Course Descriptions

 

Arabic Courses

  • ARBC 110: Beginning Arabic I
    Students will learn to read, write and understand Modern Standard Literary Arabic, and to use the language in basic conversation, including exchanging courtesies, meeting people, asking questions and providing information.
  • ARBC 112: Beginning Arabic II
    Students will continue to learn to read, write and speak basic Modern Standard Literary Arabic in a variety of cultural situations.
  • ARBC 210: Intermediate Arabic
    Students will advance their knowledge of reading, writing and speaking basic Modern Literary Arabic as well as their understanding of the use of language in cultural context.
  • ARBC 212: Advanced Intermediate Arabic
    Students will continue to advance their knowledge of reading, writing and speaking basic Modern Literary Arabic as well as their understanding of the use of language in cultural context.

 

Chinese Courses

  • CHIN 110: Beginning Chinese I
    This course is an introduction to the forms of spoken Chinese. Most of the fundamental structures are covered in Chinese 110 and 112, together with writing practice. 112 is a continuation of 110. Lab work is an integral part of the sequence.
    Cross-listed as: ASIA 110
  • CHIN 112: Beginning Chinese II
    This course is an introduction to the forms of spoken Chinese. Most of the fundamental structures are covered in Chinese 110 and 112, together with writing practice. 112 is a continuation of 110. Lab work is an integral part of the sequence.
    Cross-listed as: ASIA 112
  • CHIN 210: Intermediate Chinese
    This course will continue the fundamentals of Chinese conversation begun in the first-year series, Chinese 110 and 112, and continue work on reading and writing the language. Extensive oral practice and conversation exercises are stressed. Classes will be supplemented with laboratory exercises and written work.
    Cross-listed as: ASIA 210
  • CHIN 212: Advanced Intermediate Chinese
    This is the second course in intermediate Chinese. It focuses on further developments of the four language skills to support sustained oral and written performance at the intermediate level to prepare students for third year Chinese study. The focus will be on oral expression with expanding vocabulary, enhancing understanding of grammar, and introducing more complex structures and texts.
    Cross-listed as: ASIA 212
  • CHIN 230: East Asian Lit in Translation
    (East Asian Literature in Translation taught in English). This course is an introduction to traditional East Asian literature with the primary focus on China, Japan and Korea. It will concentrate on several themes, topics, authors and representative works of traditional Chinese, Japanese and Korean literature; emphasis on critical reading. This course will provide the students an opportunity to enjoy the most well known poems, novels and short stories produced by the prominent authors of the genres. Prerequisites: No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: ASIA 230
  • CHIN 251: Intro to Chinese Literature in Engl
    (Introduction to Chinese Literature in English) This course will introduce students to Chinese literature through representative works of philosophy, poetry, folklore and modern short stories. The goal of this course is twofold: to grant students glimpses into the rich repertoire of Chinese literature and hence insights into the fundamental humanistic traditions of China; and to develop a set of skills of literary analysis. No knowledge of Chinese language or prior coursework on Chinese culture is required. Taught in English. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: ASIA 251
  • CHIN 260: Intro to Chinese Culture in English
    This course will explore elements of Contemporary Chinese culture and themes related to living, studying or working in China, as seen in films, videos, internet sources, and selected fiction and non-fiction texts. Topics covered include China's diverse geography, peoples and cuisine, doing business in China, the societal role of Chinese medicine, festivals and weddings, interpreting folk and contemporary art forms, current trends and themes in popular culture. This course will be taught in English. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: ASIA 260
  • CHIN 312: Chinese Oral & Written Proficiency
    This course is a continuation of Chinese 212. The focus will be on oral and written expression in cultural context, expanding vocabulary and enhancing understanding of Chinese grammar. Chinese idiomatic expressions and various aspects of Chinese culture will also be explored throughout the course. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: ASIA 312
  • CHIN 313: Business Chinese
    This course develops students' Chinese proficiency in a business environment. Students continue to develop an adequate set of language skills in a communicative context while being aware of Chinese socio-cultural issues. It includes a concurrent emphasis on business terminology, conducting business negotiations, reading newspapers, magazines, and other business-related documents, and understanding economic trends and situations in modern China. Particularly recommended for students who are thinking of careers in economics, business, politics, and international relations. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: ASIA 313
  • CHIN 333: Chinese Cinema
    This course provides a historical, critical, and theoretical survey of Chinese cinema, broadly defined to include films from Mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. We will look at the specific political, social, economic, technological and aesthetic factors that have influenced the shape and character of Chinese cinema over the last century. We will discuss a range of works by internationally directors, including Zhang Yimou, Feng Xiaogang, Stephen Chow, Ang Lee, etc. As this course serves as a general introduction to Chinese film, it is intended for students who have little or no knowledge of China. All films screened for the course have English subtitles, so no knowledge of the Chinese language is required.
    Cross-listed as: ASIA 333
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Foreign Civilizations Courses

