Requirements

  • Minor in African American Studies

    No major is currently available.

    The Minor in African American Studies requires 6 credits as described below.

    Required Courses:

    • African American Studies 110: Introduction to African American Studies
    • African American Studies 216: African American Literature I
    • Independent Research Project to be approved by the African American Studies Chair.

     

    Three Elective Courses:

    Select courses from the following list. One of the three courses must be at the 300-level.

    • African American Studies 312: Black Metropolis: A Study of Black Life in Chicago
    • Communication 380: Black Cinema
    • English 217: African American Literature II
    • English 218: Blues Women in African American Literature
    • English 325: Black Literature of the 60s and its Legacy
    • English 351: Junior Colloquium. Content varies depending on topic. Fulfills minor only when topic emphasizes African American experiences.
    • History 226: American Civil War
    • History 230: African American History
    • History 306: Civil Rights Movement
    • Islamic World Studies 210: History of African American Muslims
    • Music 110: Jazz Ensemble
    • Music 219: African American Music
    • Music 227: History of Jazz
    • Philosophy 258: Spike Lee and Black Aesthetics
    • Philosophy 271: African American Philosophy
    • Politics 212: Politics of the Third World
    • Politics 214: The Politics of South Africa
    • Politics 217: African Politics
    • Politics 234: Urban Politics
    • Politics 262: Race and Politics in the Age of Obama
    • Politics 318: Topics in Comparative Politics: Women in the Third World
    • Politics 328: Topics in American Politics: Race
    • Psychology 205: Stereotypes, Prejudice, and Discrimination
    • Sociology and Anthropology 221: Peoples & Cultures of Modern Africa
    • Sociology and Anthropology 235: Racism and the African American Experience
    • Sociology and Anthropology 361: Cultural Anthropology
    • Theater 336: African American Theater
  • Major and Minor in American Studies

    The Major in American Studies requires at least nine credits, while the Minor requires at least six credits. 

    Requirements for the Major:

    • American Studies 110: Introduction to American Studies 
    • At least one section of American Studies 200: Topics
    • At least one course in American politics or history 
    • At least one course in American literature, art, or music 
    • Four electives chosen in consultation with the American Studies advisor 
    • Senior Seminar requirement: American Studies 480

    At least one course toward the major must be taken at the 300-level, and at least two courses toward the major must deal with issues and material related to African American Studies. 

    Requirements for the Minor:

    • American Studies 110: Introduction to American Studies 
    • American Studies 200: Topics
    • Four electives chosen in consultation with the American Studies advisor 

    At least one course toward the minor must deal with issues and materials related to African American studies.

  • Major and Minor in Area Studies

    All concentrations within the Area Studies Major require a minimum of 11 course credits, and some concentrations require more credits. The Minor in Area Studies requires at least six credits.

    Requirements for the Major:

    Because of the wide range of possible concentrations within the major, each student works out an individual study plan in consultation with an Area Studies advisor. The study plan must include examination of the following aspects of the chosen area:

    • history
    • society and economy
    • political life
    • culture

    Where instruction in the language appropriate to the area is offered on campus, proficiency in that language is required.

    Each major is required either to write a senior thesis or to complete an approved program of study abroad in the region of specialization and write a senior studies paper.

    Some Area Studies credits may be independent study (tutorials and research projects, including the senior thesis) or may be language courses at the intermediate level or above (beginning with third-semester college-level courses).

    Study-abroad opportunities include Lake Forest College off-campus programs and programs of the Associated Colleges of the Midwest as well as other approved programs. Students are encouraged to consult with members of the Area Studies Committee regarding appropriate study plans, courses, and off-campus programs.

    Examples of possible Area Studies concentrations:
    • African Studies:  Combines courses in politics, economics, history, literature, sociology and anthropology, and  religion.
    • European Studies:  Combines work in a language (e.g., French, German or Spanish) with courses in history, politics, literature, art, economics, and philosophy.
    • Middle Eastern Studies:  Combines courses in politics, economics, and religion with work in history and sociology and anthropology.
    • Russian and East European Studies:  Combines courses in history, politics, economics, religion, and literature

    Requirements for the Minor:

    An Area Studies minor requires the same range of courses covering a country or region as for the major, minus the thesis and foreign language requirements.

    A minor must include at least six courses on the chosen area of study that deal with

    • history
    • society and economy
    • political life
    • culture

    These six courses, as in the case of the major, may be taken as tutorials or programs of study abroad, but at least one course must be at the 300 level or above. The courses are to be chosen in consultation with members of the Area Studies Committee.

  • Major and Minor in Art

    Students studying in art may choose between a concentration in studio art or an art history concentration.  Both concentrations in the Major in Art require at least nine credits, while both concentrations in the Minor in Art require at least six credits.

    Requirements for the Major:

    Regardless of track, all students majoring in Art must take Art 110 and Art 130 early in their time at Lake Forest:

    Courses taken with the Credit-D-Fail option do not count toward the Art major.

    Art History Track 
    • Art 110
    • Art 130
    • Art 131
    • At least 3 Art History courses at the 200-level
    • At least 1 Art History course at the 300-level
    • An Art History elective course
    • Art 485 fulfills the Senior Studies requirement. Exceptional students may, in addition, undertake a senior thesis in Art History, Art 494, directed by a member of the faculty.

    Credit toward the art history major requires a grade of C or better in art history courses.

    Art history majors planning to go on to graduate study are advised to acquire a reading knowledge of at least one foreign language, preferably French or German.

    Studio Art Track
    • Art 110
    • Art 130
    • Art 131
    • At least 3 additional studio art course, at least 1 at the 300 level
      • One studio art course must be hands-on study of a two-dimensional discipline. Students may choose from:
        • Art 230: Painting
        • Art 231: Figure Drawing
        • Art 331: Advanced Drawing
        • Art 335: Mixed Media
      • One studio art course must be hands-on study of a three-dimensional discipline. Students may choose from:
        • Art 233: Sculpture
        • Art 236: Ceramics
        • Art 333: Advanced Sculpture
    • Art 218 or Art 360
    • At least 1 additional art history course
    • Art 480 or Art 481 fulfills the Senior Studies requirement. Exceptional students may, in addition, undertake a senior creative project or thesis project in art, Art 492, directed by a member of the faculty.

     

    Credit toward the studio art major requires a grade of C or better in studio art courses.

    Requirements for the Minor:

    As with the major, the Art Department offers a minor in two tracks. 

    Art History Track
    • Art 110
    • Art 130
    • At least 1 additional studio art course
    • At least 3 additional art history courses

    Studio Art Track

    • Art 110
    • Art 130
    • At least 1 additional art history course
    • At least 3 additional studio art courses
  • Major and Minor in Art

    Students studying in art may choose between a track in studio art or an art history track. Both tracks in the Major in Art require at least ten credits, while both tracks in the Minor in Art require at least six credits.  Regardless of track, courses taken with the Credit-D-Fail option do not count toward the Art major.

    Requirements for the Major:

    Art History Track

    The Art History Track requires a minimum of 10 courses. At least 3 courses must be at the 300- or 400-level, and must not double-count for any other major or minor. A grade of C or better is required for all art history courses counting toward the major.

    Legacy requirements

    Students who declared the Art Major before these requirements were put into place are not required to complete the new requirements, although it is recommended that they do so. This will include any student who has declared the Art Major before the beginning of the 2011-2012 academic year.

    Required Courses:

     The following should be taken in the first or second year:

    • ArtH 110: Introduction to Visual Arts
    • Art 130: Elements of Design
    • Art 131: Drawing OR Art 133: Three-Dimensional Foundations

    Three period survey courses:

    •  Choose at least one from Ancient to Renaissance:

    ArtH 210: Ancient Art

    ArtH 211: Medieval Art

    ArtH 212: Italian Renaissance Art

    ArtH 223: Northern Renaissance Art, or the Greece Program

    ArtH 380: Renaissance Art and Domesticity

    • Choose at least one from Early Modern to c. 1900:

    ArtH 215: European Art 1600-1750

    ArtH 217:  Nineteenth Century Art

    ArtH 219: American Art

    ArtH 224:  History of Prints

    ArtH 226: Colonial Latin American Art

    • Choose at least one from the 20th or 21st century:

    ArtH 218: Twentieth Century Art

    ArtH 222: History of Photography

    ArtH 355: The Art of the Sixties

    ArtH 360: Contemporary Art

    Three Art History electives:

    • Choose at least three from:

    ArtH 202: Greece in the Bronze Age

    ArtH 203: Greece in Classical-Roman Ages

    ArtH 204: Greece in Byzantine-Medieval Ages

    ArtH 205: Japanese Art and Culture

    ArtH 206: Chinese Art and Culture

    ArtH 210: Ancient Art

    ArtH 211: Medieval Art

    ArtH 212: Italian Renaissance Art

    ArtH 215: European Art 1600-1750

    ArtH 217: Nineteenth Century Art

    ArtH 218: Twentieth Century Art

    ArtH 219: American Art

    ArtH 220: History of Architecture

    ArtH 221: Modern Architecture

    ArtH 222: History of Photography

    ArtH 223: Northern Renaissance Art

    ArtH 224: History of Prints

    ArtH 225: American Architecture

    ArtH 226: Colonial Latin American Art

    ArtH 238: Curating an Art Collection

    ArtH 280: Architecture in East Asia

    ArtH 286: Topics in Islamic Art

    ArtH 306: Buddhist Arts of Asia

    ArtH 320: Landscape and Representation

    ArtH 322: Sight, Site & Insight

    ArtH 323: Monuments and Memory

    ArtH 325: Women, Art and Society

    ArtH 326: Gender Identity in Modern Art

    ArtH 350: Museum/Gallery Practicum

    ArtH 355: The Art of the Sixties

    ArtH 360: Contemporary Art

    ArtH 380: Renaissance Art and Domesticity

    Senior Seminar in Art History:

    • All Art History Track Majors must take ArtH 485 Seminar: Means and Methods of Art Historians in the Fall Semester of their senior year.

    Senior Thesis in Art History

    Exceptional students may choose to undertake a Senior Thesis in Art History, ArtH 494, directed by a member of the faculty. Proposals must be submitted in the semester before the one in which the thesis is to take place, and must be approved by the faculty member directing it and by the Chair of the Department. ArtH 494 is taken for one credit in the Spring Semester of senior year, only after completion of ArtH 485. Students earning distinction on their Senior Thesis, and graduating with a GPA of 3.5 or better within the major will be awarded honors in the Department of Art and Art History.

    Art history majors planning to go on to graduate study are advised to acquire a reading knowledge of at least one foreign language, preferably French or German.

    Studio Art Track

    The Studio Track requires a minimum of 10 courses. At least 3 courses must be at the 300- or 400-level, and must not double-count for any other major or minor. A grade of C or better is required for all studio art courses counting toward the major.

    Legacy requirements

    Students who declared the Art Major before these requirements were put into place are not required to complete the new requirements, although it is recommended that they do so. This will include any student who has declared the Art Major before the beginning of the 2011-2012 academic year.

    Required Courses:

    The following introductory courses should be taken in the first or second year:

    • Art 130: Elements of Design
    • Art 131: Drawing
    • ArtH 110: Introduction to Visual Arts
    • One Art History course in 20th Century or Contemporary Art: 

    ArtH 218: Twentieth Century Art OR ArtH 360: Contemporary Art

    • One Art History Elective:

    Choose one from:

    ArtH 202:Greece in the Bronze Age

    ArtH 203: Greece in Classical-Roman Ages

    ArtH 204: Greece in Byzantine-Medieval Ages

    ArtH 205: Japanese Art and Culture

    ArtH 206: Chinese Art and Culture

    ArtH 210: Ancient Art

    ArtH 211: Medieval Art

    ArtH 212: Italian Renaissance Art

    ArtH 215: European Art 1600-1750

    ArtH 217: Nineteenth Century Art

    ArtH 218: Twentieth Century Art

    ArtH 219: American Art

    ArtH 220: History of Architecture

    ArtH 221: Modern Architecture

    ArtH 222: History of Photography

    ArtH 223: Northern Renaissance Art

    ArtH 224: History of Prints

    ArtH 225: American Architecture

    ArtH 226: Colonial Latin American Art

    ArtH 238: Curating an Art Collection

    ArtH 280: Architecture in East Asia

    ArtH 286: Topics in Islamic Art

    ArtH 306: Buddhist Arts of Asia

    ArtH 320: Landscape and Representation

    ArtH 322: Sight, Site & Insight

    ArtH 323: Monuments and Memory

    ArtH 325: Women, Art and Society

    ArtH 326: Gender Identity in Modern Art

    ArtH 350: Museum/Gallery Practicum

    ArtH 355: The Art of the Sixties

    ArtH 360: Contemporary Art

    ArtH 380: Renaissance Art and Domesticity

    • One studio course in a hands-on 2D discipline: 

    Choose at least one from:

    Art 230: Painting

    Art 231: Figure Drawing

    Art 250: Printmaking

    Art 331: Advanced Drawing

    Art 335: Mixed-Media

    • One studio course in a hands-on 3D discipline:

    Choose at least one from:

    Art 233: Sculpture

    Art 236: Ceramics

    Art 333: Advanced Sculpture

    Art 334: Installation Art

    • Two additional elective studio art courses:

    Choose at least two from:

    Art 133: Three-Dimensional Foundations

    Art 142: Digital Design Foundations

    Art 230: Painting

    Art 231: Figure Drawing

    Art 232: Photography

    Art 233: Sculpture

    Art 235: Illustrating Children’s Books

    Art 236: Ceramics

    Art 237: Performance Art

    Art 244: Digital Art

    Art 250: Printmaking

    Art 252: Bookbinding for Artists and Authors

    Art 253: Graphic Design

    Art 277: Web Design and Development

    Art 322: Sight, Site & Insight

    Art 330: Advanced Painting

    Art 331: Advanced Drawing

    Art 332: Advanced Photography

    Art 333: Advanced Sculpture

    Art 334: Installation Art

    Art 335: Mixed-Media

    Art 342: Advanced Computer Imaging

    Art 343: Video Art

    Art 344: Digital Color Photography

    • Senior Seminar in Studio Art:

    All Studio Track Majors must take Art 480 Senior Seminar in Studio Art in the Fall Semester of their senior year.

    Senior Thesis in Studio Art:

    Exceptional students may choose to undertake a Senior Thesis in Studio Art, Art 494, directed by a member of the faculty. Proposals must be submitted in the semester before the one in which the thesis is to take place, and must be approved by the faculty member directing it and by the Chair of the Department. Art 494 is taken for one credit in the Spring Semester of senior year, only after completion of Art 480. Students earning distinction on their Senior Thesis, and graduating with a GPA of 3.5 or better within the major will be awarded honors in the Department of Art and Art History.

