Course Descriptions

  • EDUC 104: Elem Math from Advanced Standpoint
    EDUC 104: Elementary Math from an Advanced Standpoint This course presents an overview, for a sophisticated audience, of several topics from elementary mathematics. The course stresses three themes: mathematics in the liberal arts, mathematics from a historical perspective, and mathematics as a problem-solving activity. Topics to be covered include numeration systems, non-base-10 representations, and elementary number theory including primes and factorizations, rationals as terminating and repeating decimals, irrationals, simple probability experiments, elementary set theory, and mathematical reasoning.
    Cross-listed as: MATH 104
  • EDUC 108: Learning About the Living World
    This course will examine selected topics in life science and earth science such as the human body and its functioning, ecology, ecosystems, weather, the water cycle, and erosion. Designed primarily to provide elementary education majors with the necessary background for teaching in K-8 schools, the course is appropriate for other students interested in strengthening their knowledge and confidence in investigating fundamental concepts and ideas in science. Students will participate in lectures, discussion, student presentations and projects, and laboratory activities. Two 50-minute class hours per week plus one two-hour session for laboratory, demonstrations, or field work. Does not satisfy requirements for the Biology major.
    Cross-listed as: BIOL 108
  • EDUC 109: Learning About the Physical World
    This course will examine selected topics in physical science such as the physical and chemical properties of matter, energy, motion of objects, waves and vibrations, components of the solar system and interactions of objects in the universe. This course is appropriate for students interested in strengthening their knowledge and confidence in investigating fundamental concepts and ideas in science. The course is designed with elementary education majors in mind to provide them with the necessary background for teaching science. Students will participate in lectures, discussions, projects, and laboratory activities. Two 80-minute class hours per week. Not applicable toward the chemistry major or minor.
    Cross-listed as: CHEM 109
  • EDUC 170: Intro to Music Teaching & Learning
    This course introduces students to the skills of teaching music. It explores how human beings acquire musicianship, and covers the foundational elements of music education. Musical elements addressed include: musical development, musical aptitude, listening, movement, rhythm, song teaching, singing, improvisation, composition, and basic teaching techniques associated with these. Students should expect to actively engage in music making, teaching, and critical thinking. Peer teaching and clinical work with elementary students are key components of this course. Prerequisite: MUSC 150 or permission of instructor.
    Cross-listed as: MUSC 170, MUSE 170
  • EDUC 210: Observing the Schooling Process
    An introduction to the teaching-learning process from elementary through high school. Participants observe, analyze, and discuss a variety of educational environments, including classrooms with exceptional students and classrooms in multicultural settings. Major focus on developing competencies in educational library research and writing skills. Not open to First-Year students.
  • EDUC 212: Educational Reform in the U.S.
    This course will explore the meaning of educational reform in the United States, both from a historical and philosophical perspective and in the context of contemporary educational policy. Students will begin the course by studying the progressive educational reform movement of the early twentieth century. They will look at ways in which progressive education initiatives, including the open education movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s, have been challenged by proponents of standardization in schools. Charter schools, magnet schools, school vouchers, and No Child Left Behind also will be examined in order to better understand how the notion of educational reform is one that can be viewed from a wide variety of perspectives and within multiple contexts.
    Cross-listed as: AMER 212, PHIL 214
  • EDUC 215: Instructional CommTheory & Practice
    EDUC 215: Instructional Communication Theory and Practice This course applies socio-linguistic theory to the understanding of learning in academic settings. Based on the premise that knowledge is socially constructed, race, gender, class, and ethnicity are considered social markers that shape the meanings and the values assigned to instructional messages. Students study communication practices in the classroom, apply theories in their analyses, and practice methods and strategies toward becoming more effective communicators through creation and/or delivery of lecture, discussion and cooperative learning simulations. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • EDUC 220: Philosophy of Education
    Survey of significant theories of education, introduction to philosophical analysis of educational concepts, and development of analytical skills applicable to clarifying and resolving pedagogical and policy issues.
    Cross-listed as: PHIL 220
  • EDUC 232: The Teaching of Writing
    Introduces students to theories of writing development with the intention of learning to teach others how to improve their writing skills and strategies.
  • EDUC 239: Hist of Educ in American Society
    (History of Education in American Society) Historical role of education in American society; education as a panacea and as a practical solution; schooling vs. education. Emphasis is on the twentieth century.
