Course Descriptions

A local ethnic group performs in Lijiang, Yunnan Province, China.A local ethnic group performs in Lijiang, Yunnan Province, China.

  • ASIA 107: Developing World Thirst for Energy
    This course will introduce the concepts behind the ever-increasing global demand for energy. Through laboratory experiments, field trips, and discussions of current events, students will develop an understanding of the many issues related to meeting the world's energy needs. In particular, the dramatic economic growth in China and India raise additional issues about sustainable energy generation in the face of global imbalances in the carbon cycle.
    Cross-listed as: CHEM 107
  • ASIA 110: Beginning Chinese I
    This course is an introduction to the forms of spoken Chinese. Most of the fundamental structures are covered in Chinese 110 and 112, together with writing practice. 112 is a continuation of 110. Lab work is an integral part of the sequence.
    Cross-listed as: CHIN 110
  • ASIA 111: Beginning Japanese I
    An introduction to the form of spoken Japanese along with Japanese customs and culture.Most of the fundamental structures are covered in Japanese 110 and 112, together with writing practice in the hiragana and the katakana syllabaries. 112 is a continuation of 110. Lab work is an integral part of the sequence.
    Cross-listed as: JAPN 110
  • ASIA 112: Beginning Chinese II
    This course is an introduction to the forms of spoken Chinese. Most of the fundamental structures are covered in Chinese 110 and 112, together with writing practice. 112 is a continuation of 110. Lab work is an integral part of the sequence.
    Cross-listed as: CHIN 112
  • ASIA 113: Beginning Japanese II
    An introduction to the form of spoken Japanese along with Japanese customs and culture. Most of the fundamental structures are covered in Japanese 110 and 112, together with writing practice in the hiragana and the katakana syllabaries and some basic kanji. 112 is a continuation of 110. Lab work is an integral part of the sequence. Prerequisite: Japanese 110 or consent of the instructor.
    Cross-listed as: JAPN 112
  • ASIA 200: Origins of East Asia
    Introduction to the great civilizations of China and Japan, with emphasis on development of their fundamental characteristics. Highlights both shared traditions and significant differences between the two countries. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: HIST 212
  • ASIA 201: Modern East Asia
    Study of China, Japan, and Korea as each moved toward modern nationhood over the last 200 years. Attention to the difficulties each has confronted, including Japan's vision of empire shattered by World War II, China's civil war, and Korea's transformation through foreign interventions. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: HIST 213
  • ASIA 202: History of India
    A survey of civilization in south Asia over five millennia, focusing on core themes such as society, culture, political economy, administrative institutions, religious practices, and the impact of foreign invasions and cultures. Utilizing archaeological evidence as well as written sources, we study the peoples and civilizations of the subcontinent (including the Harappan civilization, the Aryans, technology and society from the Iron Age to the era of Buddha, the Mauryas and other north Indian polities, and the Gupta era and the kingdoms of south India). Then we discuss the Indo-Islamic heritage and the impact of Turkish rule, ending with the Mughal Empire. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: HIST 216, ISLM 202
  • ASIA 203: Modern South Asia
    Survey of South Asia - today the countries of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh - from 1750 to the present, a period that includes more than a century and a half of British colonial rule. The course is designed to offer a critical study of the issues that shaped the region: the transition to colonialism in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries and its impact on the Indian economy, culminating in revolt against the British in 1857; the rise of Indian nationalist movements, the anti-colonial struggle, and events leading to independence and partition of the subcontinent in 1947 and the aftermath; political developments in the post-colonial states of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. Theories about caste, class, gender, and the role of religion are explored in detail to illuminate the post-colonial problems of the subcontinent. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: HIST 217, ISLM 203
  • ASIA 205: Japanese Art and Culture
    The course focuses on the history of Japanese art from neolithic to modern times, with emphasis on the art forms of the major periods and their relationship to social, political, and religious developments. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: ARTH 205
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  • ASIA 206: Chinese Art
    This course examines the history of Chinese art from the Bronze Age to the present with emphasis on the major art forms and their relationship to contemporary social, political, and religious development. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: ART 206
  • ASIA 210: Intermediate Chinese
    This course will continue the fundamentals of Chinese conversation begun in the first-year series, Chinese 110 and 112, and continue work on reading and writing the language. Extensive oral practice and conversation exercises are stressed. Classes will be supplemented with laboratory exercises and written work.