  • FRCV 333: Exploring French Culture thru Film
    This course examines contemporary French cultural perceptions through a variety of cinematic examples taken from French films. Cultural analysis will include discussions of French history, literature, politics, geography, and music. In addition, the topic of 'remaking culture' through film is addressed, as the current wave of cinematic remakes invites cross-cultural comparisons between the United States and France. The course will examine major French directors and their cinematic portrayals of the French, as well as documentaries and filmed interviews, and will analyze the 'authenticity' of the portrait they produce of French society. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. This course is taught in English. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: FREN 333
  • FRCV 334: Exploring French Lit thru Film
    This course will examine French literary works, both historical and contemporary, through a variety of cinematic examples taken from French films. This course will compare the expression of theme, character, and plot structure in written literature (plays and narratives) and in corresponding cinematic adaptations. The course will also address whether the author's literary style is reflected in or displaced by the cinematic style of French 'auteurs' (film directors) studied. The question of translation across genres (literature to film), across language and culture (example of American remakes), and across history (a historical period depicted in a modern cinematic era) will also be discussed. This course is taught in English. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement. )
    Cross-listed as: FREN 334
  • FRCV 400: French Society & Culture
    (Paris, France) This course will combine classroom study with visits to cultural, political, educational, and economic institutions. It is organized along thematic lines to deal with such topics as the French political tradition, education in modern France, the French economy in the European Economic Community, religion in France, and the Parisian metropolis. (Offered only in Paris. Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)

 