    Cross-listed as: HIST 239, AMER 270
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  • EDUC 244: Anthropology of Education
    For the anthropologist, education is the mechanism of socialreproduction, a strategy not limited to schooling but in fact encompassing a person's entire life. For much of the world, the privileging of schooling as a site of education has had real ramifications on the possibility of maintaining cultural forms that go against the pressures of globalization and capitalism. This course opens with a broad consideration of education before focusing on schooling as the preferred institutional form of education under early 21st century globalism. Our questions will include both how schooling operates to maintain existing social structures and power relations and the possibilities - and consequences - of schools as a site of change. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: SOAN 244
  • EDUC 275: Teaching Music in Elementary School
    EDUC 275: Teaching Music in the Elementary School. This course introduces students to the techniques of teaching music to elementary age students. Students will become exposed to developmentally appropriate musical activities for students in kindergarten through eighth grade. Multiple approaches will be presented including Orff, Kodaly, Dalcroze, and Music Learning Theory. Students should expect to actively engage in music making, teaching, and critical thinking. Peer teaching and clinical work with elementary students are key components of this course. Prerequisites: EDUC 170 with a grade of B- or better. Corequisites: No corequisites.
    Cross-listed as: MUSE 275
  • EDUC 303: Reading Methods in Elementary Schl
    EDUC 303: Reading Methods in the Elementary School Places emphasis on theories of language acquisition and on characteristics of language development as they relate to teaching reading and the language arts. Includes research-based practices related to teaching reading comprehension, vocabulary acquisition and development, fluency, and grapho-phonemic skills; includes multiple approaches to reading and language instruction. Students will learn strategies for teaching ELL students and students with exceptional needs and differentiation models for meeting the needs of each student. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 304. Prerequisites: Education 210 and licensure candidate status.
    Cross-listed as: EDUC 403
  • EDUC 304: Elementary Fieldwork & Seminar
    Half-day pre-student teaching fieldwork practicum in the elementary school. Elementary licensure candidates complete 150 hours of supervised classroom observation and participation. Placements are arranged by the Education Department and supervised by faculty within the Education Department on a biweekly basis. Placement in a multicultural setting with a focus on instructional strategies for English language learners (ELLs) is required. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 303. Prerequisites: Education 210 and licensure candidate status. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.) Cross-listed as: EDUC 404.
    Cross-listed as: EDUC 404
  • EDUC 305: Teaching in the Elementary School
    This course emphasizes the importance of developing special skills, competencies, and understanding for teaching elementary school students. It includes philosophy, curriculum, instruction, and methods; design and development of elementary-grade lessons and programs; and observation and participation in elementary school classrooms. Prerequisites: Education 210, Education 313, Education 315, and Psychology 210.
  • EDUC 309: Immigration and Education
    EDUC 309: Immigration and Education: Race, Language, and American Schools While immigration has become a lightning rod for political debate, there is a long history of using education as a tool toward socializing different newcomer groups into American society. This course will examine the ways in which schools have wrestled with the issues of immigration, race, and language as well as the policies and programs that serve to meet immigrant needs in schools, and the social and political implications of immigration. There will be special attention given to Chicago's particular port-of-entry issues. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • EDUC 310: Equity & Social Justice in Educ
    (Equity and Social Justice in Education) This course intends to examine notions of 'equity' and 'social justice' in the context of three aspects of education: the historical founding of U.S. schools on oppressive ideals; the ways in which race, gender, and sexual orientation affect and disrupt one's experiences of schooling; and the evolution of the efforts to work against these phenomena within the field of education. The course will explore equity and social justice from a variety of perspectives and through different texts, including analytical journal articles and personal narratives. Readings and discussions will be based heavily on the local world of public education as a microcosm of these issues as they have played out nationally and internationally. Not open to first-year students. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: ETHC 340
  • EDUC 311: Advanced Fieldwork
    Students who have completed 210 and wish to have additional experience of a different nature in school settings may apply for independent study in schools. Research on some special aspect of schooling is often required. This course is graded only on a Credit/D/Fail basis.
  • EDUC 312: Integrating Arts in Learning Proc
    EDUC 312: Integrating the Arts in the Learning Process This course focuses on the integration of the fine arts in the elementary school curriculum. Students will learn how to meaningfully incorporate the visual arts, drama, music, and dance across the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities in K-8 classrooms to enrich the learning process.
  • EDUC 313: Reading Methods in Content Areas
    Multiple approaches to the teaching of reading, characteristics of language development and its relation to intellectual development in the disciplines, and the application of instructional models to the teaching of writing and reading in the content areas, including teaching exceptional students, especially English Language Learners. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 315. Prerequisites: Education 210 and teacher licensure candidate status.