    Requirements for the Minor:

    As with the major, the Art Department offers a minor in two tracks.  Both studio art and art history will require a C (2.0) average across all courses counted toward that minor, with a minimum of a C- in each of those courses.

    Art History Track
    • ArtH 110
    • Art 130
    • At least 1 additional studio art course
    • At least 3 additional art history courses
    Studio Art Track
    • ArtH 110
    • Art 130
    • At least 1 additional art history course
    • At least 3 additional studio art courses
  • Major and Minor in Asian Studies

    The Major in Asian Studies requires at least nine credits, while the Minor in Asian Studies requires at least six credits.

    Requirements for the Major:

    • 8 Asian Studies courses, at least one of which is at the 300 level or above, including:
      • At least 1 course in Asian History (ASIA 200, 201, 202, 203, 283, 284, 286, 289, 307, 309, 319)
      • At least 1 course in Asian Philosophy (ASIA 275, 285, 305)
      • At least 1 course in Asian Religion (ASIA 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 220, 224, 245)
      • At least 2 Asian language courses – Introductory Chinese or Japanese or other relevant Asian language taught abroad or on campus (Chinese: ASIA 110, 112, 210, 212, 312; Japanese: ASIA 111, 113, 211, 219)
    • Senior Requirement, which students may satisfy by choosing one of the following: 
      • Asian Studies 493, one-semester research project
      • Asian Studies 494, 1-2 credit senior thesis
      • An Upper level course approved by the Chair of Asian Studies

    Off-campus study in Asia is strongly encouraged but not required.

    Courses offering significant Asia content, though not cross-listed as Asian Studies, may be approved by the chair to fulfill course requirements.

    Students who plan to pursue Asian Studies at the graduate level are advised to study language through the intermediate level and above.

    Optional Language Concentration in Chinese or Japanese

    Upon student request, and successful completion (grade of C or higher) of five courses in ONE of the target languages (Chinese OR Japanese), including no more than 2 courses at the 100 level, and including at least one course at the 300 level (or higher), Asian Studies majors or minors may be granted a transcript designation of “Asian Studies: Chinese Language Concentration” OR “Asian Studies: Japanese Language Concentration.” 

    Requirements for the Minor:

    • 6 Asian Studies courses, including at least 1 course or independent project at the 300-level or above.

    Minors can opt for the language concentration in Chinese or Japanese; see “Optional language concentration” above.

  • Entry to Biology 120 Organismal Biology

    (required for Biology and Neuroscience Majors and Minors, and health professions)

    Entering first-year students interested in introductory biology (BIOL 120: Organismal Biology) must take a science placement test to assess quantitative skills upon arrival on campus in August. This test consists of 20 basic algebra problems and is an established measure of readiness and likelihood of success in introductory Biology and Chemistry courses.  A score of 13/20 or better on the test is required for placement into BIOL 120 and CHEM 115: Chemistry I (see sequences below).  Students with scores of 12/20 or lower will be placed into CHEM 114: Foundations of Chemistry in the Spring Semester of the first year (see sequences below). The Biology Major can be completed successfully in four years through either of the sequences described below. 

    Students wishing to enter BIOL 120 and CHEM 115 in the fall of their second year and who have not completed CHEM 114 must take the science placement test in the spring of their first year.  Students who do not score 13/20 or better at this time may retake the placement test at the start of the Fall Semester. However it is not possible to complete a Biology Major in three years starting with CHEM 114 in the second year.

    Consult your advisor or the chair of the Biology Department for further explanation.

    Major and Minor in Biology

    Requirements for the Major:

    At least 8 credits in Biology, 2 credits in Chemistry, and 1 credit in Mathematics, as follows:

    • Biology 120: Organismal Biology – Taken concurrently with Chemistry 115
    • One of the Core Biological Inquiry courses (Biology 130-149) – Normally taken in spring of the first year
    • Biology 220: Ecology and Evolution (prerequisites: Biology 120 and Chemistry 115)
    • Biology 221: Molecules, Genes, and Cells (prerequisites: Biology 120 and Chemistry 116)
    • Three biology courses at the 300-level, at least two of which must be taken at Lake Forest College. At least two courses must include a laboratory component.  Choose from at least two of the three subject areas (see subject area table for upper level courses below):
      • Cellular and molecular biology
      • Organismal biology
      • Ecology and evolution
    • A senior studies course 
      • For non-thesis students: a Senior Seminar (topics change each semester)
      • For students engaged in senior thesis research: two course credits of Biology 494: Senior Thesis

    The following courses outside of the Biology Department are also required for the Major in Biology:

    • Chemistry 115 – Taken concurrently with Biology 120
    • Chemistry 116
    • Biology 150 (Reasoning and Statistical Inference in Biology) or Mathematics 110 (Calculus I) or Mathematics 150 (Introduction to Probability and Statistics) – completed by the end of the sophomore year (highly recommended prior to Biology 220).  Other applied statistics or mathematics courses may be counted for the biology major on a case-by-case basis.

    To graduate with a major in biology, a grade of C- or better is required for all courses counted toward the major.  Additionally, students must earn at least a C average (2.0) in all courses counted towards the major.

    Additional courses in organic chemistry, biochemistry, mathematics or statistics, and physics are strongly recommended for biology majors, particularly for those who anticipate applying to graduate schools and programs in the health professions (medical, dental, veterinary and others).

    Subject area Table for Upper Level Courses. 

    The three upper level courses for the major must come from at least two subject areas.

    Course

    Cell/Molecular

    Organismal

    Ecology/Evolution

    320 Microbiology

    x

    x

     

    322 Molecular Biology

    x

     

     

    324 Advanced Cell Biology

    x

     

     

    325 Topics in Advanced Cell Biology

    x

     

     

    330 Applied Data Analysis for Biologists

     

    x

    x

    340 Animal Physiology

    x

    x

     

    342 Developmental Biology

    x

    x

     

    344 Animal Behavior

     

    x

    x

    346 Molecular Neuroscience

    x

    x

     

    352 Molecular Genetics

    x

     

     

    360 Mechanisms of Neurodegeneration

    x

    x

     

    362 Mechanisms of Brain Dysfunction

    x

    x

     

    370 Ecology

     

     

    x

    372 Pharmacology

     x

     

     

    373 Community Ecology

       

    x

    374 Biogeography

       

    x

    375 Conservation Biology

     

     

    x

    384 Plant Biology

     

    x

    x

    389 Evolution

     

     

    x

     

    Requirements for the Minor:

    At least 6 credits in biology and 2 credits in chemistry

    • Chemistry 115 and 116
    • Biology 120: Organismal Biology – Taken concurrently with Chemistry 115
    • One of the Core Biological Inquiry courses (Biology 130-149) – Normally taken in the spring of the first year
    • Biology 220: Ecology and Evolution
    • Biology 221: Molecules, Genes, and Cells
    • Two biology courses at the 300-level

    To graduate with a minor in biology, a grade of C- or better is required for all courses counted toward the minor.  Additionally, students must earn at least a C average (2.0) in all courses counted towards the minor.

    Biology Major Course Sequences

    Chemistry 115/Biology 120 Introductory Sequence

    (students with score of 13/20 or better on the science placement test)

    First Year

    Fall: BIOL 120, CHEM 115

    Spring: One course from the BIOL 130-149 series, CHEM 116,

    (BIOL 150, MATH 110, or MATH 150 to be completed by the end of the second year)

    Second Year

    Fall: BIOL 220

    Spring: BIOL 221

    (BIOL 150, MATH 110 or MATH 150 to be completed by the end of the second year)

    Third and Fourth Years

    Three 300-level biology electives plus a Senior Seminar or Senior Thesis

    Chemistry 114 Introductory Sequence

    (students with score of 12/20 or lower on the science placement test)  

    First Year

    Spring: CHEM 114

    (BIOL 150, MATH 110 or MATH 150 to be completed by the end of the second year)

    Second Year

    Fall: BIOL 120, CHEM 115

    Spring: One course from the BIOL 130-149 series, CHEM 116

    (BIOL 150, MATH 110, or MATH 150 to be completed by the end of the second year)

    Third Year

    Fall: BIOL 220

    Spring: BIOL 221

    Fourth Year

    Three 300-level biology electives plus a Senior Seminar or Senior Thesis

     

  • Entry to Biology 120 Organismal Biology

    (required for Biology and Neuroscience Majors and Minors, and health professions)

    Entering first-year students interested in introductory biology (BIOL 120: Organismal Biology) must take a science placement test to assess quantitative skills upon arrival on campus in August. This test consists of 20 basic algebra problems and is an established measure of readiness and likelihood of success in introductory Biology and Chemistry courses.  A score of 13/20 or better on the test is required for placement into BIOL 120 and CHEM 115: Chemistry I (see sequences below).  Students with scores of 12/20 or lower will be placed into CHEM 114: Foundations of Chemistry in the Spring Semester of the first year (see sequences below). The Biology Major can be completed successfully in four years through either of the sequences described below. 

    Students wishing to enter BIOL 120 and CHEM 115 in the fall of their second year and who have not completed CHEM 114 must take the science placement test in the spring of their first year.  Students who do not score 13/20 or better at this time may retake the placement test at the start of the Fall Semester. However it is not possible to complete a Biology Major in three years starting with CHEM 114 in the second year.

    Consult your advisor or the chair of the Biology Department for further explanation.

    Major and Minor in Biology

    Requirements for the Major:

    At least 8 credits in Biology, 2 credits in Chemistry, and 1 credit in Mathematics, as follows:

    • Biology 120: Organismal Biology – Taken concurrently with Chemistry 115
    • One of the Core Biological Inquiry courses (Biology 130-149) – Normally taken in spring of the first year
    • Biology 220: Ecology and Evolution (prerequisites: Biology 120 and Chemistry 115)
    • Biology 221: Molecules, Genes, and Cells (prerequisites: Biology 120 and Chemistry 116)
    • Three biology courses at the 300-level, at least two of which must be taken at Lake Forest College. At least two courses must include a laboratory component.  Choose from at least two of the three subject areas (see subject area table for upper level courses below):
      • Cellular and molecular biology
      • Organismal biology
      • Ecology and evolution
    • A senior studies course 
      • For non-thesis students: a Senior Seminar (topics change each semester)
      • For students engaged in senior thesis research: two course credits of Biology 494: Senior Thesis

    The following courses outside of the Biology Department are also required for the Major in Biology:

    • Chemistry 115 – Taken concurrently with Biology 120
    • Chemistry 116
    • Biology 150 (Reasoning and Statistical Inference in Biology) or Mathematics 110 (Calculus I) or Mathematics 150 (Introduction to Probability and Statistics) – completed by the end of the sophomore year (highly recommended prior to Biology 220).  Other applied statistics or mathematics courses may be counted for the biology major on a case-by-case basis.

    In courses to be counted toward the major (biology, chemistry, and mathematics), students must maintain a minimum cumulative grade average of C to qualify for a degree in biology.

    Additional courses in organic chemistry, biochemistry, mathematics or statistics, and physics are strongly recommended for biology majors, particularly for those who anticipate applying to graduate schools and programs in the health professions (medical, dental, veterinary and others).

    Subject area Table for Upper Level Courses. 

    The three upper level courses for the major must come from at least two subject areas.

    Course

    Cell/Molecular

    Organismal

    Ecology/Evolution

    320 Microbiology

    x

    x

     

    322 Molecular Biology

    x

     

     

    324 Advanced Cell Biology

    x

     

     

    325 Topics in Advanced Cell Biology

    x

     

     

    330 Applied Data Analysis for Biologists

     

    x

    x

    340 Animal Physiology

     x

    x

     

    342 Developmental Biology

    x

    x

     

    344 Animal Behavior

     

    x

    x

    346 Molecular Neuroscience

    x

    x

     

    352 Molecular Genetics

    x

     

     

    360 Mechanisms of Neurodegeneration

    x

    x

     

    362 Mechanisms of Brain Dysfunction

    x

    x

     

    370 Ecology

     

     

    x

    372 Pharmacology

     x

     

     

    373 Community Ecology

       

    x

    374 Biogeography

       

    x

    375 Conservation Biology

     

     

    x

    384 Plant Biology

     

    x

    x

    389 Evolution

     

     

    x

     

    Requirements for the Minor:

    At least 6 credits in biology and 2 credits in chemistry

    • Chemistry 115 and 116
    • Biology 120: Organismal Biology – Taken concurrently with Chemistry 115
    • One of the Core Biological Inquiry courses (Biology 130-149) – Normally taken in the spring of the first year
    • Biology 220: Ecology and Evolution
    • Biology 221: Molecules, Genes, and Cells
    • Two biology courses at the 300-level

    Biology Major Course Sequences

    Chemistry 115/Biology 120 Introductory Sequence

    (students with score of 13/20 or better on the science placement test)

    First Year

    Fall: BIOL 120, CHEM 115

    Spring: One course from the BIOL 130-149 series, CHEM 116,

    (BIOL 150, MATH 110, or MATH 150 to be completed by the end of the second year)

    Second Year

    Fall: BIOL 220

    Spring: BIOL 221

    (BIOL 150, MATH 110 or MATH 150 to be completed by the end of the second year)

    Third and Fourth Years

    Three 300-level biology electives plus a Senior Seminar or Senior Thesis

    Chemistry 114 Introductory Sequence

    (students with score of 12/20 or lower on the science placement test)  

    First Year

    Spring: CHEM 114

    (BIOL 150, MATH 110 or MATH 150 to be completed by the end of the second year)

    Second Year

    Fall: BIOL 120, CHEM 115

    Spring: One course from the BIOL 130-149 series, CHEM 116

    (BIOL 150, MATH 110, or MATH 150 to be completed by the end of the second year)

    Third Year

    Fall: BIOL 220

    Spring: BIOL 221

    Fourth Year

    Three 300-level biology electives plus a Senior Seminar or Senior Thesis

     

     

     

  • Entry to CHEM 115: Chemistry I

    (required for Chemistry, Biology and Neuroscience Majors and Minors, and health professions)

    Entering first-year students interested in chemistry (CHEM 115: Chemistry I) must take a science placement test to assess quantitative skills upon arrival on campus in August. This test consists of 20 basic algebra problems and is an established measure of readiness and likelihood of success in Chemistry I.  A score of 13/20 or better on the test is required for placement into CHEM 115 (see sequences below).  Students with scores of 12/20 or lower will be placed into CHEM 114: Foundations of Chemistry in the Fall Semester of the first year (see sequences below).  The Chemistry Major can be completed in four years through either of the sequences described below.

    Students wishing to enter CHEM 115 in the fall of their second year and who have not completed CHEM 114 must take the science placement test in the spring of their first year. Students who do not score 13/20 or better at this time may retake the placement test at the start of the Fall Semester. However it is not possible to complete a Chemistry Major in three years starting with CHEM 114 in the second year. 

