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Communications and Marketing

Alum Josh Moulton featured in Crain’s

Crain’s Chicago Business reports that In-flight internet provider Gogo commissioned two paintings from Josh Moulton ’00 for its Chicago headquarters.

Josh Moulton and Gogo’s Michael Small

When Chicago artist Josh Moulton met Gogo Chief Executive Michael Small at a technology event at 1871, the tech incubator inside the Merchandise Mart, they stayed in touch via email. Months later, Small asked Moulton—who regularly paints Chicago-centric scenes for corporate clients such as Deloitte, PWC and McDonald’s—to add local flavor to a company conference room.

For Small, Moulton created two paintings that show Gogo’s exterior (and prominent signage) among the other downtown high-rises. Moulton began the process by taking photos of the exterior views and painting to scale from the photographs. The turnaround took about a month, because he had to capture el tracks, bridges and building facades. “Each (painting) has a ton of little windows,” says Moulton, 39, who runs a storefront gallery in Lincoln Park featuring his paintings and prints.

Small says he commissioned the work because it helps employees understand how the in-flight internet-connection company contributes to the fabric of Chicago. “The idea was to make our building prominent, but in the context of the city,” he says. “If you wanted to, you could give a city tour right from the painting.”

Moulton says the corporate relationships help keep him afloat as an artist. He often provides a selection of photographs to clients and asks them which images they’d like him to depict. Most are scenes of Chicago. “That’s what really sells,” he adds.

–Crain’s Chicago Business