    Cross-listed as: CHIN 210
  • ASIA 211: Intermediate Japanese
    This course will continue the fundamentals of Japanese conversation begun in the first-year series, Japanese 110 and 112, and continue work on reading and writing the language. Extensive oral practice and conversation exercises are stressed. Classes will be supplemented with work in the language laboratory and daily written work. Prerequisite: Japanese 112 or consent of instructor.
    Cross-listed as: JAPN 210
  • ASIA 212: Advanced Intermediate Chinese
    This is the second course in intermediate Chinese. It focuses on further developments of the four language skills to support sustained oral and written performance at the intermediate level to prepare students for third year Chinese study. The focus will be on oral expression with expanding vocabulary, enhancing understanding of grammar, and introducing more complex structures and texts.
    Cross-listed as: CHIN 212
  • ASIA 213: Global Islam
    This course explores the origin and development of the Islamic religious tradition, along with varying interpretations of Islamic law and prominent issues facing contemporary Muslims around the world. Participants in the course read classical and contemporary literature as windows into Muslim life in different cultures and historical periods, and view Islamic art and architecture as visual texts. To learn about the rich diversity within Islam, students can work with texts, rituals, poetry, music, and film from a range of cultures within the Muslim world, from the Middle East, Africa, and Asia to Europe and North America. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: RELG 213, ISLM 213
  • ASIA 214: Hinduism
    This course examines the teachings of the Hindu religious tradition as presented in the earliest writings of the tradition, as well as in dramas, epic narratives, and contemporary religious practice. In the course of the semester, we will visit Hindu Temples in the Chicago area as we explore the historical, social, and cultural context of Indian religious themes as they continue to be practiced in the 21st century. Texts range from philosophical musings about the nature of the universe to the story of a king who loses his wife to a 10-headed demon. (Meets Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: RELG 214
  • ASIA 215: Buddhism
    An introduction to the origins of Buddhism in India as well as to the major cultural and historical influences on the spread of Buddhism throughout Asia, particularly in India, Sri Lanka, Myanmar, Thailand, Tibet, China, and Japan. The course will examine various forms of Buddhist practice including devotion, ethics, sangha membership, meditation, rituals, and festivals. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: RELG 215
  • ASIA 216: Chinese Religions
    Focusing primarily on the teachings of the Confucian (and neo-Confucian), Daoist, and early Chinese Buddhist traditions, we will explore the concepts and practices of these communities within their historical, cultural, and social contexts. Reading narrative, poetic, and classical texts in translation that present such ideas as the ethics of human-heartedness, the relativity of all things, and the importance of self-sacrifice, we will discuss what teachings these masterful texts offer 21st century questioners. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: RELG 216
  • ASIA 217: Religions of Asia
    (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • ASIA 218: Asian Politics
    (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
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  • ASIA 219: Advanced Intermediate Japanese
    A continuation of the Japanese language fundamentals begun in Japanese 110, 112, and 210. Extensive practice in oral expression and increasingly stronger emphasis on reading and writing, with an extensive use of audio and video materials. Prerequisite: Japanese 210 or consent of the instructor.
    Cross-listed as: JAPN 212
  • ASIA 220: Islam and Pop Culture
    In recent decades the global Islamic revival has produced a new generation of Muslim film stars and fashion models, Sufi self-help gurus, Muslim comic book heroes, romance novel writers, calligraphy artists, and even Barbie dolls. This course explores the pop sensations, market niches, and even celebrity scandals of 'Popular Islam' within the broader context of religious identity, experience, and authority in Islamic traditions. Balancing textual depth with geographic breadth, the course includes several case studies: Egypt, Indonesia, Iran, Mali, Turkey, and North America. Students will learn about how religious trends are created -- and debated -- on pop culture's public stage. We will reflect critically on both primary materials and inter-disciplinary scholarly writings about the relationships between pop culture, religious identities, devotional practices, and political projects. No pre-requisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: RELG 220, ISLM 220
  • ASIA 224: Literature of the Vietnam War
    This course examines the Vietnam War as refracted through various literary genres. The readings for the course include Graham Greene's The Quiet American, Tim O'Brien's The Things They Carried, and Truong Nhu Tang's Vietcong Memoir. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: ENGL 224, AMER 224