    Consult your advisor or the chair of the Chemistry Department for further explanation.

    Major and Minor in Chemistry

    The Major in Chemistry requires eight chemistry courses, two courses in calculus, and two courses in physics. The Department offers students the opportunity to concentrate in biochemistry. The Minor in Chemistry requires a minimum of six credits, including five chemistry courses and their pre-/co-requisites.

    Requirements for the Major:

    • Chemistry 115: Chemistry I
    • Chemistry 116: Chemistry II
    • Chemistry 220: Organic Chemistry I
    • Chemistry 221: Organic Chemistry II
    • Chemistry 320: Physical Chemistry I
    • Chemistry 321: Physical Chemistry II
    • 1 additional chemistry course selected from CHEM 300: Biochemistry, CHEM 340: Inorganic Chemistry, CHEM 430: Advanced Organic Chemistry, CHEM 490: Senior Thesis in Chemistry
    • 2 courses in calculus: MATH 110 (Calculus I) and MATH 111 (Calculus II)
    • 2 courses in physics:  PHYS 110 (Introductory Physics I) and PHYS 111 (Introductory Physics II), or PHYS 120 (General Physics I) and PHYS 121 (General Physics II)
    • Senior Studies, which may be satisfied  by Chemistry 410: Instrumental Analysis, or Chemistry 490: Senior Thesis in Chemistry.

    Biochemistry Concentration

    Students interested in a concentration in biochemistry should take the following courses:

    • Chemistry 115: Chemistry I
    • Chemistry 116: Chemistry II
    • Chemistry 220: Organic Chemistry I
    • Chemistry 221: Organic Chemistry II
    • Chemistry 300: Biochemistry
    • Chemistry 320: Physical Chemistry I
    • Chemistry 321: Physical Chemistry II
    • Chemistry 415: Topics in Biochemistry
    • 2 courses in calculus: MATH 110 (Calculus I) and MATH 111 (Calculus II)
    • 2 courses in physics:  PHYS 110 (Introductory Physics I) and PHYS 111 (Introductory Physics II), or PHYS 120 (General Physics I) and PHYS 121 (General Physics II )
    • Senior Studies, which may be satisfied by CHEM 410 (Instrumental Analysis) or CHEM 490 (Senior Thesis in Chemistry)

    Minor in Chemistry

    • Chemistry 115: Chemistry I
    • Chemistry 116: Chemistry II
    • Chemistry 220: Organic Chemistry I
    • Chemistry 221: Organic Chemistry II
    • Chemistry 300: Biochemistry (prerequisite BIOL 120) or CHEM 320: Physical Chemistry I (prerequisite:  MATH 110, MATH 111, and one year of physics – either PHYS 110 and PHYS 111, or PHYS 120 and PHYS 121)

    Recommended Chemistry major course sequences

    Beginning with CHEM 115 in Fall of the first year

    First Year

    Fall: CHEM 115: Chemistry I

    Spring: CHEM 116: Chemistry II

    (MATH 110: Calculus I and MATH 111: Calculus II to be completed by the end of the second year, encouraged in first year.)

    Second Year

    Fall: CHEM 220: Organic Chemistry I

    Spring: CHEM 221: Organic Chemistry II

    Third Year

    Fall: CHEM 320: Physical Chemistry I, CHEM 300: Biochemistry (optional)

    Spring: CHEM 321: Physical Chemistry II, CHEM 340: Inorganic Chemistry (optional)

    (Introductory Physics – PHYS 110 and PHYS 111, or General Physics – PHYS 120 and PHYS 121 to be completed by end of third year)

    Fourth Year

    Fall: CHEM 410: Instrumental Analysis, CHEM 300: Biochemistry (optional)

    Spring: CHEM 340: Inorganic Chemistry (optional), CHEM 430: Advanced Organic       Chemistry (optional), CHEM 490: Senior Thesis in Chemistry (optional)

    Note: Only one of the optional courses listed above is required, all are encouraged.

    Beginning with CHEM 114 in Fall of the 1st year or CHEM 115 in Fall of the second year

    First Year

    Fall: CHEM 114: Foundations of Chemistry

    Spring: no requirements for chemistry major

    (MATH 110: Calculus I and MATH 111: Calculus II to be completed by the end of the third year, encouraged as early as possible.)

    Second Year

    Fall: CHEM 115: Chemistry I

    Spring: CHEM 116: Chemistry II

    (Introductory Physics – PHYS 110 and PHYS 111, or General Physics – PHYS 120 and PHYS  121 to be completed by end of fourth year, but recommended in second year.)

    Third Year

    Fall: CHEM 220: Organic Chemistry I

    Spring: CHEM 221: Organic Chemistry II

    Fourth Year

    Fall: CHEM 320: Physical Chemistry I, CHEM 410: Instrumental Analysis, CHEM 300:   Biochemistry (optional)

    Spring: CHEM 321: Physical Chemistry II, CHEM 340: Inorganic Chemistry (optional),    CHEM 430: Advanced Organic Chemistry (optional), CHEM 490: Senior Thesis in            Chemistry (optional)

    Note: Only one of the optional courses listed above is required, all are encouraged.

     

  • Minor in Cinema Studies

    No major is available.

    Requirements for the Minor:

    At least 6 credits

    • Communication 212: Visual Rhetoric (required), formerly COMM 112: Introduction to Visual Communication 
    • Communication 275: Introduction to Film Studies (required)
    • 4 elective courses chosen from:
      • American Studies 200: Topics: The American West in Washington and Hollywood
      • Art 343: Video Art
      • Chinese 333: Chinese Cinema
      • Communication 375: Documentary Film Production
      • Communication 376: Queer Cinema
      • Communication 380: Black Cinema
      • Communication 390: Communication Internship – production-based (for 1 credit)
      • French / Foreign Civilizations 333: Exploring French Culture through Film
      • French / Foreign Civilizations 334: French Literature through Film
      • French 338: Cinéma Français
      • German 333: Modern German Film
      • History 360: History and the Moving Image
      • Music 266: Music in Film
      • Philosophy 248: Philosophical Issues in Documentary Film
      • Philosophy 255: Philosophy and Film
      • Philosophy 258: Spike Lee and Black Aesthetics
      • Philosophy 301: Romantic Comedies and Philosophy of Love
      • Philosophy 302: Philosophical Issues in Documentary Film
      • Religion 185: Film and Religion
      • Religion 245: Film and Religion: Asia and America
      • Sociology & Anthropology 285: Social Structure and Culture through Film
      • Spanish 333: Cine e Historia en América Latina
      • Spanish 334: Cine Español
      • Spanish 336: Latin American Film
      • Spanish 338: Cine Latinoamericano
      • Spanish 380: Fiction, Film, and Society in Latin America

    A maximum of three courses from any one department may count for the minor. 

    The minor also strongly recommends but does not require a production component. 

    Students majoring in Communication with a minor in Cinema Studies may double-count a maximum of two courses.

  • Minor in Classical Studies

    The Minor in Classical Studies has a six-credit requirement that is fulfilled through an innovative combination of on-site study in Greece and course work on campus. No major exists in this program area.

    The on-site component is provided by the College’s unique Program in Greece, which explores the art and culture of Greek civilizations from the Bronze Age, through the Classical Period, and into the Byzantine Era.  As a traveling program, classes are held at archaeological sites and in museums, which range from Agamemnon’s citadel at Mycenae and the Minoan palace of Cnossos, to the Acropolis of Periclean Athens, the Agora where Socrates engaged in philosophical debates, Apollo’s oracle at Delphi and the Orthodox monasteries of Meteora and Mistra.

    An on-campus track offers exposure to the literature, history and thought of Greece and Rome, combined with an on-campus survey of the art of these periods. Please consult the program chair for details.

    Requirements for the Minor:

    Students completing the minor receive 4 credits for participation in the Lake Forest Program in Greece and 2 credits from elective courses taken on campus. There is no language requirement for the minor, but for interested students and those with prior classical language study familiarity with either ancient Greek or Latin is encouraged.

    Students pursuing the minor in Classical Studies should apply to participate in the Lake Forest College Program in Greece during their sophomore or junior year. The program takes place every year during (and beyond) the spring semester. The program consists of a six-week on-campus preparatory course, and three courses conducted during travels throughout Greece from mid-March until the end of May.

    Program in Greece On-Campus (prerequisite) course:
    • Greek Civilizations 201: Ancient Greece: Life, Thought, and the Arts

     

    Program in Greece On-Site component (in Greece):
    • Greek Civilizations 202: Greece in the Bronze Age
    • Greek Civilizations 203: Greece in the Classical-Roman Ages
    • Greek Civilizations 204: Greece in the Byzantine-Medieval Ages

     

    On-Campus elective courses:
    • In addition to these 4 credits from the Program in Greece component, students obtaining the minor in Classical Studies select 2 additional courses from the following list:
      • Art 210: Ancient Art
      • History 204: Roman History
      • Philosophy 290: Ancient Greek Philosophy
      • Classical Studies 250: Classical Rhetorical Tradition (Cross-listed as Communication 250)
      • Classical Studies 275: Greek Greats
      • Sociology and Anthropology 216: Introduction to Archaeology
      • An appropriate tutorial or research project, approved by the Classical Studies program chair
      • Other, less frequently offered courses may also fulfill the elective requirement. Please consult the program chair to determine which courses are appropriate for this credit.
  • Major and Minor in Communication

    The Major in Communication requires at least nine credits, while the Minor in Communication requires at least six credits.

    Requirements for the Major:

    At least 9 credits

    • 5 courses at the 100- and 200-level
    • 2 courses from Group E (Rhetoric and Media courses at the 300- and 400-level)
    • Communication 390: Internship – 2 credits preferred  and Junior status required
    • Completion of the Senior Studies Requirement in 1 of the following ways:
      • Communication 420: Senior Seminar
      • Senior Thesis
      • Independent Study – Senior status required

    No more than two courses from outside of the Department of Communication count toward the major. The minimum grade for each course to count toward the major is C.  Courses taken Credit-D-Fail (with the exception of internships) will not count toward the major or minor.

    Requirements for the Minor:

    At least 6 credits

    • 1 Praxis course from Group A
    • 1 Rhetoric course from Group B
    • 1 Media course from Group C
    • 1 Rhetoric or Media course from Group B or Group C
    • 1 300-level course from Group E
    • 1 additional course chosen from:
      • Group E
      • Communication 390: Internship – 2 credits preferred  and Junior status required
      • Communication 420: Senior Seminar
      • Senior Thesis
      • Independent Study – Senior standing required

    No more than one course from outside Communication may count toward the minor.

    Groups of Communication Courses

             

    Group A: Praxis Courses

    • Communication 112: Visual Communication
    • Communication 120: Introduction to Journalism
    • Communication 135: Rhetoric and Speech
    • Philosophy 156: Logic and Styles of Argument

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    Group B: Rhetoric Courses

    • Communication 250: The Classical Rhetorical Tradition
    • Communication 251: Rhetorical History of the United States
    • Communication 253: Argumentation and Advocacy
    • Communication 255: Rhetorical Criticism

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    Group C: Media Studies Courses

    • Communication 275: Film Studies 
    • Communication 281: Theories of Mass Communication
    • Communication 283: Race, Culture and Media
    • Communication 285: Modern Media History
    • Communication 287: Media Systems and Institutions

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    Group D: Communication Across the College Courses

    • Art 242: Introduction to Computer Imaging
    • Communication 110: Introduction to Communication
    • Communication 268: Integrating Marketing with Journalism
    • Education 215: Instructional Communication Theory and Practice
    • History 275: Popular Music and American Society
    • Philosophy 255: Philosophy and Film
    • Philosophy 294: Philosophy of Language
    • Politics 224: Mass Media and American Politics
    • Sociology & Anthropology 246: Language and Culture

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    Group E

    • Communication 301: Communication Research Methods
    • Philosophy 310: Communication Ethics
    • Psychology 325: Sales Communications
    • Communication 350: Topics in Communication
    • Communication 370: Visual Rhetoric
    • Communication 372: Rhetoric of Economics and the Market
    • Communication 380: Black Cinema
    • Communication 381:  History and Theory of Freedom of Expression
    • Communication 382: Women’s Rhetoric and the Feminist Critique
    • Communication 383: New Media and Society
    • Communication 384: The Rhetorical Presidency
    • Communication 385: Public Sphere
    • Communication 386: Reading Popular Culture
    • Communication 387: Rhetoric of Law
    • Communication 388: Rhetoric and Public Memory
    • Communication 389: Political Economy of Media
    • Communication 391: Advanced Journalism

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  • The accelerated degree in communication is available only to students entering Lake Forest College with at least two AP Credits (with test scores of 4 or 5), or the equivalent of 2 Lake Forest College credits.

    To complete the major in three years, students must fulfill the regular graduation requirements–completing 32 credits, and completing all General Educational Curriculum requirements–and the requirements for the Communication major.  What follows is a suggested plan for study that applies to those students who matriculate with 2 Lake Forest College equivalent credits.

    Before Matriculation

    2 AP credits (with test scores of 4 or 5), or the equivalent of two Lake Forest College credits.

    First Year

    Nine Courses, including:

    • First-year Studies
    • Communication 110: Introduction to Communication (in the first semester)
    • Communication 255: Rhetorical Criticism (in the second semester)
    • 2 other 200-level courses from rhetoric or media studies

    Appropriate courses may count toward General Education Curriculum (GEC)

    Honors Fellows will be able to take their ninth credit in their spring semester for no additional fee; others pursuing this option will normally be required to pay a course overload fee.

    First Summer

    Two Courses:

    • 2 course credits, in either or both summer sessions, at the summer course tuition. Appropriate courses may count toward GEC.

    Second Year

    Nine Courses, including:

    • One 200-level course from rhetoric or media studies
    • Communication 301: Communication Research Methods
    • One more 300-level Communication course that counts toward the Communication major

    Students who have attained Dean’s List status will be able to take this ninth credit in their spring semester for no additional fee; others pursuing this option will normally be required to pay a course overload fee

    Second Summer

    • Communication 390: Internship (for 2 course credits)

     

    Third Year

    Nine Courses, including:

    • One 300-level Communication course that counts toward the Communication major
    • One Senior Seminar in Communication

    Students who wish to take part in the Lake Forest College In The Loop program are encouraged to do so prior to their 6th semester.
       
    Students who maintained Dean’s List status will be able to take the ninth credit in their spring semester for no additional fee; others pursuing this option will normally be required to pay a course overload fee.    

    With the exception of internships, courses taken Credit-D-Fail may not count toward the major. The minimum grade for each class to count toward the major is “C”.

