Course Descriptions

  • LNAM 202: Chicago: Global/Neighborhood City
    'Chicago: Global City/City of Neighborhoods' recognizes that Chicago is both a global and a 'local' city. On the one hand, the city is involved in manufacturing, trade, and services on a worldwide basis. On the other hand, Chicago is a city of neighborhoods, often based on strong ethnic and racial identities. The course examines the city's dual quality by studying the interconnections between the world economy and the daily life of Chicagoans. A key connection is immigration, which we shall explore from the standpoint of several important communities, including, most prominently, Hispanics/Latinos (given our joint expertise in Spanish and Latin American Studies), as well as African-Americans, Eastern Europeans, and Asians. The course will take both an historical and contemporary approach, as we analyze how the city developed economically, politically, and culturally since the late 19th century, as well as how the city is adjusting today in an age of globalization. No prerequisite. Cross-listed in American Studies, Latin American Studies, Politics, Spanish, and serves as an elective for Urban Studies. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: POLS 239, SPAN 202, AMER 226
  • Offered this year
    LNAM 219: Politics of Latin America
    An introduction to politics and social change in Latin America. Study will focus on several Latin American countries and on special topics such as human rights, religion, the military, land reform, women, and population policy. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: POLS 219
  • Offered this year
    LNAM 226: Colonial Latin American Art
    This course will consider the arts of Central and South America from the conquest to independence (ca. 1500-1850) and will explore the intersections among art, culture, and power in the specific conditions of Colonial Latin America. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement).
    Cross-listed as: ARTH 226
  • LNAM 245: Child Labor in Latin America
    Explores the role of child labor in the economies of developing Latin American countries, focusing on the question 'Do countries need to use child labor to industrialize?' Historically, industrialized countries have relied heavily on children to work in factories and mines. Today it appears history is repeating itself as developing countries utilize children in the informal sectors. The employment of children in Brazil, Colombia, Peru, Chile, and Argentina will be examined in detail. The economic, political, social/cultural, and technological explanations for child labor will be explored for each country. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.) Prerequisite: ECON 110.
    Cross-listed as: ECON 245
  • Offered this year
    LNAM 257: History of Mexico
    This course broadly surveys Mexican history from the pre-Conquest period to the Chiapas revolt in 1994. The meaning of progress, the sacred and indigenous culture, imperialism's impact, and popular mobilization are among its recurring themes. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: HIST 272
  • Offered this year
    LNAM 280: The Mexican-American Border
    As the only place where the third world and first world touch, the Mexican-American border is unique. This course will focus on the border and how its unique location in the world has created a culture, language, politics, religion and economy that reflect the interdependence between these two neighboring countries. The course will begin with the history of the border from the Gadsden Purchase in 1854 to the passage of NAFTA in 2004 and then examine the impact of free trade on Mexico. The course will explore how people (immigration - both legal and illegal), resources (oil, workers), consumer products (household appliances, food, music, and art), environmental waste (toxic waste, water and air pollution) and technology (outsourcing) cross borders as globalization impacts both Mexicans and Americans. The course involves a three-week stay along the border in May. Pre-requisites: ECON 110 and SPAN 112 or its equivalent. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: IREL 280, BUSN 280, ECON 280, SPAN 201
  • LNAM 302: The Latin American World