  • ASIA 230: East Asian Lit in Translation
    (East Asian Literature in Translation taught in English). This course is an introduction to traditional East Asian literature with the primary focus on China, Japan and Korea. It will concentrate on several themes, topics, authors and representative works of traditional Chinese, Japanese and Korean literature; emphasis on critical reading. This course will provide the students an opportunity to enjoy the most well known poems, novels and short stories produced by the prominent authors of the genres. Prerequisites: No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: CHIN 230
  • ASIA 247: Anthropology of Pacific Islands
    This course is intended to provide an ethnographic and historical overview of classic and contemporary directions of anthropological research in the eastern Pacific. The primary course goal is to develop n ethnographic and historical appreciation for Polynesian culture at the three points of the Polynesian triangle. We will work toward this goal by a focused examination of the cultures of particular island groups in the eastern Pacific. En route, students will be introduced to issues as diverse as Polynesian voyaging and myths, and the ways that traditional cultural beliefs and practices and the social institutions in which they coalesce such as chieftanship, kinship and adoption are subject to historical change. We will pay particular attention to the distinct expressions of social relationships and cultural forms that developed under varying conditions across the region. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: SOAN 247
  • ASIA 251: Intro to Chinese Literature in Engl
    (Introduction to Chinese Literature in English) This course will introduce students to Chinese literature through representative works of philosophy, poetry, folklore and modern short stories. The goal of this course is twofold: to grant students glimpses into the rich repertoire of Chinese literature and hence insights into the fundamental humanistic traditions of China; and to develop a set of skills of literary analysis. No knowledge of Chinese language or prior coursework on Chinese culture is required. Taught in English. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: CHIN 251
  • ASIA 252: Chinese Literature and Civilization
    (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • ASIA 253: Philosophy of Self: East and West
    The course will examine how great thinkers from East and West, ancient and modern times, have tackled the relation between reason, passion, and desire. We will study Plato's tripartite model of the soul, the Stoic monism, especially Chrysippus' theory of desire, and various Eastern concepts such as self-overcoming, unselfing, and self-forgetting. We will also include some basic readings from the scientific discussions on mirror neurons and Antonio Damasio’s writings on self and emotion. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: PHIL 253
  • ASIA 260: Intro to Chinese Culture in English
    This course will explore elements of Contemporary Chinese culture and themes related to living, studying or working in China, as seen in films, videos, internet sources, and selected fiction and non-fiction texts. Topics covered include China's diverse geography, peoples and cuisine, doing business in China, the societal role of Chinese medicine, festivals and weddings, interpreting folk and contemporary art forms, current trends and themes in popular culture. This course will be taught in English. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: CHIN 260
  • ASIA 273: Global Engagement Contemp China I
    Focused on contemporary China, this course provides an introduction to Chinese culture, history, politics, and society. Using lecture, readings, discussions, and field trips, the class creates an opportunity for students to engage contemporary issues facing Chinese culture and society. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
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  • ASIA 274: 21st Century China
    An interdisciplinary class based on individual research and experiential learning in China, this course consists of 8 on-campus orientation sessions, individual pre-travel research, and participation in Asia-related events during the spring semester. The primary focus of the class is a 21-day May study tour in China, followed by post-travel research projects due in June. Pre-requisites: one Asian Studies class or 1 year of an Asian language; and approval for off-campus study. Open to sophomores and juniors. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.) Applicants for early decision (spring) must submit all Stage I and II forms to the Office of Off-Campus Programs, and completed applications and references for the May China Program to the Dean of Faculty Office by May 1. If openings remain unfilled, a second round of applications will be accepted in the fall. Fall Stage I and II forms must be submitted to the Office of Off-Campus Programs, and May China Program applications to the Dean of Faculty Office by October 15.