    Cross-listed as: EDUC 413
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  • EDUC 314: Inclusive Learning Environments
    Emphasis on approaches and methodology that establish an inclusive classroom environment, including methods of instruction and curriculum and instructional and management modifications for students with exceptionalities. Response to Intervention, IEPs, and other school practices that aim to meet the needs of each child are included in this course. Topics include identification of various exceptionalities (e.g., learning disabilities, mental retardation, physical disabilities, etc.) that affect students and the structuring of their learning environments; the role of the special educator in relation to the regular classroom teacher; federal and state legislation that governs special education and the role of the regular classroom teacher; observation and analysis of students with exceptionalities in various learning environments; multicultural and linguistic differences as related to special education; instructional strategy modifications for special populations; and the development of classroom cultures that are sensitive and responsive to differences in gender and sexual orientation. Prerequisite: Psychology 210, Psychology 318, or permission of the department chairperson. Cross-listed as: EDUC 414
    Cross-listed as: EDUC 414
  • EDUC 315: Middle School Fieldwork & Seminar
    Half-day pre-student teaching fieldwork practicum in the middle and junior high school. Secondary licensure candidates complete 150 hours of supervised classroom observation and participation. Placements are arranged by the Education Department and supervised by faculty within the Education Department on a biweekly basis. Placement at a multicultural site with a focus on instructional strategies for English language learners (ELLs) is required. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 313. Prerequisite: Acceptance for licensure candidacy. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.) Cross-listed as: EDUC 415.
    Cross-listed as: EDUC 415
  • EDUC 320: Comparative and International Educ
    (Comparative and International Education: Education as the Practice of Freedom) This course examines both the study and practice of comparative and international education. The course is organized with a multidisciplinary perspective with analysis of history, theory, methods, and issues in comparative and international education. A major goal of the course is to interrogate the linkages between education and society. Recurrent themes will be examined to demonstrate how every educational system not only arises from but also shapes its particular socio-cultural context. Students will have the opportunity to deepen and expand their knowledge of educational issues within a global context. Not open to first year students. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: ETHC 330, SOAN 344
  • EDUC 322: Education in Developing Countries
    (Education and Development in Developing Countries) This course explores the historical background, philosophical foundations and major themes in the education of 'developing countries' within the broader context of global development and social change. The specific goal of this course is to familiarize students with the evolution of and critical issues in formal education in most low income, less industrialized nations. Students will be able to explore contemporary themes in education from a historical and comparative perspective. Additionally, they will expand their conceptual schema for rethinking educational issues within and beyond their own societies. Geographically, this course covers countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America, but runs comparisons with countries in Europe and North America when theoretically relevant. Reading materials build on development studies and several disciplines in the social sciences and humanities such as history, philosophy, anthropology, sociology and education. Not open to first year students. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: IREL 322, SOAN 343
  • EDUC 363: Children's & Young Adult Literature
    EDUC 363: Creative Writing: Children's and Young Adult Literature This course is designed to give students the tools they need to write a novel for children ages 7 to 16. We will gain an understanding of the art and craft of the children's novel by reading and analyzing classic works, and by attempting our own novels and receiving feedback on our efforts. Classes will include writing exercises, peer review, feedback on students' work by the instructor, and discussions of techniques used by established authors to create successful novels. The course can accommodate those who have already begun work on a novel, as well as those who have not. (Does not meet GEC Social Sciences requirement. Meets GEC Humanities requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: ENGL 363
  • EDUC 403: Reading in the Elementary School
    Reading Methods in the Elementary School: Places emphasis on theories of language acquisition and on characteristics of language development as they relate to teaching reading and the language arts. Includes research-based practices related to teaching reading comprehension, vocabulary acquisition and development, fluency, and grapho-phonemic skills; includes multiple approaches to reading and language instruction. Students will learn strategies for teaching ELL students and students with exceptional needs and differentiation models for meeting the needs of each student. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 404. Prerequisites: Education 210 and MAT licensure candidate status.
    Cross-listed as: EDUC 303
  • EDUC 404: Elementary Fieldwork & Seminar
    Half-day pre-student teaching fieldwork practicum in the elementary school. Elementary licensure candidates complete 150 hours of supervised classroom observation and participation. Placements are arranged by the Education Department and supervised by faculty within the Education Department on a biweekly basis. Placement in a multicultural setting with a focus on instructional strategies for English language learners (ELLs) is required. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 403. Prerequisites: Education 210 and licensure candidate status. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.) Cross-listed as: EDUC 304.