French Courses

  • FREN 110: Beginning French I
    French 110 is designed to develop the student's ability to aurally comprehend, speak, read, and write basic controlled patterns of the French language.
  • FREN 112: Beginning French II
    French 112 is a continuation of 110 and culminates in readings, class discussions, and free composition to provide facility with the spoken and written language and insight into its structure. Prerequisite for French 112: placement recommendation or a grade of C or better in French 110.
  • FREN 210: Interm French: Cultural Emphasis
    A course designed to afford the student a systematic review of all the basic elements of French grammar, implemented with culture-based readings and exercises, with a view to preparing the student for more sophisticated courses in language, literature, and culture. Classroom work supplemented by laboratory exercises. Prerequisite: French 112 or the equivalent of one year of college French and placement recommendation.
  • FREN 212: Advanced Intermediate French
    A course designed to initiate the student to critical reading and thematic discussion of selected works of French fiction and expository prose. This course includes a strong emphasis on writing; a review of grammar topics, vocabulary building, and the organization and presentation of ideas in written form in French will be emphasized through a variety of writing assignments related to the literature studied. Prerequisite: French 210 or placement recommendation.
  • FREN 220: Conversation & Composition
    Oral work for the student already possessing a working knowledge of French grammar. This course is designed to improve the linguistic competence of the student on several levels: practical necessities, social situations, and exchange of ideas. Sketches, exposes, dialogues, and discussions will constitute the bulk of classroom activities. Prerequisite: French 212 or equivalent.
  • FREN 265: Albert Camus: Philos of the Absurd
    (Albert Camus: Philosophy of the Absurd) A study of Camus's philosophy of the absurd as presented in his writings from the individualistic revolt of The Stranger to the collective revolt expressed in The Plague. Camus's view of the conscience of modern humanity in The Fall also will be addressed. The evolution of Camus's style will be studied in the six short stories presented in Exile and the Kingdom. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • FREN 300: Intro Reading Literature in French
    This course is designed to prepare students for serious reading and analysis of literary texts in French. It is an introduction to the concepts of literary criticism and explication de texte and will familiarize the student with the vocabulary of literary analysis. The texts are chosen from the three major literary genres: poetry, prose, and drama. All lectures, discussions, and assignments are in French. Prerequisite: French 212. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • FREN 301: Medieval to Romantic
    A topical survey of major French writers and literary movements from the medieval to the Romantic period. Readings may be chosen to focus attention on a particular theme or problem linking different periods and styles. Among the authors studied: Villon, Rabelais, Montaigne, Pascal, Descartes, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau. Prerequisite: French 212. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • FREN 302: Modern Period
    A study of the literary movements and figures that have characterized the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, an age of individualism, industrialism, and the Great Wars, with a special emphasis on particular themes or problems. Prerequisite: French 212. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • FREN 305: Introduction to French Culture
    Study of the language through an introduction to French culture. The course aims at familiarizing students with the history, current trends, and mentality of the French while enriching their understanding of the language. Prerequisite: French 212. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
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  • FREN 308: Contemporary France
    This course will address current subjects of debate in France and study how France has changed (politically and socially) since its major period of decolonization in the 1950s-60s. Particular attention will be given to France's efforts to integrate immigrants, and specific issues related to French residents of Muslim heritage. Through the reading and discussion of literature and critical essays, as well as viewing current films and internet/satellite news broadcasts, students will gain greater understanding of France's changing identity. Oral and written competence will be enhanced by discussion, debate, presentation, and writing short papers in French. Prerequisite: FREN 212 or equivalent. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: ISLM 308
  • FREN 310: Topics in Linguistics: Phonetics
    This course will cover such topics as phonetics, morphology, syntax, lexicology, and semantics. It introduces these systems in their application to the French language. Prerequisite: French 212 or 220. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • FREN 311: Grammar, Syntax, and Style
    Preparation for graded writing exercises and free composition through study of sentence structure. Complete review of grammar. Translation and study of excerpts of different writing styles from accomplished French encourages development of appropriateness in choice of words and sense of style. Prerequisite: French 212. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • FREN 312: Oral Proficiency
    Oral and written work for students who have already reached an intermediate level of competency in oral and written expression. This course will deal with familiar and formal French. Vocabulary and idioms are taught in a conversational context. Students familiarize themselves with the expressive gestures used by the French and the colloquial expressions that accompany them. Prerequisite: French 212. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • FREN 315: Technical & Literary Translation
    An introduction to the theories and practice of translation from French to English and English to French. Students familiarize themselves with vocabulary used in newspaper and magazine articles on current topics of interest (politics, the economy, etc.), in advertising, in cartoons, and in selected poetry and prose. The arts of interpreting and dubbing or subtitling will also be explored. Prerequisite: French 311 or permission of the instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • FREN 317: Creative Writing & Translation
    This course aims to develop the student's written fluency in French, through the synergy of using two complementary approaches to writing, ie. exercises in translation (primarily French-English) and creative writing exercises in French. The course literature, written by various francophone authors, will include narratives, poems, letters, dramatic scenes, and news articles. Translation of these varied literary genres will hone the student's use of grammar and syntax, as well as understanding of stylistic and literary devices in cultural context. Creative exercises will be linked to literary and stylistic elements of texts studied, and framed in one or more cultural contexts. Original writing will also be inspired by the use of visual media (e.g. film, images), for a variety of short writing assignments to include poetry, prose and dramatic dialogue. The students' oral expression in French will be enhanced by analytic discussion of the readings and visuals, short interpretation exercises (the oral equivalent of translation), presentation and discussion of original creative material. An original text will be chosen for submission to Collage literary magazine. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • FREN 320: French for Int'l Affairs & Business