     

  • Major and Minor in Communication

    The Major and Minor in Communication were redesigned in 2012 (see left navigation bar for requirements before Fall 2012).  All students must follow this set of requirements if they matriculated in the fall semester of 2012 or after.  The Major in Communication requires at least ten credits, while the Minor in Communication requires at least six credits.

    Requirements for the Major:

    At least 10 credits

    • COMM 110: Introduction to Communication
    • COMM 255: Rhetorical Criticism
    • 1 additional 200-level Rhetoric course
    • 2 200-level Media Studies courses
    • COMM 301: Communication Research Methods
    • 2 additional 300-level Communication seminars
    • COMM 390: Internship. Junior status required
    • Completion of the Senior Studies Requirement in one of the following ways:
      • COMM 420: Senior Seminar
      • COMM 492: Creative Project or COMM 493: Research Project (Senior Status Required for Senior Studies Requirement)
      • COMM 494: Senior Thesis in Communication

    The minimum grade for each course to count toward the major is C. Courses taken Credit-D-Fail (with the exception of internships) will not count toward the major or minor.

    Requirements for the Minor:

    At least 6 credits

    • COMM 110: Introduction to Communication
    • 1 200-level Rhetoric course (not COMM 212)
    • 1 200-level Media Studies course (not COMM 275)
    • COMM 255: Rhetorical Criticism
    • 2 300-level Communication seminars

    Groups of Communication Courses

    200-level Rhetoric Courses

    • COMM 212: Visual Rhetoric
    • COMM 250: The Classical Rhetorical Tradition
    • COMM 251: Rhetorical History of the United States
    • COMM 253: Argumentation and Advocacy
    • COMM 255: Rhetorical Criticism

    200-level Media Studies Courses

    • COMM 275: Film Studies
    • COMM 281: Theories of Mass Communication
    • COMM 283: Race, Culture and Media
    • COMM 285: Modern Media History
    • COMM 287: Media Systems and Institutions

    300-level Seminars

    • COMM 301: Communication Research Methods
    • PHIL 310: Communication Ethics
    • PSYC 325: Persuasion and Truth in Sales Communication
    • COMM 350: Topics in Communication
    • COMM 372: Rhetoric of Economics and the Market
    • COMM 373: Cultural Theory and Media Studies
    • COMM 374: Rhetorical Chicago
    • COMM 375: Documentary Production
    • COMM 376: Queer Cinema
    • COMM 380: Black Cinema
    • COMM 381: History and Theory of Freedom of Expression
    • COMM 382: Women’s Rhetoric and the Feminist Critique
    • COMM 383: New Media and Society
    • COMM 384: The Rhetorical Presidency
    • COMM 385: Public Sphere
    • COMM 386: Reading Popular Culture
    • COMM 387: Rhetoric of Law
    • COMM 388: Rhetoric and Public Memory
    • COMM 389: Political Economy of Media

  • Minor in Digital Media Design

    No major is currently available.

    Requirements for the Minor:

    At least 6 credits, including 4 required courses:

    • Computer Science 107: Introduction to Web Programming
    • Art 142: Digital Design Foundations OR Art 242: Introduction to Computer Imaging
    • Computer Science 270: Web Development
    • Art 370: Interactive Web Design
    • At least 2 electives, chosen from the following list:
      • Art 130: Elements of Design
      • Art 244: Digital Art
      • Art 253: Graphic Design
      • Art 342: Advanced Computer Imaging
      • Art 343: Video Art
      • Computer Science 112: Computer Science I
      • Computer Science 312: Client-Server Web Applications
      • Communication 212: Visual Rhetoric
      • Communication 281: Theories of Mass Communication
      • Communication 285: Modern Media History

      • Communication 383: New Media and Society
      • English 362: Creative Writing: New Media/Electronic Writing
      • An Art, Computer Science or Communication Web-related Internship
  • The Department of Economics and Business offers Majors and Minors in Economics, Business, and Finance. Students cannot double major within the Department of Economics & Business. Student also cannot have both a major and minor that are both from the Department of Economics & Business.

    Major and Minor in Economics

    Requirements for the Major in Economics:

    At least 9 credits

    • Economics 110: Principles of Economics
    • Mathematics 110: Calculus I –  completed by the end of the first year
    • Economics 180: Quantitative Methods for Economics and Business – Students who have taken this course will not receive credit for any other basic statistics course, including Mathematics 150. Students who have already taken such a statistics course may be able to count it toward the major if approved by the department.
    • Economics 210: Microeconomic Theory
    • Economics 220: Macroeconomic Theory
    • 3 additional economics courses – 2 must be at or above the 300-level, including all Finance electives and Business 322 (Emerging Markets Analysis). Internships do not count as economics elective courses.
    • Completion of the Senior Studies Requirement in 1 of the following ways:
      • 1 economics or finance course at the 400-level
      • Senior thesis

    Students must earn a grade of C- or better in Econ 110, 180, 210, 220 and Math 110.

    Requirements for the Minor in Economics:

    At least 6 credits

    • Economics 110: Principles of Economics
    • 1 of the following courses:
      • Economics 210: Microeconomic Theory
      • Economics 220: Macroeconomic Theory
    • 4 additional Economics or Finance (ECON or FIN prefix) courses –excluding internships

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    Major and Minor in Business

    Requirements for the Major in Business:

    At least 12 credits

    • Economics 110: Principles of Economics
    • 1 course in Mathematics, completed by the end of the first year, from the following:
      • Mathematics 110: Calculus I
      • Mathematics 160: Finite Mathematics with Applications
    • Business 180: Quantitative Methods for Economics and Business – Students who have taken this course will not receive credit for any other basic statistics course, including Mathematics 150. Students who have already taken such a statistics course may be able to count it toward the major if approved by the department.
    • Business 230: Financial Accounting
    • Finance 237: Introduction to Finance
    • Economics 210: Microeconomic Theory
    • Economics 220: Macroeconomic Theory
    • 1 course on ethics chosen from the following:
      • Philosophy 203: Business and Professional Ethics
      • Philosophy 325: Major Ethical Theories
    • 3 additional business or finance courses at the 300-level or above, excluding internships, that satisfy the following conditions:
      • 2 or fewer are marketing courses
      • 2 or fewer are courses from the following list:
        • Economics 310: Industrial Organization
        • Economics 313: Money and Banking
        • Economics 330: Econometrics
        • Economics 340: Environmental and Natural Resource Economics
        • Economics 350: Public Finance
        • Economics 370: Managerial Economics
        • Economics 430: International Trade Theory and Practice
    • Completion of the Senior Studies Requirement in 1 of the following ways:
      • 1 business course at the 400-Level
      • Senior thesis
      • Economics 430: International Trade Theory and Practice

    Students must earn a grade of C- or better in Econ 110, 180, 210 and 220; Math 110 or 160; Business 230; Finance 237; and Philosophy 203 or 325.

    Requirements for the Minor in Business:

    At least 6 credits

    • Economics 110: Principles of Economics
    • Business 230: Financial Accounting
    • Finance 237: Introduction to Finance
    • 3 additional Business or Finance (BUSN or FIN prefix) courses – excluding internships

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    Major and Minor in Finance

    Requirements for the Major in Finance:

    At least 11 credits

    • Economics 110: Principles of Economics
    • Mathematics 110: Calculus I – completed by the end of the first year. 
    • Economics 180: Quantitative Methods for Economics and Business – Students who have taken this course will not receive credit for any other basic statistics course, including Mathematics 150. Students who have already taken such a statistics course may be able to count it toward the major if approved by the department.
    • Business 230: Financial Accounting
    • Finance 237: Introduction to Finance
    • Economics 210: Microeconomic Theory
    • Economics 220: Macroeconomic Theory
    • Finance 380: Investment Analysis
    • 2 additional courses chosen from the following and excluding internships:
      • 300-level Finance electives (not counting Finance 380)
      • Business 315: Operations Management
      • Business 330: Intermediate Accounting
      • Business 331: Managerial Accounting
      • Business 350: Capital Budgeting
      • Economics 313: Money and Banking
      • Economics 330: Econometrics
    • Completion of the Senior Studies Requirement in 1 of the following ways:
      • 1 finance course at the 400-level
      • Senior thesis
      • Economics 431: International Finance

    Students must earn a grade of C- or better in Econ 110, 180, 210 and 220; Math 110; Business 230; and Finance 237.

    Requirements for the Minor in Finance:

    At least 8 credits

    • Economics 110: Principles of Economics
    • Mathematics 110: Calculus I
    • Economics 180: Quantitative Methods for Economics and Business
    • Business 230: Financial Accounting
    • Finance 237: Introduction to Finance
    • Finance 380: Investment Analysis
    • 2 additional 300-level Finance or Economics courses (FIN or ECON prefix courses from the Finance major) – excluding internships

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  • The Majors and Minors in Economics, Business, and Finance were redesigned in 2013 (see left navigation bar for requirements before Fall 2013). The new requirements will apply to all students who matriculate in Fall Semester 2013 or thereafter. Current students may choose to follow either the new requirements or the old requirements.

    The rules pertaining to repeated courses will apply to students who received a grade of C- or lower prior to Fall 2013 in BUSN/ECON 180, FIN 237, and FIN 380, and who wish now to re-take these courses in their newly numbered guises (respectively): BUSN/ECON/FIN 130, FIN 210, and FIN 320.

    The Department of Economics and Business offers Majors and Minors in Economics, Business, and Finance. Students cannot double major within the Department of Economics & Business. Student also cannot have both a major and minor that are both from the Department of Economics & Business.      

    Major and Minor in Economics

    Requirements for the Major in Economics:

    At least 10 credits

    • MATH 110: Calculus I
    • ECON 110: Principles of Economics
    • ECON 130: Applied Statistics – Students who have taken this course will not receive credit for MATH 150. Students who have already completed an equivalent college-level statistics course may have this requirement waived if approved by the department chair.
    • ECON 210: Microeconomic Theory
    • ECON 220: Macroeconomic Theory
    • ECON 330: Econometrics
    • 3 additional economics or finance courses (ECON or FIN prefix) – at least 2 must be at or above the 300-level. Internships do not count as economics elective courses, but BUSN 322 Emerging Markets Analysis can be counted as an Economics elective.
    • Completion of the Senior Studies Requirement in 1 of the following ways:
      • 1 economics or finance course (ECON or FIN prefix) at the 400-level excluding internships
      • Senior Thesis – talk to the Chair of the Department or see the Senior Thesis tab under Student Research on the webpage for requirements.

    Students must earn a grade of C- or better in ECON 110, 130, 210, 220 and MATH 110.

    Requirements for the Minor in Economics:

    At least 6 credits

    • ECON 110: Principles of Economics
    • MATH 110: Calculus I or MATH 160: Mathematical Methods with Applications
    • ECON 210: Microeconomic Theory or ECON 220: Macroeconomic Theory
    • 3 additional economics or finance courses (ECON or FIN prefix) at the 200-level or higher – excluding internships, but including ECON 130: Applied Statistics

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    Major and Minor in Business

    Requirements for the Major in Business:

    At least 12 credits

    • MATH 110: Calculus I or MATH 160: Mathematical Methods with Applications
    • ECON 110: Principles of Economics
    • BUSN 130: Applied Statistics – Students who have taken this course will not receive credit for MATH 150. Students who have already completed an equivalent college-level statistics course may have this requirement waived if approved by the department chair.
    • BUSN 230: Financial Accounting
    • ECON 210: Microeconomic Theory
    • ECON 220: Macroeconomic Theory
    • FIN 210: Financial Management
    • PHIL 203: Business and Professional Ethics or PHIL 325: Major Ethical Theories
    • 3 additional business, economics, or finance courses (BUSN, ECON, FIN prefix) at the 300-level or above, excluding internships, and with 2 or fewer being marketing courses
    • Completion of the Senior Studies Requirement in 1 of the following ways:
      • 1 business or finance course (BUSN or FIN prefix) at the 400-level, excluding internships
      • ECON 430: International Trade Theory and Practice
      • Senior Thesis – talk to the Chair of the Department or see the Senior Thesis tab under Student Research on the webpage for requirements.

    Students must earn a grade of C- or better in ECON 110, 210 and 220; MATH 110 or 160; BUSN 130 and 230; FIN 210; and PHIL 203 or 325.

    Requirements for the Minor in Business:

    At least 7 credits

    • ECON 110: Principles of Economics
    • MATH 110: Calculus I or MATH 160 Mathematical Methods with Applications
    • BUSN 130: Applied Statistics
    • BUSN 230: Financial Accounting
    • FIN 210: Financial Management
    • 2 additional Business (BUSN prefix) courses – excluding internships

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    Major and Minor in Finance

    Requirements for the Major in Finance:

    At least 12 credits

    • MATH 110: Calculus I
    • ECON 110: Principles of Economics
    • FIN 130: Applied Statistics – Students who have taken this course will not receive credit for MATH 150. Students who have already completed an equivalent college-level statistics course may have this requirement waived if approved by the department chair.
    • BUSN 230: Financial Accounting
    • ECON 210: Microeconomic Theory
    • ECON 220: Macroeconomic Theory
    • FIN 210: Financial Management
    • FIN 310: Corporate Finance
    • FIN 320: Investments
    • 2 additional courses chosen from the following:
      • 300-level or higher finance courses (FIN prefix), excluding internships
      • BUSN 330: Intermediate Accounting
      • BUSN 331: Managerial Accounting
      • ECON 313: Money and Banking
      • ECON 330: Econometrics
    • Completion of the Senior Studies Requirement in 1 of the following ways:
      • 1 finance course (FIN prefix) at the 400-level, excluding internships
      • Senior Thesis – talk to the Chair of the Department or see the Senior Thesis tab under Student Research on the webpage for requirements.

    Students must earn a grade of C- or better in ECON 110, 210 and 220; MATH 110; BUSN 230; FIN 130 and 210.

    Requirements for the Minor in Finance:

    At least 8 credits

    • MATH 110: Calculus I or MATH 160 Mathematical Methods with Applications
    • ECON 110: Principles of Economics
    • FIN 130: Applied Statistics
    • BUSN 230: Financial Accounting
    • FIN 210: Financial Management
    • FIN 310: Corporate Finance
    • FIN 320: Investments
    • 1 additional class from the following:
      • 200-level or higher finance course (FIN prefix), excluding internships
      • BUSN 330: Intermediate Accounting
      • BUSN 331: Managerial Accounting
      • ECON 313: Money and Banking
      • ECON 330: Econometrics

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  • Major in Education and Minor in Educational Studies

    The Department of Education offers a major in education for students interested in teacher licensure at the elementary (K-9), secondary (6-12), or K-12 levels. An interdisciplinary educational studies minor is offered for those students who have a strong interest in educational issues but do not wish to complete a teacher licensure program at the undergraduate level.