  • ASIA 275: Desire and Discipline: Asian Morals
    This course offers a focused historical narrative of the development of Asian moral thinking. It shows, at its early phase, how a particular moral philosopher's thinking (such as Mencius and Xun-zi) is largely determined by his thinking on human nature. However, in later periods, particularly after the importation of Buddhism, the debates on human nature are replaced by an intense cognitive and metaphysical interest in the human mind. Moral cultivation begins to focus less on following moral rules but more on cultivating the mind. The effect of this nature-mind shift on Asian moral thinking is both historically profound and theoretically surprising. Readings: Confucius, Mencius, Xun-zi, Lao zi, Zhuang zi, Zhang Zai, Chen Brothers, Zhu Xi and D. T. Suzuki. (Meets the GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: PHIL 275
  • ASIA 276: Female Religious Images in Asia
    Goddess figures in India, China, and Japan are studied in this class along with the roles of human women in particular Asian religious traditions. This class explores the experiences of Buddhist nuns, Hindu and Muslim female saints, traditional healers, and shamans. Readings are drawn from religious texts, myths, and short stories from specific Asian cultures. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: RELG 276, GSWS 276
  • ASIA 279: Hinduism and Narrative
    (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • ASIA 280: Architecture in East Asia
    This course explores a diverse body of architecture in China and Japan from ancient to contemporary times. We will investigate the major architectural types in traditional East Asia—including cities, temples, palaces, gardens, and houses—as well as individual monuments like Japan's Himeji Castle and the 'Bird's Nest' Olympic stadium in Beijing. In addition to examining the architectural history of these sites, we will discuss thematic issues related to design, space, landscape, ritual, memory, and modernity. No prerequisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: ARTH 280
  • ASIA 282: Visions of Family
    (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • ASIA 283: Modern China
    Relying as much as possible on Chinese texts (in translation), this course will examine such topics as China's response to Western imperialism in the nineteenth century; the 1911 Revolution; the May Fourth Movement; the birth of the People's Republic of China; the Cultural Revolution; and the Democracy Movement of the 1980s. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: HIST 260
  • ASIA 284: World War II in Asia
    Through lecture and discussion, we will look at the origins of the war; the invasion of China and the Rape of Nanking; battle at sea and on the mainland of Asia; surrender; lives of individual soldiers, diplomats, refugees, POWs, 'comfort women,' collaborators, and guerrillas; and continuing controversies over memory, apology, reparation, and national identity. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement).
    Cross-listed as: HIST 264
  • ASIA 285: Topics in Japanese Thought
    The course focuses on the Japanese understanding of nature, life, and history. We will focus on the ideas of fragility, impermanence, and beauty. Students will learn the central ideas of Zen Buddhism. Topics to be covered may include artistic representations in Noh plays, Tea ceremonies, and the Samurai culture. Prerequisite: any course in Asian thought or permission of the instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement).
    Cross-listed as: PHIL 285
  • ASIA 286: Modern Japan
    From the founding of the last shogunate, the Tokugawa, in 1603 to its present status as an economic giant among the nations of the Pacific. Attention to the achievements as well as the undeniable sufferings and costs incurred during Japan's drive toward great power. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: HIST 262
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  • ASIA 305: Comp Philosophy: East & West
    Comparative investigation of Eastern and Western philosophical sources; elucidation and critical examination of fundamental presuppositions, unique conceptual formulations, and alternative approaches to general philosophical issues. Prerequisite: One Western philosophy course and one Asian area course, or consent of the instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: PHIL 305
  • ASIA 306: Buddhist Arts of Asia
    In the early centuries CE, Buddhism spread eastward from its origins in India to China, Korea, and Japan. It brought with it a rich religious tradition that altered forever the visual arts of these regions. Students in this course will explore the painting, sculpture, and monuments of the East Asian Buddhist world from ancient times to the twentieth century, paying particular attention to issues of patronage, ritual, iconography, symbolism, and style in order to better understand the complex relationships between religion and art. No pre-requisites. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: ARTH 306
  • ASIA 307: Topics in East Asian History
    (Topics in East Asian History) Spring 2015 Topic: China's Cultural Revolution.The Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, broke out more than thirty years ago (1966-1976), has been recognized as the darkest era in the history of the People's Republic of China. A comprehensive mass movement initiated by Mao Zedong to eliminate the so-called 'counterrevolutionary elements' in the country's institutions and leadership, the revolution was characterized by nationwide chaos, ultra-leftist frenzy, political zealotry, purges of intellectuals, extreme social turmoil, and ultimate economic collapse. This course intends to reconstruct the history of the Cultural Revolution by revealing the causes of the calamity and prevent human disaster from repeating itself in the future. Prerequisite: One course in Asian history or permission of the instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement)
    Cross-listed as: HIST 340
  • ASIA 309: Problems Modern Chinese Hist: Film
    (Problems in Modern Chinese History: Film) What are the enduring problems of modern China? How have different Chinese governments confronted them? We will study twentieth-century transformations in Chinese society, politics, and culture on the mainland and Taiwan in the light of modern Chinese and international history through film and discussion of the major issues addressed by Western scholarship. Basic topics to be covered include Sino-Western relations; tradition and modernization; peasant rebellions; revolution and reforms; religion; culture and society; modern science; and intellectuals and the state. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: HIST 342
  • ASIA 310: East-West Seminar
    (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • ASIA 311: Stereotyping Indian Cities
    Stereotyping Indian Cities: 'Hindu' or 'Muslim.' This seminar analyzes the controversial aspects of Indian urbanization through case studies of ancient cities, pilgrimage centers, Mughal capitals, and colonial British metropolises. We will examine archaeological evidence, maps, official histories, travelogues, and regional literature on the Indian cities. We will analyze the colonial interpretation of Indian history as a contestation of two homogenous religious communities—Hindu and Muslim—and explore recent challenges to that model. The students will be involved in scholarly debates through a variety of written projects, including critical reviews and a research essay, as well as oral presentations. No prerequisite. HIST 202/203 recommended. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement).
