN 251: Intro Performance Studies
    In this course, we will explore the flourishing new discipline of Performance Studies. This field of study began as a collaboration between theater director and theorist Richard Schechner and anthropologist Victor Turner, combining Schechner's interest in 'aesthetic performance' (theater, dance, music, performance art) with Turner's interest in performance as ritual within indigenous cultures, or (as Erving Goffman has written) 'the presentation of self in everyday life.' Performance Studies often stresses the importance of intercultural performance as an alternative to either traditional proscenium theatre or traditional anthropological fieldwork. In addition to the above and other authors, the course will include in-class performance exercises along with field trips to performances in Chicago. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement. )
    THTR 251
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  • SOAN 253: Family and Kinship
    This course focuses on family and kinship in cross-cultural perspective. We will look at families in their social and cultural context and ask what relationships exist between family forms, practices, and values and the economic system, political organization, religions, and cultures of the larger community. We will also ask what the sources of love and support, as well as conflict and tension, are within families and among kin, and we will question why family forms and ideal family types change over time. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    GSWS 253
  • SOAN 260: History of Social Thought
    This course will examine some of the classical sources of social thought both in the East and the West. Texts by Plato, Aristotle, St. Augustine, Aquinas, Alfarabi, Confucius, authors of the Vedas, Machiavelli, Hobbes, and Rousseau will be examined for the seeds of questions that were later to grow into the thicket of sociological problematics. Extensive weekly readings of original sources will be the basis of class discussions. Prerequisite: Sociology and Anthropology 110. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • SOAN 271: Technology and Human Values
    Conditions and processes of industrialization in the Western world; problems related to economic development in emerging nations; impact of industry on lifeways of modern humans. Prerequisite: Sociology and Anthropology 110. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    ES 271
  • SOAN 273: Cultural Ecology of Africa
    In this course, we will study the relationships between African peoples and their environments. We will consider the process of globalization and its relationship to the changing landscape of Africa in a historical context. By combining environmental studies and anthropology, we will bring a unique perspective to our study of the historical interaction of African cultures and environments, from pre-colonial times through the colonial period to the current post-colonial period. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement.)
    ES 273, IREL 273
  • SOAN 275: Ritual in Contemporary America
    This course examines how ceremonies, festivals and other performative events enrich and define community. This study of ritual may include street fairs, parades, weddings, funerals, feasts and fasts as well as other public and private behaviors that comprise the diversity of American ritual life. Our course shall explore ritual as it occurs in many of the ethnic, racial, subcultural and countercultural communities in Chicago. We will investigate and attempt to understand both the invention and re-invention of community and personal identity through ritual action. Students should anticipate frequent field trips. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    AMER 213, THTR 235
  • SOAN 280: Gender, Culture, and Society
    Theories concerning the acquisition of sex-typed behavior; social and biological influences on the roles of males and females in the twentieth- century United States as well as in other cultures. Feminist and anti-feminist perspectives. Images of future lifestyles and implications for social policy. Prerequisite: SOAN 110. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    GSWS 280
  • SOAN 286: Soc Structure & Culture thru Film
    (Social Structure and Culture Through Film) This course combines a historical survey of narrative films and an overview of international schools of filmmaking and couches them in a sociological framework. The questions of treatment of the other (races and nations), totalitarianism, revolution, militarism, deviance, various views of human nature, and utopias and distopias portrayed in cinema will be addressed. Prerequisite: Sociology and Anthropology 110. Required: an additional weekly lab session for viewing movies. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.) Not open to students who have completed SOAN 285.
  • SOAN 290: Social Problems & Social Policy
    The course tracks the shifting sociological understanding of social problems in the United States and the implications for research and policy. Specifically, emphasis is placed on a balance between theoretical understandings and empirical investigation on topics ranging from family to the environment. Prerequisite: Sociology and Anthropology 110. Enrollment priority given to departmental majors and minors.
  • SOAN 302: Sexuality and Society
    This course is a cross-cultural examination of perceptions and practices of sex and sexuality. We will begin with a brief overview of some archaeological findings and their implications, after which we will go on to address sexual practices in history and modern times both in the United States and other areas of the world. We will study economic, cultural, political, and religious influences on sexual thought and practice. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    GSWS 302
  • SOAN 310: Social Rsch:Quantitative Methods
    This course provides an introduction to the relationship between theoretical models and empirical investigations of social action. The focus of the course is the selection of a problem for investigation, choice of appropriate quantitative methodology, design and implementation of a social research project, and final data analysis. Data analysis techniques include multivariate analysis, elaboration modeling and social science computer skills using the SPSS program. Recommended for junior year. Prerequisite: SOAN 110 AND any SOAN 200-level elective, both with a grade of C or better. Required: an additional weekly lab session.
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  • SOAN 315: Soc Ethics Energy Production & Use
    Course description: the course will explore the ethical implications of possible future energy initiatives. Emphasis will be given to the global implications of interdependency on primary resources and the technological initiatives of nuclear power and alternative sources. Students will focus on independent research projects, with both domestic and international components, surrounding the environmental, social, and ethical issues of future energy production and use. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor.
    ES 315, PHIL 315
  • SOAN 316: Environmental Sociology
    This course utilizes the sociological perspective to explore the complex ways that human society and nature are intertwined, having significant impacts on each other. How societies are organized, how they produce and consume, and what values and norms constitute their culture all have varied impacts on what is often referred to as the 'natural' world. As environmental problems - such as climate change, deforestation, species loss, pollution, etc. - are constructed and emerge, the impact on societies varies greatly across social groups based on race, class, gender, and national context. This course explores how, in the face of environmental degradation, society has responded in different ways: with social mov