    A change in Illinois State Board of Education teacher licensure structure will take effect on September 1, 2015. This change will apply to current students who apply to the licensure program on or after September 1, 2015 and to all incoming students. Under the new structure, students will be able to select from the following endorsement options when applying to the Lake Forest College teacher licensure program:

    • Elementary Education (Grades 1-6)
    • Dual Elementary and Middle School Education (Grades 1-6; Grades 5-8)
    • Dual Secondary and Middle School Education (Grades 5-8; Grades 9-12)
    • K-12 Education: Art; Music; Spanish; and French

    The Education Department will make any necessary changes to current course requirements to ensure alignment with the new licensure structure. Current and incoming students are encouraged to work closely with their academic advisors to create a plan for course enrollment leading to application eligibility for the desired licensure program.

    Requirements for the Major in Education:

    Requirements in brief:

    All students in the teacher education program fulfill four sets of requirements to graduate with a recommendation for licensure:

    • Completion of the Lake Forest College GEC – see an advisor in the Department of Education for recommended courses
    • Completion of the course requirements within the Department of Education
    • Completion of a major outside of the Department of Education
      • for secondary education – a major in the content area of licensure
      • for elementary education – any content major at the College
    • Additional courses as necessary to meet Content Area Standards in broad fields for licensure

    Required Courses:

    The following courses are required for majors in secondary/K-12 education:

    • Education 210: Observing the School Process
    • Education 215: Instructional Communication
    • Choose 1 of the following:
      • Education / Philosophy 220: Philosophy of Education
      • Education / Sociology & Anthropology 244: Anthropology of Education
      • Education 270 / History 239: History of Education in American Society
    • Education 313: Reading Methods in the Content Areas
    • Education 314: Inclusive Learning Environments
    • Education 315: Middle School Fieldwork
    • Education 419: General Secondary Methods / Senior Seminar
    • Education 420: Discipline Specific Secondary Methods / Senior Seminar (only for those seeking Secondary licensure)
    • Education 421: Secondary Student Teaching
    • Education 422 Discipline-Specific K-12 Curriculum and Instructional Design / Senior Seminar (only for those seeking K-12 licensure)
    • Psychology 110: Introduction to Psychology
    • Psychology 210: Developmental Psychology

    The following courses are required for majors in elementary education:

    • Education 210: Observing the School Process
    • Education 215: Instructional Communication
    • Choose 1 of the following:
      • Education / Philosophy 220: Philosophy of Education
      • Education / Sociology & Anthropology 244: Anthropology of Education
      • Education 270 / History 239: History of Education in American Society
    • Education 303: Elementary Reading Methods
    • Education 304: Elementary Fieldwork
    • Education 306: Teaching Adolescent Students (only for those seeking middle school endorsement)
    • Education 312: Arts in the Learning Process
    • Education 314: Inclusive Learning Environments
    • Education 416: Elementary Content Area Literacy and Social Studies Methods / Senior Seminar
    • Education 417: Elementary Math and Science Methods / Senior Seminar
    • Education 418: Elementary Student Teaching
    • Physical Education 126: Concepts of Health Education
    • Psychology 110: Introduction to Psychology
    • Psychology 210: Developmental Psychology


      

    Requirements for the Minor in Educational Studies:

    At least 6 credits

    • 1 of the following courses:
      • Education 210:  Observing the Schooling Process
      • Education 212:  Education Reform in the U.S. 
    • 1 of the following courses:
      • Psychology 210:  Developmental Psychology
      • Psychology 318:  Psychology Applied to Education
    • 2 of the following courses:
      • History 239: History of Education in American Society
      • Philosophy 220:  Philosophy of Education
      • Sociology & Anthropology 244:  Anthropology of Education
      • Education 215:  Instructional Communication Theory and Practice
    • 2 of the following courses:
      • Communication 420: Senior Seminar: Kids/Media/Culture
      • Education 309: Immigration and Education: Race, Language, and American Schools
      • Education 310: Equity and Social Justice in Schools
      • Education 312: Integrating the Arts in the Learning Process
      • Education 314: Inclusive Learning Environments
      • Education 320: Comparative and International Education: Education as the Practice of Freedom
      • Education 363: Creative Writing: Children’s & Young Adult Literature
      • Education 450: Special Studies in Education (including the option for an approved internship)
      • English 232: The Teaching of Writing
      • International Relations 322/Education 322: Education and Development in Developing Countries
      • Psychology 318: Psychology Applied to Education
      • Sociology & Anthropology 350: Sociology of Knowledge
      • Sociology & Anthropology 385: Intellectuals and Society

    Stages of the Teacher Education Program at Lake Forest:

    Students wishing to complete the teacher education program will complete four stages:

      

    Stage 1: Becoming an Education Major
    • Meet with a faculty member in the Department of Education to:
      • declare the major
      • plan a tentative 4-year course of study to meet program requirements
      • learn about necessary state licensure exams
      • learn about other program requirements, including portfolio requirements
    • Agree to allow the College to conduct a criminal background check for school security purposes. Students must successfully pass such a check to maintain the education major.
    • Enroll in Education 210: Observing the School Process – introductory course in the major
      
    Stage 2:  Becoming a Teacher Candidate:  Entering a Teacher Education Program
    • Apply for entrance to the teacher education program – while enrolled in or after successfully completing Education 210 with a grade of B- or better (The course may be repeated only once to achieve this grade.)
    • Passing the Test of Academic Proficiency mandated by the Illinois State Board of Education (or submission of necessary ACT/SAT scores)
    • Submit materials to the Department of Education at the time of interviewing for program entrance
      • A copy of the student’s Lake Forest College transcript that indicates: 
        • A GPA of 2.75 or higher
        • A B- or better in Education 210
      • Successful completion of a portfolio of artifacts at Checkpoint #1 as described in the Developmental Portfolio Handbook
      • Evidence that he/she has adhered to the Lake Forest College Statement of Respect and Responsibility and has not violated any College policies in ways that call into question the candidate’s readiness for teaching as outlined in the Identifying Characteristics of a Lake Forest College Educated Teacher. This will be demonstrated through the following materials collected by the Education Department:
        • Academic advisor’s evaluation form
        • Dean of Students evaluation form
        • Education 210 instructor’s positive recommendation
    • Successfully pass an interview with members of the Department faculty. At the interview, students will be assessed on:
      • Seriousness of purpose/commitment
      • Oral communication skills
      • Academic skills including flexibility, maturity, and independence
      • Relevant experiences with targeted age group
    • The Department Chair will invite majors to interview based on readiness for program entry.  Readiness indicators include:
      • Grade point average
      • Performance in Lake Forest College courses required for education majors
      • Demonstrations of responsibility on campus, in the classroom, in field experiences, and in advising situations

    To maintain teacher education program candidacy, students must continue to sustain the above requirements.  Students will be exited from the program and will need to reapply if not all of the above requirements are sustained or if evidence is obtained that brings into question the candidate’s readiness for teaching as articulated in the Identifying Dispositions of a Lake Forest College Educated Teacher. 

    Students must become candidates before they can enter the pre-student teaching fieldwork practicum courses (Education 304; Education 315) in any of the teacher education programs.

      

    Stage 3:  Becoming a Student Teacher:  Application for Student Teaching

    Teacher candidates who successfully complete (with a B- or better) required education department pre-student teaching fieldwork practicum and methods coursework (EDUC 215 and all 300 and 400 level courses) may apply for a student teaching placement. All other courses (including GEC requirements) applied toward licensure or designations must be completed with a grade of C or better. This application process must be completed within the first three weeks of the semester prior to the requested student teaching placement.

    The following evidence must be presented by the Director of Clinical Partnerships to the Education Advisory Council:

    • Fieldwork supervisor’s recommendation for continuation in licensure program upon completion of pre-student teaching fieldwork practicum.
    • Evidence of completion of content-area or second major course of study before student teaching.
    • A transcript with a 2.75 GPA.
    • Successful completion of a portfolio of artifacts at Checkpoints #2a and #2b as described in the Developmental Portfolio Handbook
    • Passing score on secondary content-area or elementary content-area exam mandated by the Illinois State Board of Education.

    The Education Advisory Council can ask for additional evidence such as recommendations from course instructors, cooperating teachers, college personnel or additional portfolio artifacts.

    Following approval by the EAC, candidates will meet with the Director of Clinical Partnerships for further instructions on the placement process.

      

    Stage 4: Becoming a Licensed Teacher:  Application for Recommendation for Licensure

    The Licensure Officer will recommend student teachers for Licensure when the following is completed:

    • Application for License, including declaring citizenship and no felony charges,
    • Successful completion of a portfolio of artifacts at Checkpoint #3 as described in the Developmental Portfolio Handbook
    • Successful completion of the exit interview presentation (Checkpoint #4) as described in the Developmental Portfolio Handbook
    • Passing grade in student teaching and supervisor’s recommendation for licensure
    • Passing the Assessment of Professional Teaching exam mandated by the Illinois State Board of Education.

    For more details on course sequences and developmental checkpoints, see the Education Department Policies and Procedures Handbook and the Developmental Portfolio Handbook and the Education Major Planning Sheets.

    Academic Grievances for Teacher Education Students

    Teacher education candidates have the same academic rights and responsibilities as all Lake Forest College students. There are, however, specific situations in the teacher education program when decisions may be cause for student grievances. These situations include the following:

    • Admission to or dismissal from the teacher education program, a clinical experience, or student teaching
    • Evaluation of the candidate’s performance in courses, clinical experiences, or student teaching
    • Recommendation for state licensure or for employment

    Students who wish to appeal any of these teacher education matters should first confer with the chairperson of the Education Department. Appeals must be made in writing to the Education Advisory Council through the chairperson of the Education Department. Students may have personal, academic, or legal support in hearings concerning teacher education matters. The case may be further appealed to the Academic Appeals Board and, finally, to the President of the College.

  • Requirements for the Major and Minor – Prior to Fall 2010

    Requirements for the Major:

    At least 9 credits

    Literature Track
    • Classics of Literature Sequence (to be taken in chronological order): 
      • English 210: Ancient and Medieval Literature
      • English 211: English Literature I: The Renaissance and Eighteenth Century
      • English 212: English Literature II: The Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries
    • 2 period courses chosen from:
      • English 300: Medieval Studies: The Chaucerian and Arthurian Traditions
      • English 301: The Renaissance
      • English 302: John Donne and His Contemporaries
      • English 304: The Romantic Period
      • English 305: Victorian Literature
      • English 306: The English Novel
      • English 308: Renaissance Drama
      • English 316: Voices of Reform: Nineteenth-Century African American Writings
      • English 331: The Enlightenment
      • English 341: Romanticism: Revolutions in Self and Society 
      • English 345: Nineteenth-Century American Novels
      • English 400: Herman Melville
      • English 401: John Milton
      • English 402: Geoffrey Chaucer
      • English 403: Emily Dickinson
    • 1 course chosen from:
      • English 203: Early American Literature
      • English 204: Nineteenth-Century American Literature
      • English 216: African American Literature I
      • English 220: Shakespeare
      • English / Theater 255: Dramaturgy
      • or an additional period course from the list above
    • 1 of the following to complete the Senior Studies Requirement
      • English 450: Theory of Literature
      • Senior Thesis
    • at least 2 additional courses

    Majors in the literature track who plan to do graduate work in literary studies should consult with their advisors and orient their programs toward the period courses and have a reading knowledge of at least one modern foreign language, preferably French or German.

    Writing Track
    • Classics of Literature Sequence (to be taken in chronological order): 
      • English 210: Ancient and Medieval Literature
      • English 211: English Literature I: The Renaissance and Eighteenth Century
      • English 212: English Literature II: The Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries
    • 2 courses chosen from:
      • English 203: Early American Literature
      • English 204: Nineteenth-Century American Literature
      • English 216: African American Literature I
      • English 217: African American Literature II
      • English 218: Blues Women in African American Literature
      • English 220: Shakespeare
      • English 230 / Theater 257: Theater History I: Greeks to Shakespeare
      • English 253: Modern Irish Writers
      • English / Theater 255: Dramaturgy
      • English 300: Medieval Studies: The Chaucerian and Arthurian Traditions
      • English 301: The Renaissance
      • English 302: John Donne and His Contemporaries
      • English 304: The Romantic Period
      • English 305: Victorian Literature
      • English 306: The English Novel
      • English 308: Renaissance Drama
      • English 316: Voices of Reform: Nineteenth-Century African American Writings
      • English 322: Modern Poetry
      • English 323: Lake Forest College Press I: Book Editing
      • English 324: Lake Forest College Press II: Book Production
      • English 325: Black Literature of the 1960s
      • English 331: The Enlightenment
      • English 341: Romanticism: Revolutions in Self and Society
      • English 345: Nineteenth-Century American Novels
      • English 400: Herman Melville
      • English 401: John Milton
      • English 402: Geoffrey Chaucer
      • English 403: Emily Dickinson
    • English 235: Introduction to Creative Writing
    • 1 of the following (after completing English 235)
      • English 330: Advanced Nonfiction Writing
      • English 332: Environmental Writing
      • English 360: Creative Writing: Fiction 
      • English 361: Creative Writing: Poetry
      • English 363: Writing Children’s Literature
      • English 242 / Theater 270: Playwriting
    • 1 of the following to complete the Senior Studies Requirement:
      • English 440: Advanced Writing Seminar/Tutorial: Re-Writing Chicago
      • Senior Thesis
    • at least 1 additional course

    For either track: Special studies courses in which topics may vary from year to year may be taken more than once, but majors may count them only once toward the nine-course minimum for the major.

    Qualifying Examination for Majors

    Students declaring the English major will be required to pass a qualifying examination within two semesters of declaring. The examination will involve defining 25 terms descriptive of literary form. These 25 will be drawn from a list of 75 that the department distributes in all its courses. All required 200-level courses in writing and literature will involve discussion of these formal terms. Except in extraordinary circumstances, students will have two chances to pass the exam.

    Requirements for the Minor:

    At least 6 credits

    • Classics of Literature Sequence (to be taken in chronological order): 
      • English 210: Ancient and Medieval Literature
      • English 211: English Literature I: The Renaissance and Eighteenth Century
      • English 212: English Literature II: The Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries
    • 2 period courses chosen from:
      • English 300: Medieval Studies: The Chaucerian and Arthurian Traditions
      • English 301: The Renaissance
      • English 302: John Donne and His Contemporaries
      • English 304: The Romantic Period
      • English 305: Victorian Literature
      • English 306: The English Novel
      • English 308: Renaissance Drama
      • English 316: Voices of Reform: Nineteenth-Century African American Writings
      • English 322: Modern Poetry
      • English 323: Lake Forest College Press I: Book Editing
      • English 324: Lake Forest College Press II: Book Production
      • English 325: Black Literature of the 1960s
      • English 330: Advanced Nonfiction Writing
      • English 331: The Enlightenment
      • English 332: Environmental Writing
      • English 341: Romanticism: Revolutions in Self and Society
      • English 345: Nineteenth-Century American Novels
      • English 360: Creative Writing: Fiction 
      • English 361: Creative Writing: Poetry
      • English 400: Herman Melville
      • English 401: John Milton
      • English 402: Geoffrey Chaucer
      • English 403: Emily Dickinson
    • At least 1 additional course at 200-level or above

     

    Senior Rule

    The following rule applies to all seniors majoring or minoring in English: No written work submitted for any course offered within the English department shall be considered acceptable unless it is free of errors in grammar, punctuation, spelling, and usage.