    Cross-listed as: HIST 348, ISLM 311
  • ASIA 312: Chinese Oral & Written Proficiency
    This course is a continuation of Chinese 212. The focus will be on oral and written expression in cultural context, expanding vocabulary and enhancing understanding of Chinese grammar. Chinese idiomatic expressions and various aspects of Chinese culture will also be explored throughout the course. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: CHIN 312
  • ASIA 313: Business Chinese
    This course develops students' Chinese proficiency in a business environment. Students continue to develop an adequate set of language skills in a communicative context while being aware of Chinese socio-cultural issues. It includes a concurrent emphasis on business terminology, conducting business negotiations, reading newspapers, magazines, and other business-related documents, and understanding economic trends and situations in modern China. Particularly recommended for students who are thinking of careers in economics, business, politics, and international relations. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: CHIN 313
  • ASIA 314: Hindu Pilgrimage: India and Chicago
    The course explores the ritual practice of pilgrimage at major pilgrimage sites in India, and at parallel temples in the Chicago area. Using extensive field visits and the framework of pilgrimage as the structure of the course, the class prepares for and visits 5-6 Hindu temples in the Chicago area to observe rituals being performed, speak with practitioners, and experience festival worship. Through reading and film, we examine the history, literature, ritual traditions, art, and music of Hindu pilgrims. Following specific pilgrimage routes, we explore this religious practice as it is conducted within 21st century cultures of expanding global communities, in India and in Chicago. The class will use primary source texts, maps, field visits to temples, film, and research to understand Hindu religious communities in India and Chicago. Prerequisite: Religion 214 or permission of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • ASIA 315: Japonisme/Occidentalism

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  • ASIA 316: Walking to Heaven: Pilgrimage Asia
    Using a seminar format, this course will explore pilgrimage sites in a range of different Asian cultures including India, China, Japan, Korea, and Pakistan. Students will choose a specific pilgrimage site and religious tradition as the focus of their research. Through reading, film, discussion, research, and student presentations, we will examine the roles of pilgrims and traders, sacred place and sacred time, and the ritual elements present in Asian pilgrimage practices across different religious traditions including Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Christianity. Prerequisite: Religion 213, 214, 215 or 216 or permission of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • ASIA 317: Islamic Cultures in South Asia
    This seminar focuses upon the shared history and cultural heritage of Muslims in the Indian sub-continent. It will cover the Muslim experience from the conquest of Sindh (750 CE), through the medieval and early modern empires, to the events leading to the partition of the Indian subcontinent (1947), bringing the story to the present. Questions of identity, assimilation, and integrative processes will be examined through an exploration of political, administrative, and intellectual history. The experiences, thoughts, and perspectives of mystics, poets, and women will be highlighted to investigate the role of Muslims in shaping and enriching the cultures, society, and religious traditions of the Indian subcontinent. Prerequisite RELG/ISLM 213 or permission of instructor. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: HIST 345, ISLM 317, RELG 317
  • ASIA 318: Buddhism and Social Activism
    This course will explore the development of Buddhist teachings and practice with a particular focus on the lives of contemporary Buddhist practitioners in Asia, North America, and Europe. In the past forty years, Buddhist organizations and teachers around the globe have become leaders of environmental movements, human rights activism, prison work, the education of impoverished communities, women's rights advocacy, and hospice care. Socially engaged Buddhism is now addressed as a bonafide Buddhist practice within many Buddhist communities from Japan and Vietnam to Thailand, Burma, India, and North America. Structured as a seminar, this course will allow students to research a specific aspect of contemporary Buddhist practice, examining the relationship between social engagement and deepening spiritual understanding.
