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Communications and Marketing

Dollars and sense

Miles Kimball, a well-known economics research expert, shared his thoughts on electronic money, inflation, and recessions during an on-campus lecture on September 1.

The professor of economics and survey research at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, talked about how it’s necessary that electronic money (the money people keep in their banks, rather than cash in their wallets) becomes legal tender.

“Paper money ties the hands of the Federal Reserve in battling recessions,” Kimball told the audience in the Lily Reid Holt Memorial Chapel during the evening talk. He came to the College at the invitation of Assistant Professor of Economics and Business Aneeqa Aqeel, who studied macroeconomics with Kimball while working on her PhD at Michigan.

Kimball is the first of many outside experts scheduled to speak during coming months at Lake Forest, a top college in the country. Click here to apply.