  • Major in English

    We offer two areas of concentration: the Writing Track and the Literature Track.

    All majors learn how to read and interpret complex texts, how to relate one text to another and to a tradition, and how to read texts within historical and multicultural contexts. Majors who choose the writing track practice their craft with four targeted creative courses, including two intermediate workshops in topics such as fiction, new media writing, poetry, and environment writing. We offer literature courses organized in various ways, focusing on historical periods, single authors, literary types, thematic issues, multicultural literature, and gender issues.

    Requirements for the Major:

    At least 10 credits

    Literature Track
    • Classics of Literature Sequence (must be taken in chronological order): 
      • English 210: Ancient and Medieval Literature
      • English 211: English Literature I: The Renaissance and Eighteenth Century
      • English 212: English Literature II: The Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries
    • American Literature Sequence
      • 1 course from the 19th century or earlier
        • English 203: Early American Literature
        • English 204: Nineteenth Century American Literature
        • English 216: African American Literature 1
        • English 316: Voices of Reform: Nineteenth-Century African American Writings
        • English 345: Nineteenth-Century American Novels
      • 1 course from the 20th century or later
        • English 205: Twentieth-Century American Literature
        • English 206: American Environmental Literature
        • English 217: African American Literature II
        • English 218: Blues Women in African American Literature
        • English 224: Special Studies: Literature of the Vietnam War
        • English 228: Women Writing Women
        • English 250: Contemporary Literature
        • English 325: Black Literature of the 60s and its Legacy
        • English 326: Postmodernism
    • 2 period courses chosen from:
      • English 220: Shakespeare
      • English 262: The History of the Book and Beyond
      • English 301: The Renaissance
      • English 302: John Donne and His Contemporaries
      • English 304: The Romantic Period
      • English 305: Victorian Literature
      • English 306: 19th- and 20th- Century Novel
      • English 307: Novel Origins (formerly English 333 Rise of the Novel)
      • English 308: Renaissance Drama
      • English 309: The Chaucerian Tradition
      • English 310: The Arthurian Tradition
      • English 316: Voices of Reform: Nineteenth-Century African American Writings
      • English 321: Modern Fiction
      • English 322: Modern Poetry
      • English 331: The Enlightenment
      • English 336: British Women Writers
      • English 345: Nineteenth-Century American Novels
      • English 400: Herman Melville
      • English 401: John Milton
      • English 402: Geoffrey Chaucer
      • English 403: Emily Dickinson
      • English 404: W.B. Yeats
    • At least 2 electives, only one of which may be at the 100-level.
    • English 450: Theory of Literature to complete the Senior Studies Requirement (A senior thesis may be undertaken by approval of the Chair, but cannot be completed in lieu of the senior seminar.)
    Writing Track
    • Classics of Literature Sequence (must be taken in chronological order): 
      • English 210: Ancient and Medieval Literature
      • English 211: English Literature I: The Renaissance and Eighteenth Century
      • English 212: English Literature II: The Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries 
    • American Literature Sequence 
      • 1 course from the 19th century or earlier
        • English 203: Early American Literature
        • English 204: Nineteenth Century American Literature
        • English 216: African American Literature 1
        • English 316: Voices of Reform: Nineteenth-Century African American Writings
        • English 345: Nineteenth-Century American Novels
      • 1 course from the 20th century or later
        • English 205: Twentieth-Century American Literature
        • English 206: American Environmental Literature
        • English 217: African American Literature II
        • English 218: Blues Women in African American Literature
        • English 224: Special Studies: Literature of the Vietnam War
        • English 228: Women Writing Women
        • English 250: Contemporary Literature
        • English 325: Black Literature of the 60s and its Legacy
        • English 326: Postmodernism
    • Writing Courses
      • English 135: Creative Writing (formerly English 235)
      • 2 of the following:
        • English 242 / Theater 270: Playwriting
        • English 252 / Art 252: Bookbinding for Artists and Authors
        • English 360: Fiction Writing
        • English 361: Poetry Writing
        • English 362: New Media/Electronic Writing
        • English 363: Writing Children’s Literature
        • English 364: Creative Unwriting and Remix Workshop
        • English 365: Poetry and Nature
        • English 366: Creative Writing: The Essay
        • English 367: Environmental Writing (formerly English 332)
        • English 368: Advanced Nonfiction Writing (formerly English 330)
        • English 369: Professional Writing in the Digital Age
        • English 392: Publishing Practicum
    • Any English course at the 300 level or above, or English 220.  English 440 and English 450 do not count for this requirement (for those declaring the major from Fall 2012 onward) OR at least one elective (for those who declared the major beginning Fall 2010 and before the start of the Fall 2012 semester)
    • English 440: Advanced Writing Seminar/Tutorial: Re-Writing Chicago to complete the Senior Studies Requirement (A senior thesis may be undertaken by approval of the Chair, but cannot be completed in lieu of the senior seminar.)

     

    Requirements for the Minor:

    At least 6 credits

    • English 210: Ancient and Medieval Literature
    • 2 of the following 4 options  
      • English 211: English Literature I: The Renaissance and Eighteenth Century
      • English 212: English Literature II: The Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries(prerequisite English 211)
      • 1 course from the 19th century or earlier
        • English 203: Early American Literature
        • English 204: Nineteenth Century American Literature
        • English 216: African American Literature 1
        • English 316: Voices of Reform: Nineteenth-Century African American Writings
        • English 345: Nineteenth-Century American Novels
      • 1 course from the 20th century or later
        • English 205: Twentieth-Century American Literature
        • English 206: American Environmental Literature
        • English 217: African American Literature II
        • English 218: Blues Women in African American Literature
        • English 224: Special Studies: Literature of the Vietnam War
        • English 228: Women Writing Women
        • English 250: Contemporary Literature
        • English 325: Black Literature of the 60s and its Legacy
        • English 326: Postmodernism
    • 3 electives

     

    Senior Rule

    The following rule applies to all seniors majoring or minoring in English: No written work submitted for any course offered within the English department shall be considered acceptable unless it is free of errors in grammar, punctuation, spelling, and usage.

  • Minor in Entrepreneurship and Innovation

    No major is currently available.

    Requirements for the Minor:

    At least 6 credits, including 4 required courses:

    • ENTP 120: Introduction to Entrepreneurship
    • ENTP 345/BUSN 345: Principles of Marketing^
    • ENTP 350: Innovation, Franchising and Small Business Development
    • ENTP 380: Entrepreneurial Ventures

    At least 2 electives, chosen from the following list, with at most one at the 100-level:

    • ENTP 346/BUSN346: Entrepreneurial Marketing
    • ENTP 360/BUSN360: Social Entrepreneurship
    • ENTP 370/FIN 370: Entrepreneurial Finance
    • ART 142: Digital Design Foundations
    • ART 253: Graphic Design
    • ART 370: Interactive Web Design
    • CHIN 313: Business Chinese
    • CSCI 107: Introduction to Web Programming
    • CSCI 270: Web Development
    • ENGL 111: Introduction to Professional Writing
    • ENGL 369: Profesional Writing in the Digital Age
    • FREN 320: French for International Affairs and Business
    • LOOP 202: Professional Development in the 21st Century
    • PSYC 208: Psychology of Career Development
    • PSYC 345: Organizational and Industrial Psychology
    • SPAN 321: Business Spanish
    • THTR 480: The Business of Show Biz
    • Any internship with an entrepreneurial focus, according to the following stipulations.
      • The internship must be cleared with the Program chair of Entrepreneurship and Innovation before the internship starts, at which time the student must demonstrate that the internship will have an important connection with the entrepreneurship curriculum.  Upon completing the internship, the student must also submit a reflective paper to the Program chair that speaks to the internship’s entrepreneurship experiences. At most one elective can be satisfied with an internship, regardless of whether the internship is for one or two credits.

    ^ Business majors and minors who also minor in Entrepreneurship and Innovation cannot count BUSN 345 Principles of Marketing toward their business major or minor as a 300-level elective.

  • Major and Minor in Environmental Studies

    Requirements for the Major:

    A Major in Environmental Studies may be of particular interest to students who are considering careers or graduate programs in diverse subjects such as renewable energy technology, non-profit management, education, ecosystems, energy, and environmental policy. Moreover, it will complement any student’s liberal arts education. 

    A minimum of eleven credits is required. A cumulative average of a C or better must be maintained across all courses used to fulfill the major

    Required (not necessarily in this order):

    1. Introduction to Environmental Studies (ES 110)
    2. Introduction to Chemistry (Chem 115) or Environmental Chemistry (Chem/ES 108)
    3. Evolution, Ecology, and Environment (ES 220) or Ecology and Evolution (Bio 220)
    4. Introduction to Probability and Statistics (Math 150) or Reasoning & Statistical Inference (Bio 150) or Quantitative Methods for Economics and Business (Econ 180) OR ECON/BUSN/FIN 130 Applied Statistics
    5. Environmental Ethics (ES 210) or Religious Perspectives on Environmental Issues (ES 240) or Endangered Species and Endangered Languages (ES 368) or Who Speaks for Animals? (ES 387)
    6. Economics 210 (Microeconomic Theory) or any Politics course at the 200 level or above
    7. Senior Studies Requirement in Environmental Studies. Senior Seminar Courses are offered each year. The Senior Studies requirement can be satisfied by completing either the Senior Seminar or by completing a Senior Thesis. The requirement may also be met by the completion of an Independent Research Project with the prior approval of the Program chair.

    Additional requirements:
     Four elective courses from the lists of elective courses below; at least one must be from each group, and at least two must be 300-level or above. 

     Group 1 (Natural Sciences)

    • Spring Flora of the Great Lakes (ES 203)
    • Summer Flora of the Great Lakes (ES 204)
    • Molecules, Genes, and Cells (Bio 221)
    • Organic Chemistry I (Chem 220)
    • Organic Chemistry II (Chem 221)
    • Lake Forestry (ES 282)
    • Biochemistry (Chem 300)
    • The Science of Human Energy Use (ES 316)
    • Animal Physiology (Bio 340)
    • Developmental Biology (Bio 342)
    • Animal Behavior (Bio 344)
    • Ecology (Bio 370)
    • Earth’s Ancient Ecology (Bio 372)
    • Community Ecology (Bio 373)
    • Conservation Biology (Bio 375)
    • Animal Conservation (ES 376)
    • Tropical Ecology and Conservation (Bio 380)
    • Plant Biology (Bio 384)
    • Evolution (Bio 389)
    • Plant and Animal Interactions (Bio 483)
    • Biological Implications of Climate Change (Bio 487)

     Group 2 (Humanities and Social Sciences)

    • American Environmental Literature (Engl 206)
    • Literature of Place: Chicago (ES 207)
    • Environmental Ethics (ES 210)
    • Environmental Psychology (Psyc 215)
    • Environmental Education (ES 216)
    • Troubled World Geography (ES 217)
    • Philosophy of Science (Phil 225)
    • Religious Perspectives on Environmental Issues (ES 240)
    • American Environmental History (ES 260)
    • American Cities (ES 263)
    • Technology and Human Values (ES 271)
    • Cultural Ecology of Africa (Soan 273)
    • Sustainable Food Systems (ES 287)
    • Biodiversity and Agriculture (ES 289)
    • The Social Ethics of Energy Production and Use (ES 315)
    • Environmental Sociology (Soan 316)
    • Landscape and Representation (Art 320)
    • Sight, Site, Insight (Art 322)
    • Environmental and Natural Resource Economics (ES 340)
    • Chicago: The Food City (ES 344)
    • The American West (Hist 310)
    • Environmental Law (ES 361)
    • The Political Ecology of Things (ES 362)
    • Poetry and Nature (ES 365)
    • Environmental Writing (ES 367)
    • Endangered Species and Endangered Languages (ES 368)
    • Who Speaks for Animals? (ES 387)

    ES 210, 240, 368, and 387 cannot be double-counted for both Requirement 5 and Group 2.

    Students are urged to consult with their advisors to design a program of study that best meets their interests and needs. Students electing to major in environmental studies must choose a member of the Environmental Studies Program Committee as an academic advisor.

    Students are also encouraged to consider a research project, off-campus program, or internship as a way to further their studies. An internship cannot replace an elective course, but is in many cases an excellent complement to the student’s coursework.  

     

    Requirements for the Minor:

    The interdisciplinary minor in Environmental Studies is designed for students who have a strong interest in environmental issues but do not wish to complete a major at the undergraduate level.  This minor may be of particular interest to students who are considering careers or graduate programs in diverse subjects such as renewable energy technology, non-profit management, education, ecosystems, energy and environmental policy. Moreover, it will complement any student’s liberal arts education. This minor may also interest students who wish to teach abroad following graduation, as well as students who wish to engage in cross-curricular research projects.

    Requirements:

    Students must take six courses to complete the minor, one of which must be at the 300 level or above.