    Cross-listed as: RELG 318
  • ASIA 319: Race & Empire in Colonial S Asia
    (Race and Empire in Colonial South Asia) This course studies colonialism as a cultural project of power, including the connections between imperialism, race, and colonial ideologies of rule in India from the inception of British rule in the mid-eighteenth century until independence in 1947. More specifically, it examines the various ways in which colonial state power was shaped by class, race and gender as the British sought to 'civilize' and rule their Indian subjects. The course also probes some of the ways in which various social groups in India engaged with colonial racial categories and the rhetoric of race during the period of the struggle against British rule. Scholarly accounts will be supplemented by films and literary works to illuminate the various themes under study. Prerequisite: Hist 202 or 203 or permission of the instructor. (Meets the GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
    Cross-listed as: HIST 347
  • ASIA 322: Emerging Markets Analysis
    Analysis of emerging markets of East Asia and Latin America, paying particular attention to growth strategies and the impact of market reforms, financial markets development, and foreign capital flows on economic performance of these countries. The course relies on case studies from Asian countries of China, South Korea, Thailand, Singapore, and Hong Kong and Latin American economies of Brazil, Argentina, Mexico, and Chile. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.) Prerequisite: ECON 220
    Cross-listed as: BUSN 322, LNAM 322
  • ASIA 330: World Performance
    (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement.)
  • ASIA 333: Chinese Cinema
    This course provides a historical, critical, and theoretical survey of Chinese cinema, broadly defined to include films from Mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. We will look at the specific political, social, economic, technological and aesthetic factors that have influenced the shape and character of Chinese cinema over the last century. We will discuss a range of works by internationally directors, including Zhang Yimou, Feng Xiaogang, Stephen Chow, Ang Lee, etc. As this course serves as a general introduction to Chinese film, it is intended for students who have little or no knowledge of China. All films screened for the course have English subtitles, so no knowledge of the Chinese language is required.
    Cross-listed as: CHIN 333
  • ASIA 420: China, Japan and the West
    This seminar situates the long history of China, Japan and the West in a world historical context, examining the multiple interactions between China and its partners and adversaries in the past. We will touch on sweeping themes, such as the traditional Chinese tribute system, the formation of empire and efforts to create modern nation-states in China and Japan, industrialization and capitalism, Western imperialism, and cultural interchange between China and Japan and the West, through specific historical topics, using primary sources where possible. The goal of this course is to encourage students who are interested in History to develop their capacity to use analytical skills in historical research.
    Cross-listed as: HIST 420
  • ASIA 471: Asian Bus Culture & Trade Relations
    Asian Business Culture and Trade Relations. As China, Singapore, South Korea, and Taiwan expand trade activities and increase their global influence, other Asian nations (Cambodia, Laos, Malaysia, Vietnam) continue to face economic hardships. This course will address geographic, historic, cultural, economic, and political factors that influence business opportunities, economic development, and quality of life in Asia. An emphasis will be on regional and global trade relations related to health care, infrastructure, food distribution, telecommunications, and education/job training. Instructional experiences will include field research involving Chicago-area resources along with analytic activities and case problems for business organizations operating or considering operations in Asia. (May be taken by business and Asian studies majors to meet GEC Senior Studies Requirement. Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement if not used for GEC Senior Studies Requirement.). Prerequisites: BUSN 130 (or BUSN 180), BUSN 230, ECON 210, ECON 220, and FIN 210 (or FIN 237); or permission of instructor for Asian Studies majors.
    Cross-listed as: BUSN 471
  • ASIA 489: Globalization and Its Impact
    Examines the impact of globalization on rich countries (the United States) and poor countries (Mexico, India, and China). An examination of free trade agreements will cast light on the political motives behind these agreements as well as the economic projections made. The economic impact of the creation of free trade zones is explored using both microeconomics and macroeconomics. Statistical evidence will document whether globalization has caused growth in GDP, employment, and income in poor countries. The responsibility of multinational companies in creating sweatshops, worker exploitation, and cultural disintegration are discussed in light of U.S. businesses located in Mexico, India, and China. (Meets GEC Cultural Diversity Requirement. May be taken by economics and business majors to meet GEC Senior Studies Requirement.) Prerequisites: Economics 110, 180, 210, and 220.
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  • ASIA 493: Research Project
    Independent research plus regular discussions of that research in meetings of students and faculty. (Students registering for a research project over two semesters would register for regular research project credit in the semester without the colloquium.) Open to senior majors and others with permission of the chair.
  • ASIA 494: Senior Thesis
    Senior thesis project plus regular discussion of that research in meetings of students and faculty. (Students writing a thesis over two semesters would register for regular thesis credit in the semester without the colloquium.) Open to senior majors.