  • LNAM 304: Cocina y Cultura y Literatura
    Cocina y cultura y literatura (Cuisine, Culture and Literature) is an immersion type course in which students read fiction and poetry about food. They research and debate ethical and social issues, such as genetic modification of plants, food distribution, hunger, malnutrition, obesity, and anorexia. The students will be responsible for preparing authentic dishes and explaining their cultural significance to the class. Excursions might include visits to a local Hispanic market, a Spanish-speaking soup kitchen, ethnic restaurants, or homes of native Spanish speakers. Prerequisite: Spanish 212. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: SPAN 304
  • LNAM 306: Intro Latin American Culture
    This course will be taught in Spanish. It is designed to provide an introductory overview of Latin America's development focusing on its cultural manifestations through time. Films, music, and art will supplement readings for a better understanding of the cultural heterogeneity of Latin America, its past, and its present reality. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: SPAN 306
  • LNAM 319: Continuing Portuguese
    (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
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  • Offered this year
    LNAM 322: Emerging Markets Analysis
    Analysis of emerging markets of East Asia and Latin America, paying particular attention to growth strategies and the impact of market reforms, financial markets development, and foreign capital flows on economic performance of these countries. The course relies on case studies from Asian countries of China, South Korea, Thailand, Singapore, and Hong Kong and Latin American economies of Brazil, Argentina, Mexico, and Chile. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.) Prerequisite: ECON 220.
    Cross-listed as: BUSN 322, ASIA 322
  • Offered this year
    LNAM 325: U.S. Latino Literature
    This course is taught in Spanish. It is designed to familiarize students with the cultural phenomena produced in the United States by the presence of two major Hispanic groups: Mexican Americans (20.6 million) and Puerto Ricans (3.4 million). The course will examine the historical, political, and cultural development of the Mexican American/Chicano and the Puerto Rican/Boricua Hispanic heritage. The main objective is to provide the students with an overall social and literary understanding and to recognize the cultural contribution made by these two important Hispanic groups. Topics such as neo-colonialism, popular culture, national identity, gender representation in art and literature, religious syncretism, and economic impact on the workforce will be explored. Literary texts by outstanding Chicano and Boricua authors will be included. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: SPAN 325
  • Offered this year
    LNAM 333: Cine e Historia en América Latina
    The course examines the ways that movies view historical events and periods, while at the same time shaping public perception of those events and periods in Latin America. Examples of topics are the Conquest of the Americas, the legacy of Peron, the Castro and post-Castro eras in Cuba, the Catholic Church in Mexico, dictatorship and democracy in Brazil and Chile, and narco-trafficking. The basic format will be discussion with occasional interactive lectures. Readings will include essays on cinema and history. Students will view films mostly in DVD format from several countries. Assignments will include short essays, oral presentations, and a midterm and a final exam. (Counts toward the Spanish major and minor. Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: SPAN 333
  • Offered this year
    LNAM 334: Cine Espanol
    An interdisciplinary study of Spanish film, from multiple perspectives: artistic, historical, political, and socio-economic. This course will highlight the artistic achievements of Spanish filmmakers from several periods, including Luis Buñuel, Carlos Saura, and Pedro Almodovar. Readings will include essays on film history, the language of cinema, movie reviews, and interviews with directors. The course will scrutinize the links among cultural phenomena, socio-political events, and the art of filmmaking. Films will be treated as complex aesthetic objects whose language does not merely photograph socio-historical reality but transfigures it. The course will also consider Spain in its broadest Iberian sense and will include films in Catalan, Galician, and Portuguese. Classes will be based mainly on discussion interspersed with occasional lectures. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: SPAN 334
  • Offered this year
    LNAM 338: Cine Latinoamericano
    An interdisciplinary study of Latin American film, from multiple perspectives: artistic, historical, political, and socio-economic. This course will highlight the artistic achievements of Latin American filmmakers from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico. We will use selected readings from original works for films that are based on fiction. A number of films have been Academy Award nominees or winners. Further readings will include a history of Latin American cinema, movie reviews, and interviews with directors. The course will scrutinize the links among cultural phenomena, socio-political events, and the art of filmmaking. Films will be treated as complex aesthetic objects whose language does not merely photograph socio-historical reality but transfigures it. Classes will be based mainly on discussion interspersed with occasional lectures. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: SPAN 338
  • LNAM 345: Latino Identities in Chicago
    (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • LNAM 380: Cine, Literatura y Sociedad Amr Lat
    (Cine, Literatura y Sociedad en America Latina) This course is an interdisciplinary study of Latin American societies, focusing on film and literature from multiple perspectives: artistic, historical, political, and socio-economic. The seminar will highlight the magisterial artistic achievements of Latin American novelists, short story writers, and playwrights and film adaptations of their works. It will scrutinize the links between socio-political events and artistic production. Seminar materials will include films, chapters from novels, short stories, plays, and readings on film, social issues, and politics. The basic format will be discussion with occasional interactive lectures. Assignments will include short essays, oral presentations, and a final exam. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: SPAN 380
  • LNAM 382: Econ Policy Making in Lat Am

  • LNAM 400: Women's Voices in Latin America
    An author, thinker, movement, or group of works studied in depth. All work in Spanish. This course will examine the role of women in Hispanic culture. Important figures such as La Malinche, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, and Eva Peron as well as the fiction, poetry, and films of Rosario Castellanos, Clarice Lispector, Gabriela Mistral, Isabel Allende, Rigoberta Menchu, Maria Luisa Bember, and Alicia Steimberg will be studied. Prerequisite: a 300-level Spanish course. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: SPAN 400, GSWS 400
  • LNAM 470: Latin American Global Business
    Emphasizes analytic activities and case problems for corporate and entrepreneurial organizations operating or considering operations in Latin America. Economic theories, statistical tests, accounting records, financial analysis, and marketing concepts will be used to investigate business situations. (May be taken by business and international relations majors to meet GEC Senior Studies Requirement. Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement if not used for GEC Senior Studies Requirement.) Prerequisites: BUSN 130 (or BUSN 180), BUSN 230, ECON 210, ECON 220, and FIN 210 (or FIN 237); or permission of instructor for Latin American Studies majors.
    Cross-listed as: BUSN 470
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