    1.  Environmental Studies 110 is required.

    2.  Take the following Natural Science courses:

    One of the following:

    • World Thirst for Energy (Chem 107) or Foundations of Chemistry (Chem 114)
    • Environmental Chemistry (ES 108)
    • Chemistry I (Chem 115)
    • Biochemistry (Chem 300)
    • The Science of Human Energy Use (ES 316)
    • Inorganic Chemistry (Chem 340)

    One of the following:

    • Spring Flora of the Great Lakes (ES 203)
    • Summer Flora of the Great Lakes (ES 204)
    • Evolution, Ecology, and Environment (ES 220) or Ecology and Evolution (Bio 220)
    • Lake Forestry (ES 282)
    • Ecology (Bio 370)
    • Earth’s Ancient Ecology (Bio 372)
    • Community Ecology (Bio 373)
    • Conservation Biology (Bio 375)
    • Animal Conservation (ES 376)
    • Plant and Animal Interactions (Bio 483)
    • Biological Implications of Climate Change (Bio 487)

    3. Take any three of the following Social Science and Humanity courses:

    • Geography and Demography (ES 117)
    • American Environmental Literature (Engl 206)
    • Literature of Place: Chicago (ES 207)
    • Environmental Ethics (ES 210)
    • Environmental Psychology (Psyc 215)
    • Environmental Education (ES 216)
    • Troubled World Geography (ES 217)
    • Philosophy of Science (Phil 225)
    • Religious Perspectives on Environmental Issues (ES 240)
    • American Environmental History (ES 260)
    • American Cities (ES 263)
    • Sustainable Food Systems (ES 287)
    • Biodiversity and Agriculture (ES 289)
    • Technology and Human Values (ES 271)
    • The Social Ethics of Energy Production and Use (ES 315)
    • Environmental Sociology (Soan 316)
    • Landscape and Representation (Art 320)
    • Sight, Site, Insight (Art 322)
    • Environmental and Natural Resource Economics (ES 340)
    • Chicago: The Food City (ES 344)
    • The American West (Hist 310)
    • Environmental Law (ES 361)
    • The Political Ecology of Things (ES 362)
    • Poetry and Nature (ES 365)
    • Environmental Writing (ES 367)
    • Endangered Species and Endangered Languages (ES 368)
    • Who Speaks for Animals? (ES 387)
    • Environmental Studies Capstone Seminar (ES 480)
    • Internship with an approved environmental focus
  • Major and Minor in History

    Requirements for the Major:

    At least 9 credits

    • History 110: Introduction to Historical Studies: World Civilizations to 1650 – preferably in the first year
    • 1 of the following two-course sequences:
      • United States
        • History 200: Foundations of the American Republic
        • History 201: Modern America
      • East Asia
        • History 212: Origins of East Asia
        • History 213: Modern East Asia
      • South Asia
        • History 216: History of India
        • History 217: Modern South Asia
      • Ancient and Medieval Europe
        • History 204: Roman History
        • History 205: Medieval History
      • Modern Europe
        • History 208: Europe 1715-1890
        • History 209: Europe in the Twentieth Century
    • History 300: Theory and Methods – taken as a junior
    • 4 additional courses, at least two of which must be at the 300-level or above
    • Completion of the Senior Studies Requirement in 1 of the following ways:
      • History 420: Senior Seminar
      • Senior Thesis

    Requirements for the Minor:

    The Minor in History consists of 6 courses, 2 of which must be on or above the 300-level. History 300 is encouraged but not required for the minor.

    A note on repeated courses

    Lake Forest College policy states that students who receive a C- or lower in a course may repeat that course once with replacement of the earlier grade. Normally, students must repeat a course with the same course number. However, in the spring of 2014 the History Department instituted a comprehensive course re-numbering. This could cause confusion among students wishing to repeat a course but finding that it now has a different number. Students in this situation should consult with the chair of History to be sure that they are repeating the same course, regardless of the different number.

  • Independent Scholar Major

    The Independent Scholar program allows students to enroll in the program by developing an academic major of their own, culminating in a thesis or a creative project working closely with a faculty advisor. This major is compatible with a student’s pursuit of a second major as well.

    Students with a high GPA are invited to apply and submit a detailed presentation of their case for admission into the program at the end of their sophomore year. The Independent Scholar program takes place during the junior and senior years. The Independent Scholar Committee determines admission.

    The Independent Scholar Program is a program for outstanding students; all students must complete a senior thesis or project and an examination in the major. Not subject to the normal limitations for tutorials and research projects, Independent Scholars are encouraged to include extensive independent study in their major. They are expected as well to fulfill the ideals of a liberal arts education. Their program advisors do not need to be members of the Independent Scholar Committee.

  • Major and Minor in International Relations

    Students in international relations must take a core set of courses that will form a firm basis from which to study advanced areas in depth. The core courses will acquaint the student with concepts such as the balance of power, the development of the nation-state system in Europe, non-Western history, basic models of human societies, and basic economic principles. 

    Requirements for the Major:

    At least 11 credits

    • Economics 110: Principles of Economics
    • Sociology & Anthropology 110: Introduction to Sociology and Anthropology
    • 1 of the following courses:
      • History 212: Europe from the Old Regime to the Modern Era
      • History 213: Europe in the Twentieth Century
    • Politics 245: Theories of International Relations
    • completion of a foreign language through the 305 or 320 level – required for students whose primary language is English
    • at least 2 courses with a comparative perspective to become familiar with differences and similarities among different states and societies – chosen from the following courses:
      • International Relations 280: The Mexican-American Border
      • Politics 210: Politics of Western Europe and the European Union
      • Politics 212: Politics of the Third World
      • Politics 216: The Politics of the Middle East
      • Politics 217: African Politics
      • Politics 219: The Politics of Latin America
      • Politics 310: State and Nation Building
      • Politics 313: Political Islam
    • at least 4 additional courses to focus interest on a series of interrelated topics – could be courses, internships, or independent studies
    • completion of the Senior Studies Requirement in 1 of the following ways:
      • International Relations 480: Senior Seminar
      • Senior Thesis
      • research project

    Students must maintain a C average in courses taken in the major.

    Requirements for the Minor:

    At least 8 credits

    May be completed in 1 of 2 ways:

    • 4 foreign language courses
    • 2 core courses
    • 2 comparative courses
    • 2 foreign language courses
    • 4 core courses
    • 2 comparative courses 

    Students should consult course requirements in the major for clarification of core and comparative courses.

     

  • Major and Minor in International Relations

    Requirements for the Major:

    The International Relations (IR) major consists of twelve courses: seven core courses and five elective courses, as well as proficiency in a foreign language. Students must maintain a C average in courses taken to fulfill the IR major requirements.

    CORE COURSES (7)

    • Foundations

    •     ECON 110: Principles of Economics

    •     POLS 110: Introduction to Global Politics

    •     SOAN 110: Introduction to Sociology and Anthropology

    • Methods (one of the following courses)

    •     ECON/BUSN 180: Quantitative Methods for Economics and Business OR

          ECON/BUSN/FIN 130: Applied Statistics     

    •     BUSN 355: Marketing Research in Cross-Cultural Settings

    •     POLS 200: Methods of Political Research

    •     SOAN 310: Social Research: Quantitative Methods

    •     SOAN 320: Social Research: Qualitative Methods

    • Theory

    •     POLS 245: Theories of International Relations

    • History (one of the following courses)

    •     HIST 208: Europe 1715-1890

    •     HIST 209: Europe in the Twentieth Century

    • Senior Studies (one of the following courses)*

    •     IREL 480, IREL 481, or IREL 482: International Relations Senior Seminar

    •     IREL 493: International Relations Senior Research Project

    •     IREL 494: International Relations Senior Thesis (two course credits)

    •     POLS 481 or POLS 483: Senior Seminar in Global Politics

    ELECTIVE COURSES (5)

    The five additional courses required for the IR major are comprised of 200 and 300 level international studies courses offered by various departments and programs, here listed as fields.**  Students take at least one course in three different fields (but no more than three in any single field and only one course in Field 5).  Furthermore, of the five at least two must be comparative studies courses, which are designated below with the plus symbol (+).  In consultation with their academic advisors, students majoring in international relations choose areas of specialization.  Areas can be either functional (e.g., development studies, international political economy, international law and organization, cultural studies, international history) or regional (e.g., Latin American studies, European studies, Islamic world studies, Asian studies, African studies).  Taken together, the academic work students perform in their five elective courses must complement their chosen specialization.  Within 60 days of declaring the major, IR students must submit to their advisor and the IR chair the following:  (1) the title of the intended specialization along with a one-page description of the specialization and its main learning goals; and (2) a list of possible courses for the five-course specialization.  Students may change their specializations (and the list of possible elective courses) through the end of the third year of full-time studies.

    • Field 1. History

    •     HIST 212: Origins of East Asia+

    •     HIST 213: Modern East Asia+

    •     HIST 216: History of India

    •     HIST 217: Modern South Asia+

    •     HIST 255: History of Russia

    •     HIST 257: World War II: Europe+

    •     HIST 272: History of Mexico

    •     HIST 288: Women in Modern History+

    •     HIST 260: Modern China

    •     HIST 264: World War II in Asia+

    •     HIST 262: Modern Japan

    •     HIST 348: Stereotyping Indian Cities

    •     HIST 340: Topics in East Asian History+

    •     HIST 342: Problems in Modern Chinese History: Film

    •     HIST 351: Contemporary Islamic Societies+

    •     HIST 345: Islamic Cultures in South Asia+

    •     HIST 347: Race & Empire in Colonial South Asia+

     

    • Field 2. Politics

    •     POLS 210: Politics of Europe+

    •     POLS 211: Islam in Africa+

    •     POLS 213: Non-Violence and Politics of Change+

    •     POLS 214: Politics of South Africa

    •     POLS 215: Asian Politics+

    •     POLS 216: Politics of Middle East+

    •     POLS 217: African Politics+

    •     POLS 219: Politics of Latin America+

    •     POLS 240: American Foreign Policy

    •     POLS 241: Global Issues

    •     POLS 242: Politics of the Third World+

    •     POLS 310: State and Nation Building+

    •     POLS 311: Comparative Nationalism+

    •     POLS 317: Transitions to Democracy+

    •     POLS 318: Topics in Comparative Politics

    •     POLS 347: International Institutions

    •     POLS 348: International Law

    •     POLS 349: Topics in International Relations

     

    • Field 3. Business and Economics

    •     ECON 220: Macroeconomic Theory

    •     ECON 245: Child Labor in Latin America

    •     ECON 280: The Mexican-American Border+

    •     ECON 381: Economics of Development+

    •     BUSN 322: Emerging Markets Analysis+

    •     BUSN 341: Global Cultures & International Business-Chicago+

    •     BUSN 342: African Culture & Business Development+

     

    • Field 4. Cultures and Societies

    Education

    •     EDUC 320: Comparative and International Education+

    •     EDUC 322: Education in Developing Countries+

    Modern Languages

    Chinese

    •     CHIN 260: Intro to Chinese Culture in English

    French

    •     FREN 305: Introduction to French Culture

    •     FREN 308: Contemporary France

    •     FREN 320: French for International Affairs & Business

    •     FREN 330: The French-Speaking World+

    •     FREN 333: Exploring French Culture thru Film

    •     FREN 340: Advanced French International Affairs

    German

    •     GERM 333: Modern German Film

    Spanish

    •     SPAN 304: Cocina y Cultura y Literatura+

    •     SPAN 306: Intro Latin American Culture+

    •     SPAN 308: Spain Today

    •     SPAN 320: Spanish for International Affairs

    •     SPAN 321: Business Spanish

    •     SPAN 333: Cine e Historia Espana y America Latina+

    •     SPAN 337: The Latin American World+

    •     SPAN 338: Cine Latinoamericano+

    •     SPAN 340: Advanced Spanish International Affairs

    •     SPAN 380: Cine, Literatura y Sociedad America Latino+

    •     SPAN 400: Women’s Voices in Latin America+

    •     SPAN 425: Latin American Culture+

    •     SPAN 480: Literature & History in Hispanic World+

    Philosophy

    •     PHIL 212: Multicultural Approaches to the Environment+

    •     PHIL 272: Currents in Latin American Thought+

    •     PHIL 275: Desire and Discipline: Asian Morals+

    •     PHIL 276: Social Justice and Human Rights+

    •     PHIL 277: Social Justice Versus Freedom?

    •     PHIL 285: Topics in Japanese Thought

    •     PHIL 305: Comparative Philosophy: East and West+

    Religion

    •     RELG 213: Islam+

    •     RELG 214: Hinduism+

    •     RELG 215: Introduction to Buddhism+

    •     RELG 216: Chinese Religions+

    •     RELG 220: Islam and Pop Culture+

    •     RELG 255: Islam and Modernity+

    •     RELG 318: Contemporary Buddhism and Society+

    •     RELG 321: Jewish-Christian-Muslim Conversations

    Sociology and Anthropology

    •     SOAN 221: Cultures of Modern Africa+

    •     SOAN 231: Histories & Cultures Latin America+

    •     SOAN 245: Medical Anthropology+

    •     SOAN 246: Anthropology of Communication+

    •     SOAN 247: Anthropology of Pacific Islands+

    •     SOAN 250: Anthropology of Globalization+

    •     SOAN 253: Family and Kinship+

    •     SOAN 271: Technology and Human Values+

    •     SOAN 280: Gender, Culture, and Society+

    •     SOAN 302: Sexuality and Society+

    •     SOAN 315: Social Ethics of Energy Production & Use+

    •     SOAN 322: Sociology of Islam+

    •     SOAN 354: Anthropology of Place+

    •     SOAN 355: Power and Violence+

    •     SOAN 385: Intellectuals and Society+

    •     SOAN 390: Sociology of Religion+

     

    • Field 5. Applied International Relations

    At the discretion of the IR Chair, an appropriate domestic or international internship may count as a single elective credit.

     

    Foreign language proficiency

    In addition to the twelve-course curriculum in international relations, IR majors shall demonstrate proficiency in a language other than English.  This requirement may be satisfied with a grade of C minus or better in one foreign language course at the 300 level of instruction.  Students whose native language is not English may have this requirement waived if they take and pass an oral and written examination in their native language.  The chair of the International Relations program shall arrange these special examinations and has the sole authority to waive this requirement. 

     

    Distributional requirements, double-counted courses, and course appeals

    • Normally, students count three 100-level courses for the international relations major (ECON 110, POLS 110, and SOAN 110).  The sole exception applies to students who meet the IR major’s methods course requirement with BUSN/ECON 180, in which case a curriculum with four 100-level courses is permissible. 
    • Of the twelve courses that comprise the international relations major, at least four courses must be at the 300 or 400 levels. 
    • IR majors may double-count two courses for the international relations major toward the other major or a minor.
    • IR majors may appeal the IR chair to substitute as many as four transferable courses taken at another academic institution of higher learning in the United States and abroad for core and elective courses (other than the senior studies requirement).

     

    Requirements for the Minor: 

    The International Relations (IR) minor is comprised of eight courses in two parts.  Students must maintain a C average in courses taken to fulfill the IR minor requirements.

    Part 1

    CORE COURSES (4)

    • POLS 245: Theories of International Relations
    • Choose three of the following courses: 

    •     POLS 110: Introduction to Global Politics

    •     ECON 110: Principles of Economics

    •     SOAN 110: Introduction to Sociology and Anthropology

    •     HIST 208: Europe 1715-1890 or HIST 209: Europe in the Twentieth Century

    •     IREL 480: International Relations Senior Seminar or POLS 481: Senior Seminar in Global Politics***

    Part 2

    Option A

    •     Four elective courses from at least two separate fields, with two at the 200 level and two at the 300 level.

    Option B

    •    Two elective courses from separate fields, with one at the 200 level and one at the 300 level.

    •     Two foreign language courses (in the same language) at the 200 level or above.

    IR minors may double-count two international relations courses with a major or another minor.


    * Majors may also appeal to the IR chair to substitute a senior seminar in Business, Economics, History, or Sociology/Anthropology for IREL 480 or POLS 481.  Consent of the appropriate senior studies instructors and the academic advisor is also required.