    This course offers a basic grasp of business and commercial French vocabulary and concepts, while providing an understanding of cultural differences and similarities in the business arena. In addition to practical exercises in business creation, job interviewing and advertising in French, students gain a basic grasp of political and economic issues in contemporary France, giving students the background to discuss French news and current events intelligently. Particularly recommended for students thinking of careers in business, economics, politics or international relations. Prerequisite: FREN212 (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement.)
  • FREN 330: The French-Speaking World
    This course will familiarize students with the history, politics and contemporary culture of various areas of the French-speaking world (such as in Canada, Africa, the Middle East and Western Europe); particular attention will be paid to areas of the French-speaking Islamic World. Topics will vary, and may include discussion of immigration, women's issues, political conflict, changing social and national identity. The course will draw from film, literature, critical materials and contemporary news sources. Prerequisite: French 212 or 220. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: ISLM 330
  • FREN 333: French Culture Through Film
    This course examines contemporary French cultural perceptions through a variety of cinematic examples taken from French films. Cultural analysis will include discussions of French history, literature, politics, geography, and music. In addition, the topic of 'remaking culture' through film is addressed, as the current wave of cinematic remakes invites cross-cultural comparisons between the United States and France. The course will examine major French directors and their cinematic portrayals of the French, as well as documentaries and filmed interviews, and will analyze the 'authenticity' of the portrait they produce of French society. Not open to students who have completed FREN 338: Cinema Francais. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: FRCV 333
  • FREN 334: Exploring French Lit thru Film
    This course will examine French literary works, both historical and contemporary, through a variety of cinematic examples taken from French films. This course will compare the expression of theme, character, and plot structure in written literature (plays and narratives) and in corresponding cinematic adaptations. The course will also address whether the author's literary style is reflected in or displaced by the cinematic style of French 'auteurs' (film directors) studied. The question of translation across genres (literature to film), across language and culture (example of American remakes), and across history (a historical period depicted in a modern cinematic era) will also be discussed. This course is taught in English. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement. )
    Cross-listed as: FRCV 334
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  • FREN 338: Cinema Francais
    This interdisciplinary course provides an overview of French cinematic history, with an emphasis on how French films and movements represent various social and political concerns of their time period. Film will be studied as an art form and cultural text to be interpreted, and films by major directors will illustrate key cinematic concepts and themes. Readings will address the socio-political context, from French film beginnings to the complexity of post-colonial French identity and cultural globalization depicted in contemporary French and Francophone films. This course is discussion-based,with occasional lectures, is taught in French, and will acquaint students with cinematic terms used to interpret the genre. Prerequisite: FREN212 or equivalent. Not open to students who have completed FREN 333: French Culture Through Film in English. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement.)
  • FREN 340: Advanced French Internat'l Affairs
    (Paris, France) An intensive conversation, composition, and vocabulary-building course. Offered in Paris for students participating in our international internship program. After the first four weeks, the course will concentrate on problems of communication students encounter on the job. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • FREN 350: French Theater
    A close reading and discussion of several plays designed to give a clear sense of the development and richness of French theater. Emphasis is placed on literary history, aesthetics, and special questions in dramatic theory. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: French 212. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • FREN 390: Internship
    On-site training in spoken and written French at businesses or other organizations in Paris, France, or in Chicago. Students have been assigned to such organizations as the French government tourist office, The Alliance Francaise, and the Services Culturels Francais in Chicago. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • FREN 410: Creative Composition & Stylistics
    Analysis of style in selected French writers. Stylistic analysis of translations. Intensive work in creative original composition of prose, poetry, and drama. Prerequisite: French 311, 315, or consent of the instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • FREN 460: French Narrative
    Reading and discussion with a view to increasing appreciation of several related novels, works of shorter fiction, or essays. The works are selected for their value as turning points in the understanding of the art of prose fiction and as examples of a particular stage in the development of that art. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: One 300-level course in French. (May be taken by French majors to meet GEC Senior Studies Requirement.)
  • FREN 470: Modern French Poetry
    An analysis of works representative of crucial moments in modern French poetry. The essentials of French versification are stressed, as well as the distinctive character of the various forms within the genre. Not open to students who have taken FREN 370. Prerequisite: One 300-level course in French. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement. May be taken by French majors to meet GEC Senior Studies Requirement).
  • FREN 490: Internship
    On-site training in spoken and written French at businesses or other organizations in Paris, France, or in Chicago. Students have been assigned to such organizations as the French government tourist office, The Alliance Française, and the Services Culturels Français in Chicago. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • FREN 494: Senior Thesis
    The thesis allows students to do in-depth research and to develop an original thesis on a topic in French literature, literatures of the French-speaking world, French civilization, or linguistics. (Offered as required.)

