Course Descriptions

  • ETHC 118: Comparative Religious Ethics
    An introduction to the sources and patterns of moral reasoning within the traditions of Christianity, Islam, Judaism, and Buddhism, by comparing arguments from each tradition on issues of sexuality and the ethics of war and peace. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: RELG 118
  • ETHC 250: Dialogue: Race, Ethnicity, Religion
    In a culturally and socially diverse society, exploring issues of difference, conflict, and community is needed to facilitate understanding and improve relations between social/cultural groups. In this course, students will engage in meaningful discussion of controversial, challenging, and divisive issues in society related to race, ethnicity, and religion. Students will be challenged to increase personal awareness of their own cultural experience, expand knowledge of the historic and social realities of other cultural groups, and take action as agents of positive social change in their communities. This course requires a high level of participation from all students. Note: This course earns .5 credits. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: AFAM 250, RELG 250
  • ETHC 252: Dialogue: Gender Identity
    In a culturally and socially diverse society, exploring issues of difference, conflict, and community is needed to facilitate understanding and improve relations between social/cultural groups. In this course, students will engage in meaningful discussion of controversial, challenging, and divisive issues in society related to gender identity. Students will be challenged to increase personal awareness of their own cultural experience, expand knowledge of the historic and social realities of other cultural groups, and take action as agents of positive social change in their communities. This course requires a high level of participation from all students. Note: This course earns .5 credits. No Prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: GSWS 252
  • ETHC 276: Social Justice and Human Rights
    Examination of the concepts and debates surrounding social justice and human rights, with attention to the arguments between East and West. Applications to current global and domestic issues, such as globalization; poverty and disparities in wealth and opportunity; race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation; political liberties; and genocide.
    Cross-listed as: PHIL 276
  • ETHC 277: Social Justice versus Freedom?
    Examination of the perceived tensions between efforts to promote social justice and guarantees of individual freedom. Theoretical debates will be linked to practical issues, such as promotion of free markets versus government social programs and questions of government's legitimate role on personal issues, such as providing for gay marriage. Efforts to seek common ground will be explored. No prerequisites.
    Cross-listed as: PHIL 277
  • ETHC 290: What Makes a Great Leader?
    How do we recognize a good leader? Is a just or effective leader the same as a great leader? Materials will be drawn from literature, film, and biographies, as well as more theoretical readings from the humanities and social sciences, as we try to answer these very important questions. We will consider specific examples of good and bad leadership (fictional or historical) from a variety of realms, such as politics, social movements, religion, the arts, education, law, science, and public intellectualism. Open to sophomore or junior Honors Fellows, and others with permission of the Honors Fellows Committee.
    Cross-listed as: HSEM 290
  • ETHC 320: Topics in Ethics
    Collaborative research project culminating in a specific ethical theme (announced each time the course is offered.) The course runs for an academic year, earning .5 credit per semester. The course may be repeated for credit. Participation by invitation.
  • ETHC 330: Comparative and International Educ
    ETHC 330: Comparative and International Education: Education as the Practice of Freedom This course examines both the study and practice of comparative and international education. The course is organized with a multidisciplinary perspective with analysis of history, theory, methods, and issues in comparative and international education. A major goal of the course is to interrogate the linkages between education and society. Recurrent themes will be examined to demonstrate how every educational system not only arises from but also shapes its particular socio-cultural context. Students will have the opportunity to deepen and expand their knowledge of educational issues within a global context. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: EDUC 320, SOAN 344
  • ETHC 340: Equity & Social Justice in Educ
    ETHC 340: Equity and Social Justice in Education This course intends to examine notions of 'equity' and 'social justice' in the context of three aspects of education: the historical founding of U.S. schools on oppressive ideals; the ways in which race, gender, and sexual orientation affect and disrupt one's experiences of schooling; and the evolution of the efforts to work against these phenomena within the field of education. The course will explore equity and social justice from a variety of perspectives and through different texts, including analytical journal articles and personal narratives. Readings and discussions will be based heavily on the local world of public education as a microcosm of these issues as they have played out nationally and internationally. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: EDUC 310
  • ETHC 352: Topics in Social Justice
    Examination of a particular issue in social justice, through a research project. Common elements of the course will include examinations of theoretical issues and debates, allowing students to select from a range of possible research topics. Significant time will be devoted to periodic student reports on their projects. Prerequisite: Ethics Center/Philosophy 276 or 277 or permission of instructor.
    Cross-listed as: PHIL 352
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