     

    ** Some of these courses are cross-listed in two or more departments and/or programs, but they are listed here according to their “home” department or program.   Also, some courses, especially those at the 300 and 400 levels, have departmental/program prerequisites; please check the appropriate departmental/program web site for more information on prerequisites.

     

    *** IR minors may also appeal to the IR chair to substitute a senior seminar in Business, Economics, History, and Sociology/Anthropology for IREL 480 or POLS 481.  Consent of the appropriate senior studies instructors and the academic advisor is also required.

  • Minor in Islamic World Studies

    No major is available.

    Requirements for the Minor:

    At least 6 courses

    • 1 required foundational course:  RELG/ISLM/ASIA 213, Global Islam
    • 5 electives: any ISLM or Arabic language course, including one course at the 300-level.

    IWS minors are encouraged to take Arabic and to participate in a study abroad program in a country with a significant Muslim population.

  • Major and Minor in Latin American Studies

    Requirements for the Major:

    At least 10 credits

    • 2 courses in the arts and humanities chosen from:
      • Art 226: Colonial Latin American Art 
      • Philosophy 272: Currents in Latin American Thought
      • any course in Spanish, Foreign Civilization, or Literature in Translation on Latin America
    • 2 courses in the social sciences chosen from:
      • Economics 245: Child Labor in Latin America
      • Business/Economics/IREL 280/Spanish 201: The Mexican-American Border
      • Business 470: Latin American Global Business
      • History 272: History of Mexico
      • Politics 219: The Politics of Latin America
      • any course in Sociology & Anthropology on Latin America
    • 5 additional courses, with at least 2 at the 300-level, chosen from:
      • Art 226: Colonial Latin American Art
      • Biology / Environmental Studies 380: Tropical Ecology and Conservation
      • Business 470: Latin American Global Business
      • Economics 245:  Child Labor in Latin America
      • Economics / Business 322: Emerging Markets Analysis
      • Economics / Business 489: Globalization and its Impact on Rich and Poor Countries
      • History 272: History of Mexico
      • Philosophy 272: Currents in Latin American Thought
      • Politics 219: The Politics of Latin America
      • Politics 239/Spanish 202: Global City/City of Neighborhoods
      • Sociology & Anthropology 231: Histories and Cultures of Latin America
      • Sociology & Anthropology 242: Maya Cultures and Histories
      • Sociology & Anthropology 243: Andes Cultures and Histories
      • Sociology & Anthropology 272: Popular Culture in Latin America
      • Spanish 304: Cocina y cultura
      • Spanish 305: The Civilization of Spain
      • Spanish 306: Introduction to Latin American Culture
      • Spanish 313: Spanish for Heritage Speakers
      • Spanish 317: Portuguese for Spanish Speakers
      • Spanish 320: Spanish for International Affairs
      • Spanish 325: U.S. Latino Literature
      • Spanish 333: Cine e Historia en América Latina
      • Spanish 335: Survey of Latin American Literature
      • Spanish 336: Latin American Film
      • Spanish 337/Latin American Studies 302: The Latin American World
      • Spanish 338: Cine Latinoamericano
      • Spanish 339/Latin American Studies 209: Brazilian Literature in Translation
      • Spanish 350: Modern Latin American Narrative in Translation
      • Spanish 365: Latin American Narrative
      • Spanish 367: Latin America: A Creative Approach
      • Spanish 370: Hispanic Poetry
      • Spanish 380: Cine, Literatura y Sociedad en América Latina
      • Spanish / Women’s and Gender Studies 400: Special Studies: Women’s Voices in  Latin America
      • Spanish 425: Latin American Culture and Civilization
      • Spanish 480: Senior Seminar in Spanish (in years when the topic is pertinent to Latin American Studies)
      • Off-Campus Study – Course credit gained through participation in study programs in Latin America may be used to fulfill part of the electives requirement. All such credit must be approved in advance by the Latin American Studies Committee. Students are encouraged to participate in Lake Forest College’s Fall semester International Internship Program in Grenada Spain, which provides a professional internship experience. The committed also recommends the Border Studies Program (LNAM 280) offered in the spring semester. The two Costa Rica programs sponsored by the Associated Colleges of the Midwest are also recommended. All credits earned on foreign programs will count at the 300 or 400 level.
      • other alternatives – A maximum of two credits may be obtained through tutorials, research projects, creative projects, and domestic internships.
    • the Senior Studies requirement can be completed in one of the following ways:
      • Latin American Studies 480: Senior Seminar
      • senior thesis
      • senior research project

    Language Proficiency

    Students must demonstrate language proficiency in Spanish or Portuguese. This requirement may be met through examination or by completing a Spanish or Portuguese course at the 300 or 400 level.

    Requirements for the Minor:

    At least 7 credits

    • 2 courses in the arts and humanities chosen from:
      • Art 226: Colonial Latin American Art
      • Philosophy 272: Currents in Latin American Thought
      • any course in Spanish, Foreign Civilization, or Literature in Translation on Latin America
    • 2 courses in the social sciences chosen from:
      • Economics 245: Child Labor in Latin America
      • Business 470: Latin American Global Business
      • History 272: History of Mexico
      • Politics 219: The Politics of Latin America
      • any course in Sociology & Anthropology on Latin America
    • students may complete the 3 remaining credits through the following course options:
      • Art 226: Colonial Latin American Art
      • Biology / Environmental Studies 380: Tropical Ecology and Conservation
      • Business 470: Latin American Global Business
      • Economics 245:  Child Labor in Latin America
      • Economics / Business 322: Emerging Markets Analysis
      • Economics / Business 489: Globalization and its Impact on Rich and Poor Countries
      • History 272: History of Mexico
      • Philosophy 272: Currents in Latin American Thought
      • Politics 219: The Politics of Latin America
      • Sociology & Anthropology 231: Histories and Cultures of Latin America
      • Sociology & Anthropology 242: Maya Cultures and Histories
      • Sociology & Anthropology 243: Andes Cultures and Histories
      • Sociology & Anthropology 272: Popular Culture in Latin America
      • Spanish 304: Cocina y cultura
      • Spanish 305: The Civilization of Spain
      • Spanish 306: Introduction to Latin American Culture
      • Spanish 313: Spanish for Heritage Speakers
      • Spanish 317: Portuguese for Spanish Speakers
      • Spanish 320: Spanish for International Affairs
      • Spanish 325: U.S. Latino Literature
      • Spanish 333: Cine e Historia en España y América Latina
      • Spanish 335: Survey of Latin American Literature
      • Spanish 336: Latin American Film
      • Spanish 337/Latin American Studies 302: The Latin American World
      • Spanish 338: Cine Latinoamericano
      • Spanish 339/Latin American Studies 209: Brazilian Literature in Translation
      • Spanish 350: Modern Latin American Narrative in Translation
      • Spanish 365: Latin American Narrative
      • Spanish 367: Latin America: A Creative Approach
      • Spanish 370: Hispanic Poetry
      • Spanish 380: Cine, Literatura y Sociedad en América Latina
      • Spanish / Women’s and Gender Studies 400: Special Studies: Women’s Voices in Latin America
      • Spanish 425: Latin American Culture and Civilization
      • Spanish 480: Senior Seminar in Spanish (in years when the topic is pertinent to Latin American Studies)
      • Off-Campus Study – Course credit gained through participation in study programs in Latin America may be used to fulfill part of the electives requirement. All such credit must be approved in advance by the Latin American Studies Committee. Students are encouraged to participate in Lake Forest College’s Fall semester International Internship Program in Grenada Spain, which provides a professional internship experience. The committee also recommends the Border Studies Program (LNAM 280) offered in the spring semester. The two Costa Rica programs sponsored by the Associated Colleges of the Midwest are also recommended. All credits earned on foreign programs will count at the 300 or 400 level.
      • other alternatives – A maximum of two credits may be obtained through tutorials, research projects, creative projects, and domestic internships.
  • Minor in Legal Studies

    No major is currently available.

    Requirements for the Minor:

    At least 6 credits

    • Politics 260: Introduction to Legal Studies
    • 1 of the following courses:
      • Philosophy 156: Logic and Styles of Arguments
      • Communication 253: Argumentation and Advocacy
    • at least 4 additional courses, 2 of which must be at the 300-level – the 4 courses must be from 2 or more different departments
      • American Studies 200: Topics: Law and Literature
      • Communication 250: Classical Rhetorical Tradition
      • Communication 381: History and Theory of Freedom of Expression
      • Communication 387: Rhetoric of Law
      • Economics 345: Economics and Law
      • Environmental Studies 361: Environmental Law
      • Environmental Studies 388: Who Speaks for Nature?
      • History 239: History of Education in American Society
      • History 306: Civil Rights Movement
      • Philosophy 240: Philosophy of Law
      • Politics 261: American Constitutional Law
      • Politics 262: Jurisprudence: Philosophy of American Law
      • Politics 266: The Judiciary
      • Politics 267: Intro to Criminal Law & Procedure
      • Politics 268: Law, Medicine and Ethics
      • Politics 269: Testimony and Trials
      • Politics 318: Race and Criminal Justice in America
      • Politics 348: International Law
      • Politics 357: Justice and the Law
      • Politics 361: The First Amendment
      • Politics 363: The Fourteenth Amendment
      • Politics 365: Civil Liberties
      • Politics 369: Special Topics in Public Law: Federal Indian Law
      • Politics 484: Senior Seminar in American Politics and Law: Searches, Seizures, and Security
      • Psychology 430: Psychology and the Law
      • Sociology & Anthropology 240: Deviance
      • Sociology & Anthropology 290: Social Problems and Social Policy
      • Sociology & Anthropology 395: Law, Culture and Society
      • independent study on legal topics, administered through a related academic department
      • internship credit with substantive engagement with legal issues, administered through a related academic department – could include work with law enforcement, social work, juvenile justice, prosecutors or defenders, law firms, etc.
  • Majors and Minors in Mathematics and Computer Science

    The Department of Mathematics & Computer Science is a joint department that offers 2 majors and 2 minors – a major and minor in mathematics and a major and minor in computer science.

    Requirements for the Major in Mathematics:

    At least 12 credits

    • Mathematics 110: Calculus I (or Mathematics 115: Honors Calculus I)
    • Mathematics 111: Calculus II (or Mathematics 116: Honors Calculus II)
    • Mathematics 210: Multivariable Calculus
    • Mathematics 230: Introduction to Abstract  and Discrete Mathematics
    • Mathematics 231: Linear Algebra
    • Mathematics 311: Introduction to Real Analysis
    • Mathematics 330: Modern Algebra I
    • Computer Science 112: Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming
    • 1 of the following 2-course sequences:
      • Mathematics 331: Modern Algebra II and an additional Mathematics course at the 300-level or above
      • Mathematics 350: Mathematical Probability and Mathematics 351: Mathematical Statistics
      • Mathematics 411: Topics in Modern Analysis (Real Analysis II) and an additional Mathematics course at the 300-level or above
    • At least 1 additional course chosen from the following:
      • Physics 120: General Physics I
      • Philosophy 265 / Computer Science 260: Symbolic Logic 
      • Economics 330: Econometrics 
      • any Computer Science course numbered 212 or above
    • The Senior Studies requirement, which can be met in one of the following ways:
      • a senior seminar
      • a senior thesis

    Internship credit may not be counted toward the major.

    Most majors who plan careers in mathematics elect more than the minimum number of courses that are required. A reading knowledge of a foreign language is strongly recommended for students who plan to attend graduate school.

    Requirements for the Minor in Mathematics:

    At least 7 credits

    • Mathematics 110: Calculus I (or Mathematics 115: Honors Calculus I)
    • Mathematics 111: Calculus II (or Mathematics 116: Honors Calculus II)
    • Mathematics 210: Multivariable Calculus
    • Mathematics 230: Introduction to Abstract  and Discrete Mathematics
    • 1 of the following courses:
      • Mathematics 214: Differential Equations
      • Mathematics 231: Linear Algebra
    • Computer Science 112: Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming
    • at least 1 additional Mathematics course at the 300-level or above

    Recommendations for Students Interested in Actuarial Science:

    The department encourages students interested in the actuarial profession to prepare for the examinations administered by the Society of Actuaries for certification as an Associate or Fellow in that professional organization. Students interested in the actuarial profession should choose the following courses:

    • Mathematics 110: Calculus I (or Mathematics 115: Honors Calculus I)
    • Mathematics 111: Calculus II (or Mathematics 116: Honors Calculus II)
    • Mathematics 210: Multivariable Calculus
    • Mathematics 230: Introduction to Abstract  and Discrete Mathematics
    • Mathematics 231: Linear Algebra
    • Mathematics 314: Numerical Analysis
    • Mathematics 350: Mathematical Probability
    • Mathematics 351: Mathematical Statistics

    Requirements for the Major in Computer Science:

    The Computer Science major is designed to prepare students, within a liberal arts setting, for careers or graduate work in the field of computer science. The curriculum emphasizes core fundamentals, object-oriented programming and design, Web-centric computing, and important application domains as well as theoretical results. Instruction takes advantage of a wide range of computer technology to facilitate learning and exploration. The departmental labs are fully-networked, providing Windows, Macintosh, and Linux computing environments. Students interested in the major are strongly encouraged to begin their studies during their first year.

    The minimum requirements for the major in Computer Science are completion of at least 10 courses as follows:

    • Mathematics 110
    • Mathematics 230
    • Computer Science 112
    • Computer Science 212
    • Computer Science 213
    • Computer Science 317
    • Computer Science 318 or Computer Science 336.
    • Two additional courses in Computer Science numbered 300 or above.
    • The senior seminar (Computer Science 488 or Computer Science 489) or senior thesis in Computer Science.

    Internship credit may not be counted toward the major.

    Recommended (but not required) are the following:

    • Mathematics 111
    • Mathematics 150 (or 350 and 351 for a stronger theoretical background),
    • Mathematics 231
    • Mathematics 314
    • Mathematics 375
    • Philosophy 265
    • Students interested in attending graduate school in computer science are strongly encouraged to take Computer Science 434 and Computer Science 461.

    Requirements for the Minor in Computer Science:

    The Computer Science minor is designed to impart the basics of the field of computer science and develop a proficiency in programming.  In addition to a foundation in traditional object oriented programming, at least one course in Web programming is required.

    The minimum requirements for the minor in Computer Science are completion of at least 6 courses as follows:

    • Mathematics 110
    • Computer Science 107 (Computer Science 312 or 318 may be substituted for 107.)
    • Computer Science 112
    • Computer Science 212
    • Two additional courses from the following list:
      • Computer Science 213
      • Computer Science 312
      • Computer Science 317
      • Computer Science 318
      • Computer Science 336

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