 

German Courses

  • GERM 110: Beginning German I
    Intensive training in the aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing of German, combined with an introduction to the culture of the German-speaking countries. The two-semester sequence provides a basic active command of the patterns and essential vocabulary for conversation and writing, while developing the student's ability to read text passages with accurate comprehension. Prerequisite for German 112: placement recommendation or a grade of C or better in German 110.
  • GERM 112: Beginning German II
    Intensive training in the aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing of German, combined with an introduction to the culture of the German-speaking countries. The two-semester sequence provides a basic active command of the patterns and essential vocabulary for conversation and writing, while developing the student's ability to read text passages with accurate comprehension. Prerequisite for German 112: placement recommendation or a grade of C or better in German 110.
  • GERM 210: Intermediate German
    Practice in reading contemporary fiction and expository prose to develop reading ease and accurate comprehension beyond the elementary level. Classroom discussions and guided compositions, review of grammar topics, lab exercises. Prerequisite: German 112 or the equivalent of one year of college German and placement recommendation.
  • GERM 212: Advanced Intermediate German
    Additional practice in reading contemporary fiction and expository prose. Classroom discussions, further review of grammar topics as needed. Prerequisite: German 210 or the equivalent.
  • GERM 333: Modern German Film
    In our overview of German film from its inception to the opening of the 21st century, students examine and discuss famous as well as off-beat masterpieces of cinema from the perspectives of political and cultural history as well as specifically cinematic aesthetics. The course views and debates films (subtitled in English) by such noted filmmakers as Lang, Fassbinder, Herzog, Schlöndorff, Wenders, Holland, Verhoeven and Fatih Akin. Readings, lectures, and discussions are in English, and the course encourages comparisons with films from other cultures, including popular Hollywood cinema. Prerequisite: a course that develops analytic-interpretive skills, such as, but not limited to: ENGL 210, ENGL 211, ENGL 212, ENGL 216, ENGL 217, COMM 255, or COMM 275; or permission of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • GERM 395: Advanced Topics, Special Studies
    The course will provide students with an opportunity to work on their written and spoken German skills, with a review of German grammar as applied to discussion of current events, literary texts, opera and theater, on-line resources in many fields, and film. Students will also learn new vocabulary in context and present topics of interest to the class in German. The topics in any given semester will be adapted to student interest and needs.
  • GERM 400: Special Studies
    One author, theme, movement, or group of works in German literature studied in depth. (Offered as required. Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)

 

Italian Courses

  • ITAL 120: Parliamo Italiano: Ital Converstn
    Designed for students with minimal (one year) or no previous knowledge of Italian. In this intensive three-week course, we will strive to maximize your oral proficiency using a 'full immersion' approach, including drills of model sentences and word patterns. We will focus on the acquisition of basic verbal communication skills (i.e., oral fluency, correct pronunciation, listening comprehension) and on cultural aspects that will promote understanding and appreciation of Italian culture. (Taught only in the summer).

 

Japanese Courses

  • JAPN 110: Beginning Japanese I
    An introduction to the form of spoken Japanese along with Japanese customs and culture.Most of the fundamental structures are covered in Japanese 110 and 112, together with writing practice in the hiragana and the katakana syllabaries. 112 is a continuation of 110. Lab work is an integral part of the sequence.
    Cross-listed as: ASIA 111
  • JAPN 112: Beginning Japanese II
    An introduction to the form of spoken Japanese along with Japanese customs and culture. Most of the fundamental structures are covered in Japanese 110 and 112, together with writing practice in the hiragana and the katakana syllabaries and some basic kanji. 112 is a continuation of 110. Lab work is an integral part of the sequence. Prerequisite: Japanese 110 or consent of the instructor.
    Cross-listed as: ASIA 113
  • JAPN 210: Intermediate Japanese
    This course will continue the fundamentals of Japanese conversation begun in the first-year series, Japanese 110 and 112, and continue work on reading and writing the language. Extensive oral practice and conversation exercises are stressed. Classes will be supplemented with work in the language laboratory and daily written work. Prerequisite: Japanese 112 or consent of instructor.
    Cross-listed as: ASIA 211
  • JAPN 212: Advanced Intermediate Japanese
    A continuation of the Japanese language fundamentals begun in Japanese 110, 112, and 210. Extensive practice in oral expression and increasingly stronger emphasis on reading and writing, with an extensive use of audio and video materials. Prerequisite: Japanese 210 or consent of the instructor.
    Cross-listed as: ASIA 219

 

Linguistics

  • LING 101: Descriptive Linguistics
    Principles and techniques of descriptive linguistics as seen through different schools of linguistics, from structuralism to modern transformational and stratificational theories. Taught in English.
  • LING 201: Linguistics and Literature
    A consideration of the major linguistic theories and their implications and relations to literary criticism. Special emphasis on applications to literary criticism of transformational grammar, stratificational grammar, and tagmemics. Discussion and critical appraisal of the value of such approaches to literary analysis. Taught in English.