    Cross-listed as: EDUC 304
  • EDUC 406: Teaching Adolescent Students
    This course emphasizes the importance of developing special skills, competencies, and understanding for teaching middle school students. It includes middle-grade philosophy, curriculum, instruction, and methods; design and development of middle-grade lessons and programs; assessment coordination and referral of students to health and social services; and observation and participation in middle school classrooms. Prerequisites: Education 303 and 304.
    Cross-listed as: EDUC 506
  • EDUC 411: Advanced Fieldwork
    Students who have completed 210 and wish to have additional experience of a different nature in school settings may apply for independent study in schools. Research on some special aspect of schooling is often required. This course is graded only on a Credit/D/Fail basis.
  • EDUC 413: Reading Methods in Content Areas
    Multiple approaches to the teaching of reading, characteristics of language development and its relation to intellectual development in the disciplines, and the application of instructional models to the teaching of writing and reading in the content areas, including teaching exceptional students, especially the English Language Learners. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 415. Prerequisites: Education 210 and MAT licensure candidate status.
    Cross-listed as: EDUC 313
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  • EDUC 414: Inclusive Learning Environments
    Emphasis on approaches and methodology that establish an inclusive classroom environment, including methods of instruction and curriculum and instructional and management modifications for students with exceptionalities. Response to Intervention, IEPs, and other school practices that aim to meet the needs of each child are included in this course. Topics include identification of various exceptionalities (e.g., learning disabilities, mental retardation, physical disabilities, etc.) that affect students and the structuring of their learning environments; the role of the special educator in relation to the regular classroom teacher; federal and state legislation that governs special education and the role of the regular classroom teacher; observation and analysis of students with exceptionalities in various learning environments; multicultural and linguistic differences as related to special education; instructional strategy modifications for special populations; and the development of classroom cultures that are sensitive and responsive to differences in gender and sexual orientation. Prerequisite: Psychology 210, Psychology 318, or permission of the department chairperson. Cross-listed as: EDUC 314
    Cross-listed as: EDUC 314
  • EDUC 415: Middle School Fieldwork & Seminar
    Half-day pre-student teaching fieldwork practicum in the middle and junior high school. Secondary licensure candidates complete 150 hours of supervised classroom observation and participation. Placements are arranged by the Education Department and supervised by faculty within the Education Department on a biweekly basis. Placement at a multicultural site with a focus on instructional strategies for English language learners (ELLs) is required. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 413. Prerequisite: Acceptance for licensure candidacy. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.) Cross-listed as: EDUC 315.
    Cross-listed as: EDUC 315
  • EDUC 416: Elem & Mid Schl-Literacy & Soc Stud
    EDUC 416: Curriculum and Instruction in the Elementary and Middle School: Content-Area Literacy and Social Studies Seminar focusing on research-based content area reading practices and curriculum and instructional planning. Includes theoretical and philosophical frameworks for curriculum design, instructional approaches, and assessment, including data analysis and its use in instructional planning. Also stresses principles of establishing various learning environments for student engagement in learning and curriculum integration and how curricula are organized for children at differing developmental levels with various backgrounds in school literacy environments. Prerequisite: Education 303/304 with a grade of B- or better; co-requisite: Education 417.
    Cross-listed as: EDUC 516
  • EDUC 417: Elem & Mid Schl-Math & Science
    EDUC 417: Curriculum and Instruction in the Elementary and Middle School: Math and Science Seminar focusing on curriculum and instructional planning in math and science and how math and science curricula are organized for children at differing developmental levels and with various backgrounds. Includes theoretical and philosophical frameworks for curriculum design, instructional approaches, and assessment in math and science. Students will practice creating Teacher Work Samples that use data to plan instruction and help focus teachers on the impact of instruction on student learning Also stresses principles of and practice for using various technological teaching tools. This course has fieldwork experiences in science, math, and technology instruction. Prerequisite: Education 303/304 with a grade of B- or better; co-requisite Education 416.
    Cross-listed as: EDUC 517
  • EDUC 418: Elem Student Teaching & Seminar
    EDUC 418: Elementary Student Teaching and Seminar Full-day supervised teaching for 14 weeks in a cooperating school and a weekly seminar. This course is graded only on a Credit/D/Fail basis. Prerequisite: Education 416/417 with a grade of B- or better.
