Requirements

  • Major and Minor in Environmental Studies

    Requirements for the Major:

    A Major in Environmental Studies may be of particular interest to students who are considering careers or graduate programs in diverse subjects such as renewable energy technology, non-profit management, education, ecosystems, energy, and environmental policy. Moreover, it will complement any student’s liberal arts education. 

    A minimum of eleven credits is required. A cumulative average of a C or better must be maintained across all courses used to fulfill the major

    Required (not necessarily in this order):

    1. Introduction to Environmental Studies (ES 110)
    2. Introduction to Chemistry (Chem 115) or Environmental Chemistry (Chem/ES 108)
    3. Evolution, Ecology, and Environment (ES 220) or Ecology and Evolution (Bio 220)
    4. Introduction to Probability and Statistics (Math 150) or Reasoning & Statistical Inference (Bio 150) or Quantitative Methods for Economics and Business (Econ 180) OR ECON/BUSN/FIN 130 Applied Statistics
    5. Environmental Ethics (ES 210) or Religious Perspectives on Environmental Issues (ES 240) or Endangered Species and Endangered Languages (ES 368) or Who Speaks for Animals? (ES 387)
    6. Economics 210 (Microeconomic Theory) or any Politics course at the 200 level or above
    7. Senior Studies Requirement in Environmental Studies. Senior Seminar Courses are offered each year. The Senior Studies requirement can be satisfied by completing either the Senior Seminar or by completing a Senior Thesis. The requirement may also be met by the completion of an Independent Research Project with the prior approval of the Program chair.

    Additional requirements:
     Four elective courses from the lists of elective courses below; at least one must be from each group, and at least two must be 300-level or above. 

     Group 1 (Natural Sciences)

    • Spring Flora of the Great Lakes (ES 203)
    • Summer Flora of the Great Lakes (ES 204)
    • Molecules, Genes, and Cells (Bio 221)
    • Organic Chemistry I (Chem 220)
    • Organic Chemistry II (Chem 221)
    • Lake Forestry (ES 282)
    • Biochemistry (Chem 300)
    • The Science of Human Energy Use (ES 316)
    • Animal Physiology (Bio 340)
    • Developmental Biology (Bio 342)
    • Animal Behavior (Bio 344)
    • Ecology (Bio 370)
    • Earth’s Ancient Ecology (Bio 372)
    • Community Ecology (Bio 373)
    • Conservation Biology (Bio 375)
    • Animal Conservation (ES 376)
    • Tropical Ecology and Conservation (Bio 380)
    • Plant Biology (Bio 384)
    • Evolution (Bio 389)
    • Plant and Animal Interactions (Bio 483)
    • Biological Implications of Climate Change (Bio 487)

     Group 2 (Humanities and Social Sciences)

    • American Environmental Literature (Engl 206)
    • Literature of Place: Chicago (ES 207)
    • Environmental Ethics (ES 210)
    • Environmental Psychology (Psyc 215)
    • Environmental Education (ES 216)
    • Troubled World Geography (ES 217)
    • Philosophy of Science (Phil 225)
    • Religious Perspectives on Environmental Issues (ES 240)
    • American Environmental History (ES 260)
    • American Cities (ES 263)
    • Technology and Human Values (ES 271)
    • Cultural Ecology of Africa (Soan 273)
    • Sustainable Food Systems (ES 287)
    • Biodiversity and Agriculture (ES 289)
    • The Social Ethics of Energy Production and Use (ES 315)
    • Environmental Sociology (Soan 316)
    • Landscape and Representation (Art 320)
    • Sight, Site, Insight (Art 322)
    • Environmental and Natural Resource Economics (ES 340)
    • Chicago: The Food City (ES 344)
    • The American West (Hist 310)
    • Environmental Law (ES 361)
    • The Political Ecology of Things (ES 362)
    • Poetry and Nature (ES 365)
    • Environmental Writing (ES 367)
    • Endangered Species and Endangered Languages (ES 368)
    • Who Speaks for Animals? (ES 387)

    ES 210, 240, 368, and 387 cannot be double-counted for both Requirement 5 and Group 2.

    Students are urged to consult with their advisors to design a program of study that best meets their interests and needs. Students electing to major in environmental studies must choose a member of the Environmental Studies Program Committee as an academic advisor.

    Students are also encouraged to consider a research project, off-campus program, or internship as a way to further their studies. An internship cannot replace an elective course, but is in many cases an excellent complement to the student’s coursework.  

     

    Requirements for the Minor:

    The interdisciplinary minor in Environmental Studies is designed for students who have a strong interest in environmental issues but do not wish to complete a major at the undergraduate level.  This minor may be of particular interest to students who are considering careers or graduate programs in diverse subjects such as renewable energy technology, non-profit management, education, ecosystems, energy and environmental policy. Moreover, it will complement any student’s liberal arts education. This minor may also interest students who wish to teach abroad following graduation, as well as students who wish to engage in cross-curricular research projects.

    Requirements:

    Students must take six courses to complete the minor, one of which must be at the 300 level or above.

    1.  Environmental Studies 110 is required.

    2.  Take the following Natural Science courses:

    One of the following:

    • World Thirst for Energy (Chem 107) or Foundations of Chemistry (Chem 114)
    • Environmental Chemistry (ES 108)
    • Chemistry I (Chem 115)
    • Biochemistry (Chem 300)
    • The Science of Human Energy Use (ES 316)
    • Inorganic Chemistry (Chem 340)

    One of the following:

    • Spring Flora of the Great Lakes (ES 203)
    • Summer Flora of the Great Lakes (ES 204)
    • Evolution, Ecology, and Environment (ES 220) or Ecology and Evolution (Bio 220)
    • Lake Forestry (ES 282)
    • Ecology (Bio 370)
    • Earth’s Ancient Ecology (Bio 372)
    • Community Ecology (Bio 373)
    • Conservation Biology (Bio 375)
    • Animal Conservation (ES 376)
    • Plant and Animal Interactions (Bio 483)
    • Biological Implications of Climate Change (Bio 487)

    3. Take any three of the following Social Science and Humanity courses:

    • Geography and Demography (ES 117)
    • American Environmental Literature (Engl 206)
    • Literature of Place: Chicago (ES 207)
    • Environmental Ethics (ES 210)
    • Environmental Psychology (Psyc 215)
    • Environmental Education (ES 216)
    • Troubled World Geography (ES 217)
    • Philosophy of Science (Phil 225)
    • Religious Perspectives on Environmental Issues (ES 240)
    • American Environmental History (ES 260)
    • American Cities (ES 263)
    • Sustainable Food Systems (ES 287)
    • Biodiversity and Agriculture (ES 289)
    • Technology and Human Values (ES 271)
    • The Social Ethics of Energy Production and Use (ES 315)
    • Environmental Sociology (Soan 316)
    • Landscape and Representation (Art 320)
    • Sight, Site, Insight (Art 322)
    • Environmental and Natural Resource Economics (ES 340)
    • Chicago: The Food City (ES 344)
    • The American West (Hist 310)
    • Environmental Law (ES 361)
    • The Political Ecology of Things (ES 362)
    • Poetry and Nature (ES 365)
    • Environmental Writing (ES 367)
    • Endangered Species and Endangered Languages (ES 368)
    • Who Speaks for Animals? (ES 387)
    • Environmental Studies Capstone Seminar (ES 480)
    • Internship with an approved environmental focus

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