 

Literature in Translation

  • LITR 209: Brazilian Literature
    (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • LITR 210: Don Quijote and Imperial Spain
    This course will study Cervantes's comic masterpiece in English translation. Focus will be on Cervantes's art, on analytical perspectives, and on historical background. Comparisons will be made with reinterpretations of Don Quijote, such as films and drawings. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • LITR 265: Albert Camus: Philos of the Absurd
    (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • LITR 275: Greek Greats
    (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)

 

Spanish Courses

  • SPAN 110: Beginning Spanish I
    Spanish 110 is designed to develop the student's ability to listen to, speak, read, and write basic controlled patterns of the Spanish language. Spanish 112 is a continuation of 110 and culminates in graduated readings, class discussions, and free composition to provide facility with the spoken and written language and insight into its structure and the mores of Spanish-speaking cultures. Lab work is an integral part of the series.
  • SPAN 111: Accelerated Spanish
    Spanish 111 is an intensive course designed to develop the student's ability, speak, read, write and understand basic controlled patterns of the Spanish language. Spanish 111 includes graduated readings, class discussions, and free composition to provide facility with the spoken and written language and insight into its structure and the mores of Spanish-speaking cultures. Intensive Beginning Spanish is designed for highly motivated students.
  • SPAN 112: Beginning Spanish II
    Spanish 110 is designed to develop the student's ability to listen to, speak, read, and write basic controlled patterns of the Spanish language. Spanish 112 is a continuation of 110 and culminates in graduated readings, class discussions, and free composition to provide facility with the spoken and written language and insight into its structure and the mores of Spanish-speaking cultures. Lab work is an integral part of the series. Prerequisite for Spanish 112: placement recommendation or a grade of C or better in Spanish 110.
  • SPAN 201: The Mexican-American Border
    As the only place where the third world and first world touch, the Mexican-American border is unique. This course will focus on the border and how its unique location in the world has created a culture, language, politics, religion and economy that reflect the interdependence between these two neighboring countries. The course will begin with the history of the border from the Gadsden Purchase in 1854 to the passage of NAFTA in 2004 and then examine the impact of free trade on Mexico. The course will explore how people (immigration - both legal and illegal), resources (oil, workers), consumer products (household appliances, food, music, and art), environmental waste (toxic waste, water and air pollution) and technology (outsourcing) cross borders as globalization impacts both Mexicans and Americans. The course involves a three-week stay along the border in May. Pre-requisites: ECON 110 and SPAN 112 or its equivalent. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: IREL 280, BUSN 280, ECON 280,
  • SPAN 202: Chicago: Global/Neighborhood City
    'Chicago: Global City/City of Neighborhoods' recognizes that Chicago is both a global and a 'local' city. On the one hand, the city is involved in manufacturing, trade, and services on a worldwide basis. On the other hand, Chicago is a city of neighborhoods, often based on strong ethnic and racial identities. The course examines the city's dual quality by studying the interconnections between the world economy and the daily life of Chicagoans. A key connection is immigration, which we shall explore from the standpoint of several important communities, including, most prominently, Hispanics/Latinos (given our joint expertise in Spanish and Latin American Studies), as well as African-Americans, Eastern Europeans, and Asians. The course will take both an historical and contemporary approach, as we analyze how the city developed economically, politically, and culturally since the late 19th century, as well as how the city is adjusting today in an age of globalization. No prerequisite. Cross-listed in American Studies, Latin American Studies, Politics, Spanish, and serves as an elective for Urban Studies. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: POLS 239, LNAM 202, AMER 226
  • SPAN 210: Intermediate Spanish
    Practice in reading contemporary fiction, expository prose, drama, and poetry. Classroom discussions, guided and free compositions, review of grammar, lab exercises. Prerequisite: Spanish 112 or placement at the 210 level.
  • SPAN 212: Advanced Intermediate Spanish
    Practice in reading contemporary fiction and expository prose, drama, and poetry to develop reading ease and accurate comprehension beyond the elementary and intermediate levels. Classroom discussion and guided compositions, review of grammar topics, and vocabulary building. Prerequisite: Spanish 210 or placement at the 212 level.
  • SPAN 300: Intro Reading Literature Spanish
    The purpose of this course is to prepare the student for serious reading and analysis of literary texts in Spanish. The course will be an introduction to the concepts of literary criticism and the vocabulary of literary analysis. The course will introduce students to various methodologies, including close reading of texts and sociological and psychological approaches. Texts will be chosen from the three major literary genres: poetry, prose fiction, and drama. It is strongly recommended that students take either Spanish 300 or 305 before going on to literature or culture courses in the 300-400 range. Prerequisite: Spanish 212 or 220. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • SPAN 301: Spanish Conversation & Composition
    A course designed to afford the student who has completed the intermediate sequence intensive practice in conversational and writing skills. Through reading, writing, creative projects, and face-to-face discussion, this course presents students with contemporary language as it appears in a variety of modes of communication, from colloquial slang to formal, academic usage. Prerequisite: SPAN 212, placement at the SPAN 300 level, or permission of the instructor.
  • SPAN 304: Cocina y Cultura y Literatura
    Cocina y cultura y literatura (Cuisine, Culture and Literature) is an immersion type course in which students read fiction and poetry about food. They research and debate ethical and social issues, such as genetic modification of plants, food distribution, hunger, malnutrition, obesity, and anorexia. The students will be responsible for preparing authentic dishes and explaining their cultural significance to the class. Excursions might include visits to a local Hispanic market, a Spanish-speaking soup kitchen, ethnic restaurants, or homes of native Spanish speakers. Prerequisite: Spanish 212. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: LNAM 304
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  • SPAN 305: The Civilization of Spain
    This course is an introduction to the history, art, music, literature, and customs of Spain. Course conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 300 or placement recommendation. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: LNAM 305
  • SPAN 306: Intro Latin American Culture
    This course will be taught in Spanish. It is designed to provide an introductory overview of Latin America's development focusing on its cultural manifestations through time. Films, music, and art will supplement readings for a better understanding of the cultural heterogeneity of Latin America, its past, and its present reality. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: LNAM 306
  • SPAN 308: Spain Today
    The course will focus on popular culture (theatre, music, film, journalism) with a study of the events of the past which led to social and political change in Spain. Spain has been a democracy since 1977 and a member of the European Union since 1986 (the year in which the country voted to join NATO) and has created strong economic, social and cultural ties with Latin America. Through essays and fiction students will examine Spain's move from an isolated dictatorship to a country with a vibrant economy, a leadership role in social justice. With democracy and economic progress Spain faces the problems of a burgeoning illegal immigrant population and the divisive forces of separatism in many of its autonomous regions. Prerequisite: SPAN 212 or 220. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • SPAN 310: Creative Writing
    Intensive work in creative original compositions of prose, poetry, and drama. Analysis of style in selected Hispanic writers. Prerequisite: a Spanish course from the 300 or 400 level or permission of the instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • SPAN 311: Advanced Grammar
    This course reviews grammar, orthography, syntax, and style through graded compositions, free compositions, grammar exercises, and translation. Students will study various types of expository writing to see the grammatical constructions in context and develop a wider vocabulary and a sense of style. Prerequisite: Spanish 212 or placement exam. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • SPAN 312: Oral Proficiency
