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Communications and Marketing

Fatal fire serves as holiday inspiration

The New York Times featured the Chicago holiday play Burning Bluebeard, “a joyful eulogy” written by adjunct theater professor Jay Torrence.

Torrence, who teaches advanced playwrighting, based his script on the real-life story of a fire that killed 600 people, mostly children and their mothers, at Chicago’s Iroquois Theater in 1903.

“Such a tragedy wouldn’t appear to be the stuff of holiday custom, but that’s what Burning Bluebeard—with its vaudeville-style tumbling, silly humor and Amy Winehouse lip-sync number—has become here since its 2011 premiere,” The New York Times reports. 

Click here to read the article.