    Cross-listed as: EDUC 518
  • EDUC 419: Secondary Curriculm & Instruct Dsgn
    EDUC 419: Secondary Curriculum and Instructional Design This senior seminar focuses on the practical use of educational theory in the secondary classroom by investigating and applying knowledge of research-based curriculum design practices, learning theory, lesson and course planning, assessment and use of data to improve instruction, integration of classroom technology, and classroom management. Students will conduct analyses of teaching theory and practice, create and analyze lesson design using a Teacher Work Sample model, and analyze unit structures and resources through a series of authentic tasks. Prerequisite: Education 313/315 with a grade of B- or better; co-requisite Education 420.
    Cross-listed as: EDUC 519
  • EDUC 420: Discipline-Specific Secondary Curr
    EDUC 420: Discipline-Specific Secondary Curriculum and Instructional Design This senior seminar focuses on approaches and methodology in the teaching of the content area of licensure. Students will explore research-based instructional theories central to their teaching discipline, subject matter-specific ways of constructing knowledge, and specific methods of inquiry and assessment for learning in a particular subject field. Students will conduct research on an area of study relevant to their discipline, present content-area demonstration lessons, and construct a culminating unit demonstrating best practices for teaching in their disciplines. In addition, each student will be assigned a clinical placement in a high school for observation hours and consultation with a field-based faculty mentor in connection with the class. Prerequisite: Education 313/315 with a grade of B- or better; co-requisite Education 419.
  • EDUC 421: Secondary Stud Teaching & Seminar
    EDUC 421: Secondary Student Teaching and Seminar Full-day supervised teaching for 14 weeks in a cooperating school and a weekly seminar. This course is graded on a Credit/D/Fail basis. Prerequisites: Education 419 and Education 420 with a grade of B- or better.
    Cross-listed as: EDUC 521
  • EDUC 422: Discipline-Specific K-12 Curriculum
    (Discipline-Specific K-12 Curriculum and Instructional Design) This senior seminar focuses on approaches and methodology in the teaching of the content area of licensure. Students will explore research-based instructional theories central to their teaching discipline, subject matter-specific ways of constructing knowledge, and specific methods of inquiry and assessment for learning in a particular subject field. Students will conduct research on an area of study relevant to their discipline, present content-area demonstration lessons, and construct a culminating unit demonstrating best practices for teaching in their disciplines. In addition, each student will be assigned two clinical placements: one in a high school for observation hours and consultation with a field-based faculty mentor; and one in an elementary school for a practicum teaching experience with a mentor teacher and a college supervisor. Prerequisite: entrance into teacher licensure program; EDUC 313 and 315 with grades of B- or better; co-requisite EDUC 419.
    Cross-listed as: EDUC 522
  • EDUC 450: Special Studies in Education
    Advanced research in the process of schooling and teaching. May be an independent project or an advanced internship. Available only to juniors and seniors. Can be taken for one or two credits depending on the scope of the project and with approval of Department Chair.
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  • EDUC 501: Introduction to Teacher Research
    This course provides the MAT candidate with an introduction to educational research. Topics include the context of teacher research, an introduction to multiple varieties of teacher research, with an emphasis on action research, as well as grounding in quantitative and qualitative research methods. A case study of action research will be completed. Prerequisite: Second year MAT licensure candidate status.
  • EDUC 502: Teacher Action Research Project
    This course provides the MAT candidate with an opportunity to conduct a teacher action research project within the context of the student teaching placement. Supervision will be provided by Education Department Faculty members as well as the cooperating teaching in the elementary or secondary placement. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 518 or 521. Prerequisite: Education 516/517 sequence or 519/520 sequence or 522 sequence with a grade of B- or better and second year MAT licensure candidate status.
  • EDUC 506: Teaching Adolescent Students
    This course emphasizes the importance of developing special skills, competencies, and understanding for teaching middle school students. It includes middle-grade philosophy, curriculum, instruction, and methods; design and development of middle-grade lessons and programs; assessment coordination and referral of students to health and social services; and observation and participation in middle school classrooms. Prerequisites: Education 403/404 with a grade of B- or better and second year MAT licensure candidate status.