    Intensive practice and free conversation and composition on a wide range of topics reflecting the needs and interests of the participants. Concentrated study of vocabulary, idioms, and selected grammar patterns and paradigms needed for oral proficiency. Activities include drills, discussions based on readings, debates, dialogues, and sketches. Supporting materials will be drawn from Latin American and Peninsular short stories, films, magazines, and newspapers. Prerequisite: Spanish 212, 220, or placement exam. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • SPAN 313: Spanish for Heritage Speakers
    This course is specifically oriented towards heritage speakers of the language - this is, those for whom Spanish is the predominant spoken language in the home. Students who enter this class will not necessarily have had a formal education in the language, but they must be native speakers of it. The course will introduce, reiterate and fortify the student's grammatical and compositional skills while refining his/her oral expression. The class will be conducted exclusively in Spanish, and in addition to the requisite participation, there will be a considerable number of writing, literary analysis and reinforcement assignments throughout the semester the students will also research the various dialects of Latin American, Peninsular as well as U.S. Spanish.
  • SPAN 314: Spanish Phonetics
    This course introduces the fundamentals of phonetic and phonological theory and describes the Spanish sound system. It also includes extensive oral practice with the aim of improving pronunciation, fluency, and communicative skills. Prerequisite: SPAN 212. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement.)
  • SPAN 315: Translation
    An introduction to the theory and practice of translation. Students will familiarize themselves with the vocabulary of texts dealing with politics, art, literary criticism, and philosophy. Texts will be translated from Spanish to English and from English to Spanish. Please note: This is not a Spanish conversation course. Classes are conducted in Spanish and English. Prerequisite: Spanish 212, 220, or placement recommendation. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement. )
  • SPAN 317: Portuguese for Spanish Speakers
    Utilizing Spanish as the base language, the course will focus on the Portuguese of Brazil, Latin America's largest and most populous country. The course will provide a foundation in the basic skills of reading, writing, understanding, and speaking Portuguese and will include many aspects of Brazilian culture: music, films, magazines, current events, and literature. Prerequisite: a 300-level Spanish course. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: LNAM 317
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  • SPAN 319: Continuing Portuguese
    The course will continue the study of the Portuguese of Brazil, begun in Spanish 317, Spanish for Portuguese Speakers. The course will strengthen the basic skills of reading, writing, understanding, and speaking Portuguese and will include many aspects of Brazilian culture: music, films, magazines, current events, and literature. Prerequisite: Spanish 317 or other immersion experience in Portuguese. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • SPAN 320: Spanish for International Affairs
    An introduction to the specialized vocabulary, styles, and concepts that characterize conversational and written Spanish for international affairs. Attention is focused on familiarizing the student with current issues in business, banking, law, microeconomics, medicine, politics, and human rights. Vocabulary building, conversation practice, listening comprehension, and acquisition of idioms necessary for transcultural contacts are also stressed. Readings are drawn from magazines, newspapers, and journals, with special emphasis on materials from the Internet. Particularly recommended to students who are considering careers in economics, business, politics, and international relations. Prerequisite: Spanish 212, 220, or placement recommendation. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: LNAM 320
  • SPAN 321: Business Spanish
    This course prepares students to understand, follow and discuss common business operations in Spanish. It includes concurrent emphasis on business terminology, conversational practice, readings and discussions of business topics and acquisition of expressions and idioms necessary for doing business in Spain or Latin America. Particularly recommended for students who are thinking of careers in economics, business, politics, and international relations. Prerequisite: SPAN 212. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity requirement.)
  • SPAN 325: U.S. Latino Literature
    This course is taught in Spanish. It is designed to familiarize students with the cultural phenomena produced in the United States by the presence of two major Hispanic groups: Mexican Americans (20.6 million) and Puerto Ricans (3.4 million). The course will examine the historical, political, and cultural development of the Mexican American/Chicano and the Puerto Rican/Boricua Hispanic heritage. The main objective is to provide the students with an overall social and literary understanding and to recognize the cultural contribution made by these two important Hispanic groups. Topics such as neo-colonialism, popular culture, national identity, gender representation in art and literature, religious syncretism, and economic impact on the workforce will be explored. Literary texts by outstanding Chicano and Boricua authors will be included. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: LNAM 325
  • SPAN 330: Survey Peninsular Literature
    A panoramic view of Spanish literature with special emphasis on distinctive features of significant literary movements and periods. Lectures on the history of literature. Readings and discussion on selections from representative literary texts. Prerequisite: Spanish 212, 220, or placement recommendation. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • SPAN 333: Cine e Historia en América Latina
    The course examines the ways that movies view historical events and periods, while at the same time shaping public perception of those events and periods in Latin America. Examples of topics are the Conquest of the Americas, the legacy of Peron, the Castro and post-Castro eras in Cuba, the Catholic Church in Mexico, dictatorship and democracy in Brazil and Chile, and narco-trafficking. The basic format will be discussion with occasional interactive lectures. Readings will include essays on cinema and history. Students will view films mostly in DVD format from several countries. Assignments will include short essays, oral presentations, and a midterm and a final exam. (Counts toward the Spanish major and minor. Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: LNAM 333
  • SPAN 334: Cine Espanol
    An interdisciplinary study of Spanish film, from multiple perspectives: artistic, historical, political, and socio-economic. This course will highlight the artistic achievements of Spanish filmmakers from several periods, including Luis Buñuel, Carlos Saura, and Pedro Almodovar. Readings will include essays on film history, the language of cinema, movie reviews, and interviews with directors. The course will scrutinize the links among cultural phenomena, socio-political events, and the art of filmmaking. Films will be treated as complex aesthetic objects whose language does not merely photograph socio-historical reality but transfigures it. The course will also consider Spain in its broadest Iberian sense and will include films in Catalan, Galician, and Portuguese. Classes will be based mainly on discussion interspersed with occasional lectures. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: LNAM 334
  • SPAN 335: Survey of Latin American Lit
    The development of Latin American letters from the nineteenth-century movements of independence to the contemporary period. Readings will include novels, short stories, poetry, plays, and essays. Prerequisite: Spanish 212, 220, or placement recommendation. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • SPAN 336: Latin American Film
    Taught in English. An interdisciplinary study of Latin American film, from multiple perspectives: artistic, historical, political, and socio-economic. This course will highlight the artistic achievements of Latin American filmmakers from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico. We will use selected readings from original works for films that are based on fiction. A number of films have been Academy Award nominees or winners. Further readings will include a history of Latin American cinema, movie reviews, and interviews with directors. The course will scrutinize the links among cultural phenomena, socio-political events, and the art of filmmaking. Films will be treated as complex aesthetic objects whose language does not merely photograph socio-historical reality but transfigures it. Classes will be based mainly on discussion interspersed with occasional lectures. The course will be conducted in English, but students may choose to read texts and/or write papers in Spanish or Portuguese. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: LNAM 336
  • SPAN 337: The Latin American World
    Taught in English. A study of native peoples of the American Indian civilizations from multiple perspectives: historical, political, sociological, and literary. Course materials include readings and lectures on a wide variety of topics, discussions, films, videos, slides, and music. Students with a knowledge of Spanish and/or Portuguese may work with bilingual materials. May count toward the Spanish major. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
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  • SPAN 338: Cine Latinoamericano
    An interdisciplinary study of Latin American film, from multiple perspectives: artistic, historical, political, and socio-economic. This course will highlight the artistic achievements of Latin American filmmakers from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico. We will use selected readings from original works for films that are based on fiction. A number of films have been Academy Award nominees or winners. Further readings will include a history of Latin American cinema, movie reviews, and interviews with directors. The course will scrutinize the links among cultural phenomena, socio-political events, and the art of filmmaking. Films will be treated as complex aesthetic objects whose language does not merely photograph socio-historical reality but transfigures it. Classes will be based mainly on discussion interspersed with occasional lectures. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: LNAM 338
  • SPAN 339: Brazilian Literature
    Taught in English. A study of selected Brazilian authors from various literary movements and periods. Special consideration will be given to the historical and cultural contexts in which their works were written. Comparisons will be made with the literature of other Latin American countries. Students with a knowledge of Portuguese may work with bilingual materials. An extra hour will be arranged for students interested in practicing their Portuguese. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • SPAN 345: Latino Identities in Chicago
    In this course offering, the student will conduct a cross-disciplinary investigation of the vibrantly complex Chicago Latino community. In doing so, he/she will come to understand both the community's unifying characteristics as well as its internal plurality. Moreover, through various sub-disciplines (immigration, assimilation, race relations, cultural expression, and language), the student will examine ways in which Chicago Latinos distinguish themselves from Latinos at large. In order to authenticate the learning experience, the course will be structured around Chicago (and suburban-Chicago) Latino neighborhoods themselves, including Pilsen, Logan Square, Humboldt Park, Blue Island, Highwood and Waukegan. Each neighborhood will be approached as both representative of a greater Latino culture and the Chicago Latino experience. Ultimately, the student will also learn to distinguish among the cultural traits characteristic to each area of the city. Lastly, various teaching methods will be used to arouse interest in and deepen comprehension of the subject matter. The student will conduct personal interviews of members of different Latino communities (Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican); observe and compare various modes of cultural expression of those communities (literature, music, dance, visual art, cuisine, worship); read literary samples as well as testimonials; and examine the linguistic characteristics unique to each. Above all, the student will enlarge his/her perspective of the prominent socio-cultural role Latinos have held and maintain in Chicago. Prerequisite: Spanish 311 or equivalency. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • SPAN 350: Mod Lat Am Narr in Translation
    During the twentieth century, the narrative fiction of Latin America exploded onto the international literary scene. This course focuses on the precursors of the so-called 'boom' writers (Jorge Luis Borges, Graciliano Ramos) and the boom's major writers (Julio Cortazar, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Juan Rulfo, Carlos Fuentes, Jorge Amado), as well as its more recent figures (Isabel Allende, Clarice Lispector, Laura Esquivel, Manuel Puig), who take us into the twenty-first century. The course includes film adaptations of Latin American fiction. Special consideration is given to the aesthetic and historical contexts of these authors and their works. Students with a knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese may work with bilingual materials if they so choose. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • SPAN 360: Peninsular Narrative
    Reading, analysis, and discussion of selected narrative works of Peninsular Spanish authors; historical and aesthetic considerations of the texts will be stressed. The course is designed to impart to the student a sense of the development of Spanish prose fiction and of recurring and characteristic themes. The student will become acquainted with outstanding authors and works of the Golden Age and the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Prerequisite: Spanish 212, 220, or placement exam. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • SPAN 365: Latin American Narrative
    The study of representative naturalist, neo-realist, and magic-realist writers. The student will read novels and short stories by outstanding writers such as Gallegos, Borges, Fuentes, Garcia Marquez, and Vargas Llosa. Prose works will be considered in a socio-historical context. Prerequisite: Spanish 212, 220, or placement exam. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: LNAM 365
  • SPAN 370: Hispanic Poetry
    The study of masterworks of Latin American and Peninsular poetry. The student will read, analyze, and compare poems from several periods: Medieval, Golden Age, Romantic, Symbolist, Modernist, Surrealist, and Contemporary. Prerequisite: Spanish 212, 220, or placement recommendation. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: LNAM 370
  • SPAN 380: Cine, Literatura y Sociedad Amr Lat
    (Cine, Literatura y Sociedad en America Latina) This course is an interdisciplinary study of Latin American societies, focusing on film and literature from multiple perspectives: artistic, historical, political, and socio-economic. The seminar will highlight the magisterial artistic achievements of Latin American novelists, short story writers, and playwrights and film adaptations of their works. It will scrutinize the links between socio-political events and artistic production. Seminar materials will include films, chapters from novels, short stories, plays, and readings on film, social issues, and politics. The basic format will be discussion with occasional interactive lectures. Assignments will include short essays, oral presentations, and a final exam. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: LNAM 380
  • SPAN 390: Internship
    On-site training in spoken and written Spanish at businesses or other organizations in Santiago, Chile, and in Chicago. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • SPAN 400: Women's Voices in Latin America
    An author, thinker, movement, or group of works studied in depth. All work in Spanish. This course will examine the role of women in Hispanic culture. Important figures such as La Malinche, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, and Eva Peron as well as the fiction, poetry, and films of Rosario Castellanos, Clarice Lispector, Gabriela Mistral, Isabel Allende, Rigoberta Menchu, Maria Luisa Bember, and Alicia Steimberg will be studied. Prerequisite: a 300-level Spanish course. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: LNAM 400, GSWS 400
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  • SPAN 425: Latin American Culture
    A study of Latin American societies from multiple perspectives: historical, political, economic, and artistic. Course materials will include readings and lectures on a wide variety of topics, discussions, films, video, slides, and music. Prerequisite: a 300-level Spanish course. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • SPAN 480: Lit & History in Hispanic World
    The seminar will examine the interrelationships of major literary works and key historical moments in the history of Spain and Latin America. Examples are Don Quijote and the Imperial Age, the stories of García Márquez and 'La Violencia' in Colombia, the fiction of Fuentes and the Mexican Revolution. May be taken by juniors for senior seminar credit; may be taken by sophomores, but not for senior seminar credit. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: LNAM 480
  • SPAN 490: Internship
    On-site training in spoken and written Spanish at businesses or other organizations in Santiago, Chile, and in Chicago. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • SPAN 494: Senior Thesis
    Given for students who wish to graduate with honors. The thesis allows students to do in-depth research and to develop an original thesis on a topic in Hispanic literature or civilization. (Offered as required.)