    Cross-listed as: EDUC 406
  • EDUC 516: Elem & Mid Schl-Literacy & Soc Stud
    (Curriculum and Instruction in the Elementary and Middle School: Content-Area Literacy and Social Studies) This graduate seminar focuses on research-based content area reading practices and curriculum and instructional planning. Includes theoretical and philosophical frameworks for curriculum design, instructional approaches, and assessment, including data analysis and its use in instructional planning. Also stresses principles of establishing various learning environments for student engagement in learning and curriculum integration and how curricula are organized for children at differing developmental levels with various backgrounds in school literacy environments. Additional work aligned with the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards criteria will be required. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 517. Prerequisite: Education 403 and 404 with a grade of B- or better and second year MAT licensure candidate status.
    Cross-listed as: EDUC 416
  • EDUC 517: Elem & Mid Schl-Math & Science
    (Curriculum and Instruction in the Elementary and Middle School: Math and Science) This graduate seminar focuses on curriculum and instructional planning in math and science and how math and science curricula are organized for children at differing developmental levels and with various backgrounds. Includes theoretical and philosophical frameworks for curriculum design, instructional approaches, and assessment in math and science. Students will practice creating Teacher Work Samples that use data to plan instruction and help focus teachers on the impact of instruction on student learning. Also stresses principles of and practice for using various technological teaching tools. This course has fieldwork experiences in science, math, and technology instruction. Additional work aligned with the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards criteria will be required. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 516. Prerequisite: Education 403 and 404 with a grade of B- or better and second year MAT licensure candidate status.
    Cross-listed as: EDUC 417
  • EDUC 518: Elementary Student Teaching & Semnr
    (Elementary Student Teaching and Seminar) Full-day supervised teaching for 14 weeks in a cooperating school and a weekly seminar. This course is graded only on a SCR/Fail basis. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 502. Prerequisite: Education 516 and 517 with a grade of B- or better and second year MAT licensure candidate status.
    Cross-listed as: EDUC 418
  • EDUC 519: Secondary Curriculm & Instruct Dsgn
    (Secondary Curriculum and Instructional Design) This graduate seminar focuses on the practical use of educational theory in the secondary classroom by investigating and applying knowledge of research-based curriculum design practices, learning theory, lesson and course planning, assessment and use of data to improve instruction, integration of classroom technology, and classroom management. Students will conduct analyses of teaching theory and practice, create and analyze lesson design using a Teacher Work Sample model, and analyze unit structures and resources through a series of authentic tasks. Additional work aligned with the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards criteria will be required. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 520 or 522. Prerequisite: Education 413 and 415 with a grade of B- or better and second year MAT licensure candidate status.
    Cross-listed as: EDUC 419
  • EDUC 520: Discipline-Specific Secondary Curr
    (Discipline-Specific Secondary Curriculum and Instructional Design) This graduate seminar focuses on approaches and methodology in the teaching of the content area of licensure. Students will explore research-based instructional theories central to their teaching discipline, subject matter-specific ways of constructing knowledge, and specific methods of inquiry and assessment for learning in a particular subject field. Students will conduct research on an area of study relevant to their discipline, present content-area demonstration lessons, and construct a culminating unit demonstrating best practices for teaching in their disciplines. In addition, each student will be assigned a clinical placement in a high school for observation hours and consultation with a field-based faculty mentor in connection with the class. Additional work aligned with the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards criteria will be required. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 519. Prerequisite: Education 413 and 415 with a grade of B- or better and second year MAT licensure candidate status.
  • EDUC 521: Secondary Student Teaching & Seminr
    Full-day supervised teaching for 14 weeks in a cooperating school and a weekly seminar. This course is graded on a SCR/Fail basis. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 502. Prerequisite: Education 519/520 or 522 with a grade of B- or better and second year MAT licensure candidate status.
    Cross-listed as: EDUC 421
  • EDUC 522: Discipline-Specific K-12 Curriculum
    (Discipline-Specific K-12 Curriculum and Instructional Design) This graduate seminar focuses on approaches and methodology in the teaching of the content area of licensure. Students will explore research-based instructional theories central to their teaching discipline, subject matter-specific ways of constructing knowledge, and specific methods of inquiry and assessment for learning in a particular subject field. Students will conduct research on an area of study relevant to their discipline, present content-area demonstration lessons, and construct a culminating unit demonstrating best practices for teaching in their disciplines. In addition, each student will be assigned two clinical placements: one in a high school for observation hours and consultation with a field-based faculty mentor; and one in an elementary school for a practicum teaching experience with a mentor teacher and a college supervisor. Additional work aligned with the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards criteria will be required. This course must be taken concurrently with Education 519. Prerequisite: Education 413 and 415 with a grade of B- or better and second year MAT licensure candidate status.
    Cross-listed as: EDUC 422
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